The Next 50 Years

When IDEAS celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in October 2015, we convened a special forum at Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto. It was to address the prevailing sense that the human species may be facing "the end". Environmental collapse. Global financial meltdown. Interethnic bloodshed. Not to mention the possibility of a sixth massive extinction. Will there be enough food? Will we all be crammed into dystopian megacities? How will we escape our long history of bloody conflict? Three panelists join host Paul Kennedy to argue - cautiously - how humanity may not only survive, but actually thrive.
The Next 50 Years event in the Glenn Gould Studio. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy on stage with panelists Evan Fraser, Jennifer Keesmaat, and Payam Akhavan. (Farhang Ghajar/CBC)
Listen to the full episode54:00
When IDEAS celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in October 2015, we convened a special forum at Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto. It was to address the prevailing sense that the human species may be facing "the end". Environmental collapse. Global financial meltdown. Interethnic bloodshed. Not to mention the possibility of a sixth massive extinction. Will there be enough food? Will we all be crammed into dystopian megacities? How will we escape our long history of bloody conflict? Three panelists join host Paul Kennedy to argue - cautiously - how humanity may not only survive, but actually thrive. **This episode originally aired February 26, 2016.

Environmental collapse. Financial meltdown. Endless warfare. It's easy to despair. But Payam Akhavan believes humanity has a bright future. 1:12

 


Participants in this episode:

  • Evan Fraser, Canada Research Chair in Global Food Security at the University of Guelph and author of Empires of Food: Feast, Famine and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations.
     
  • Jennifer Keesmaat, Chief Planner and Executive Director of the City of Toronto.
     
  • Payam Akhavan, Professor of International Law at McGill University, Visiting Fellow at Oxford University, author of Reducing Genocide to Law: Definition, Meaning, and the Ultimate Crime and the CBC Massey Lecturer for 2017.
     

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