The Enright Files - Ideas to make a better world

Many of the things we take for granted in Canada -- universal health care, public pensions, a five-day work week -- were once considered utopian pipe dreams. The same is true of a lot of current ideas to make a better world and improve our quality of life: they endure ridicule and pushback until some brave souls flout conventional wisdom and try them out. This month on the Enright Files, ideas to improve our communities, our countries and our quality of life.
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Listen to the full episode53:59

Many of the things we take for granted in Canada -- universal health care, public pensions, a five-day work week -- were once considered utopian pipe dreams. The same is true of a lot of current ideas to make a better world and improve our quality of life: they endure ridicule and pushback until some brave souls flout conventional wisdom and try them out. This month on The Enright Files, ideas to improve our communities, our countries and our quality of life.
 

Guests in this episode: 

  • Rutger Bregman, the author of Utopia for Realists: The Case for a Universal Basic Income, Open Borders, and a 15-Hour Workweek.
     
  • Janette Sadik-Khan, the former Transportation Commissioner for New York City and the co-author of Street Fight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution.
     
  • Pasi Sahlberg, the Director General of the Centre for International Mobility and Cooperation in Helsink and the author of Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn from Educational Change in Finland?
     
  • Karyn McCluskey, the Director of the Violence Reduction Unit of the Glasgow police.

**The Enright Files is produced by Chris Wodskou

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