ideas

The Eminent Dr. Nurse

British geneticist Sir Paul Maxime Nurse discovered some fascinating secrets about his own hereditary background long after he made the discoveries that won him a Nobel Prize. On the occasion of being honoured with the 2015 Henry Friesen Prize, he speaks with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy.
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine winner Paul Nurse of England gives a press conference on May 13, 2015 after a lunch at the European Commission in Brussels. (Getty Images/AFP Photo /Emmanuel Dunand)
Listen to the full episode53:59

British geneticist Sir Paul Maxime Nurse recently discovered some fascinating secrets about his own hereditary background, long after he made the discoveries that won him a Nobel Prize in 2001.  On the occasion of being honoured with the 2015 Henry Friesen Prize, he speaks with IDEAS host Paul Kennedy. **This episode orignally aired February 17, 2016.


Sir Paul Nurse describes the soon-to-be-opened Francis Crick Institute, in London and how it will encapsulate his own ideas about scientific research 1:42

 

"Scientists need to be creative. They need to be skeptical. They need to be honest and transparent. And in my mind they need to be courteous. In scientific dispute, it's very important that you argue and disagree. It's fine to say that somebody's idea is stupid. It is not fine to say they are stupid."


Sir Paul Nurse has been the President of prestigious Rockefeller University, in New York, and of the venerable Royal Society, in Great Britain. He's won the Einstein World Award for Science, and is a foreign academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is the Chief Executive of the Francis Crick Institute in London.

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