The 1982 CBC Massey Lectures, "Indefensible Weapons"

Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future.  Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race.  They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and...

Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future.  Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race.  They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and that crucial assumptions made about human behavior in relation to the weapons are false.

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Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future. Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race. They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and that crucial assumptions made about human behavior in relation to the weapons are false. 34:13
Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future. Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race. They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and that crucial assumptions made about human behavior in relation to the weapons are false. 36:56
Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future. Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race. They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and that crucial assumptions made about human behavior in relation to the weapons are false. 39:16
Our dependence on nuclear weapons, the disease of "nuclearism," undermines national security, destroys political legitimacy, and psychologically impairs a future. Robert Jay Lifton and Richard Falk provide a psychological and political antidote to the nuclear arms race. They argue that the premises of nuclear strategy held by both the superpowers are wrong, that recovery from nuclear war is illusory, and that crucial assumptions made about human behavior in relation to the weapons are false. 35:41

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