Talking Philosophy: War and Peace, Part 1

We all know that 'war is hell' but does this mean that peace -- at any price -- will do? Philosophers Michael Blake, Simone Chambers, Arthur Ripstein and IDEAS Executive Producer Greg Kelly grapple with the nature, the rules, and the challenges of war and peace, yesterday and today. Part 2 airs Wednesday, March 16.
July 20, 1944: American soldiers dashing through a smoke screen, whilst taking the Normandy village of Saintenay. (Fred Ramage/Keystone/Getty Images)
Listen to the full episode53:59

We all know that 'war is hell' but does this mean that peace -- at any price -- will do? Philosophers Michael Blake, Simone Chambers, Arthur Ripstein and IDEAS Executive Producer Greg Kelly grapple with the nature, the rules, and the challenges of war and peace, yesterday and today. Part 2 airs Wednesday, March 16. **This episode originally aired November 12, 2015.


Part 1: The Morality of War (March 9)

Part 2: The Meaning of Peace (March 16)


Michael Blake
Michael Blake is a Professor of Philosophy and Public Affairs; he is also the Director of the University of Washington's Program on Values in Society. He received his bachelor degree in Philosophy and Economics from the University of Toronto, and a PhD from Stanford University. He also obtained some legal training at Yale Law School, before running away to become a philosopher.  Blake is jointly appointed to the Department of Philosophy and to the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington. He was previously a faculty member at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and held positions in the Center for Ethics and the Professions and the Carr Center for Human Rights. 

Simone Chambers
Simone Chambers is a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine.  She received her BA from McGill University and her MA and PhD from Columbia University.  Prior to moving to Irvine she was Director of the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto. She is the author, editor and co-editor of a number of books including most recently Dissent on Core Beliefs: Religious and Secular Perspectives (Cambridge, 2015). Her primary areas of scholarship include democratic theory, ethics, secularism, rhetoric, civility and the public sphere.  She is presently writing a book entitled An Ethics of Public Discourse, which investigates the relationship between political speech and democracy.

Arthur Ripstein
Arthur Ripstein is Professor of Law and Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He received a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh, a degree in law from Yale, and an undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba. Professor Ripstein's research and teaching interests include torts, legal theory, and political philosophy. In addition to numerous articles in legal theory and political philosophy, he is the author of Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy (Harvard 2009) and Equality, Responsibility and the Law (Cambridge 1999). His newest book, Private Wrongs, will be published by Harvard University Press in the Spring of 2016. He is currently writing a book on Immanuel Kant's account of the law and morality of war.



Panelists, Arthur Ripstein, Simone Chambers, Michael Blake, and IDEAS Executive Producer Greg Kelly. (Sinisa Jolic)

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