Past Episodes

  • Thursday June 22, 2017

    Policing: Old cops, new expectations

    Policing: Old cops, new expectations

    Counter-terrorism, fighting cybercrime, policing highly diverse societies: Can the police do it all? Should the police do it all? Do the police want to do it all? An Ideas/Munk School of Global Affairs discussion on the implications, the challenges and the trade-offs for the police, for justice and for all of us.

    Posted: Jun 22, 2017 1:57 PM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 22, 2017 1:36 PM ET
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  • Wednesday June 21, 2017

    Dr. Tracey Lindberg

    Cree academic and novelist Tracey Lindberg on reconciliation before reconciliation

    Dr. Tracey Lindberg calls it (W)rec(k)-onciliation, and uses that as the title and theme of a lecture she delivered at Vancouver Island University, the second in an Indigenous Speakers Series. Dr. Lindberg is a Cree academic and writer. In her talk and an interview with Paul Kennedy she explores the importance of reconciliation with self, with community, and with Indigenous peoples in advance of reconciliation with Canada.

    Posted: Jun 21, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 21, 2017 10:49 AM ET
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  • Tuesday June 20, 2017

    Go with the flow - The Sand Engine

    Go with the flow: Using nature to help fight climate change

    Our climate is changing and because of it, our oceans and rivers are rising. In the past, we used large, man-made infrastructure to keep the water at bay. But maybe instead of trying to fight off nature, we should start working with it. Ideas contributor Anik See explores projects across The Netherlands, in northern Spain, and in New Orleans

    Posted: Jun 20, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 20, 2017 1:39 PM ET
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  • Monday June 19, 2017

    Building Tension - downtown Halifax

    Building Tension: Preserving the past and constructing the future

    Across Canada, our city cores are becoming indistinguishable jumbles of tall glass buildings - new and shiny always seems to beat heritage or repurposing. City planning sometimes ignores scale and community. Four prominent and insightful architects discuss ways to tear down the edifices of modern planning and design.

    Posted: Jun 19, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 19, 2017 12:56 PM ET
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  • Friday June 16, 2017

    Lascaux Cave painting

    Vestigial Tale, Part 1: What science tells us about the human drive to tell stories

    Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective. Why are we humans such suckers for a good story? Literary critics find the answer in story structure, characters, and plotlines. The literary Darwinists find the answer in evolution.

    Posted: Jun 16, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Aug 11, 2016 8:14 AM ET
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  • Thursday June 15, 2017

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    Policing: To serve or protect?

    Relations between the public and the police are strained today: from charges of police violence, abuse and racial bias to calls for transparency and greater police accountability. At the same time, we expect the cops to take on new missions: counter-terrorism, cybercrime, and policing a changing society.

    Posted: Jun 15, 2017 4:08 PM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 15, 2017 12:56 PM ET
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  • Wednesday June 14, 2017

    Distant Future Warnings - Garth Mullins

    Distant Future Warnings: The challenges of communicating with eternity

    Radioactive waste and toxic mining byproducts will remain deadly for thousands of years – maybe forever. Deep in the arsenic-contaminated underground at Giant Mine near Yellowknife, contributor Garth Mullins wonders how we can warn the distant future. Is it even possible to send messages that can outlast governments, languages, cultures, nations – maybe even humans?

    Posted: Jun 14, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 14, 2017 12:31 PM ET
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  • Tuesday June 13, 2017

    As You Like It - Newfoundland - Stratford Festival

    Newfoundland Jam: Shakespeare's "As You Like It" on the 'Rock'

    Shakespeare's English isn't quite like what we speak today, but we get it. So what happens when you set As You Like It in Newfoundland -- as they did at Stratford last year -- with the appropriate accents and a kitchen party? What are the challenges, and what can the play teach us that we perhaps didn't know before?

    Posted: Jun 13, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 13, 2017 1:34 PM ET
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  • Monday June 12, 2017

    Macbeth murdering King Duncan

    Lady and Lord Macbeth on trial: guilty or bewitched?

    Shakespeare's play tells us how Lord and Lady Macbeth plotted the killing of King Duncan. The Bard seems pretty clear it was murder. But was the killing of Duncan actually, legally, murder? We might say yeah, guilty as heck, but a lawyer might say — not so fast, maybe they were ... bewitched! The Macbeths on trial, from the Stratford Festival.

    Posted: Jun 12, 2017 10:41 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 12, 2017 1:07 PM ET
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  • Friday June 09, 2017

    Orchids: Ward’s Stanhopea

    Orchids: A love story

    Suggestive, romantic, sexy orchids! It turns out they're even sexier in their own world. Wily, deceptive, manipulating: get ready to travel between history and science, how we humans think about orchids and who they really are in nature among themselves. A celebration of all things orchid with contributing producer Marilyn Powell.

    Posted: Jun 09, 2017 4:15 PM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 09, 2017 3:27 PM ET
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  • Thursday June 08, 2017

    2017 Killam Prize Winners

    Pushing the Frontiers of Knowledge: The 2017 Killam Prize

    Once a year the Canada Council Killam Prize is bestowed on five of Canada's top academics in five different fields. Paul Kennedy interviews this year's winners and finds out what inspires them to break new ground. Passion, drive and creativity fuel Canada's intellectual heavyweights, no matter the field.

    Posted: Jun 08, 2017 11:23 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 08, 2017 2:56 PM ET
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  • Wednesday June 07, 2017

    Baseball

    Fail Better: What baseball can teach us about failure and community

    Baseball may have inspired more books than any other sport -- but none quite like philosopher Mark Kingwell's recently published, "Fail Better: Why Baseball Matters". It's the first book-length philosophical meditation on what has been called America's national pastime. Paul Kennedy takes him out to a ballgame, and discusses everything from RBIs, to the metaphysics of failure, and how Kingwell borrowed the title for his baseball book from a work by Samuel Beckett.

    Posted: Jun 07, 2017 11:03 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 07, 2017 12:29 PM ET
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  • Tuesday June 06, 2017

    Reading book

    The Challenge of Words: What is the future of literary writing in the digital age?

    In our hyperfast, overcaffeinated, 140 character, social-media-blasted, Facebook-overloaded age, there are still people writing serious books. The novel -- an art form that's centuries old -- still has the capacity to hold our attention from subway commute to library chair. But we tell ourselves we’re in a different era now. What’s to become of serious writing in the digital age?

    Posted: Jun 06, 2017 4:05 PM ET
    Last Updated: Jun 06, 2017 11:54 AM ET
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  • Monday June 05, 2017

    Susan Neiman

    Subversive thoughts for an infantile age: Susan Neiman

    They are known as MAMILS - middle-aged men in Lycra - and more and more of them are found on bicycles and in parks and pools. Are weekend warriors only getting in shape or are they one more public demonstration of lengthening adolescence? In her new book Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age, Paul Kennedy talks with philosopher Susan Neiman, who believes that "Having failed to create societies that our young want to grow up into, we idealize the stages of youth."

    Posted: Jun 05, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 28, 2015 11:48 AM ET
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  • Friday June 02, 2017

    Brexit Protester

    The Causes and Consequences of Brexit: Timothy Garton Ash

    Some have called it the unravelling of Europe, while others claim it may signal the end of liberalism. Brexit both surprised and confounded experts who never thought it would happen. Sound familiar? Timothy Garton Ash is an historian, political writer and newspaper columnist. He teaches at Oxford and Stanford, and delivered this talk, the Donner Canadian Foundation Lecture, in Toronto on November 21, 2016.

    Posted: Jun 02, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 26, 2017 10:38 AM ET
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  • Thursday June 01, 2017

    The Philosopher's Walk - Jean Talon Market

    The Philosopher's Walk with Frédéric Bouchard

    Frédéric Bouchard is philosopher of science and biology at the University of Montreal, and the perfect companion for a walk through the Jean Talon Market. The result is a fascinating discussion about mushrooms, unpasteurized goat cheese and honey bees, and how they can make you think about humankind's place in the universe in a whole different way.

    Posted: Jun 01, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 23, 2016 1:33 PM ET
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  • Tuesday May 30, 2017

    Afternoon of the Faun

    Nine minutes that changed the world

    In 1876, the poet Stéphane Mallarmé published a poem entitled "The Afternoon of a Faun". He doubted anyone could set it to music successfully. But composer Claude Debussy did exactly that. The music runs only about nine minutes long, but it helped give birth to the modern era as we know it.

    Posted: May 30, 2017 4:20 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 31, 2017 2:38 PM ET
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  • Tuesday May 30, 2017

    Furbaby

    Bringing up furbaby: The evolution from family pet to pet family

    There are now more pets than children in North American homes, and lavish dog beds and catnip mice are taking the place of bassinets and rattles. Is this turn from traditional to furry families simply a passing fad, or a response to the stresses of modern life? Or the natural evolution of our relationship with animals? Kelley Jo Burke explores what we're really saying about who we are and what we need, when we start bringing up 'furbabies.'

    Posted: May 30, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 30, 2017 12:21 PM ET
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  • Monday May 29, 2017

    History Derailed: Egypt Tahrir Square 2011

    History Derailed: Understanding the Messy Middle East

    The Arab Spring was supposed to be a turning point for the Arab Middle East. And it was. But history appears to have taken a wrong turn. Again. American journalist Robert F. Worth joins Paul Kennedy in conversation about his book, "A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS". Worth is the 2017 winner of the Lionel Gelber Prize.

    Posted: May 29, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 29, 2017 2:01 PM ET
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  • Friday May 26, 2017

    CBI-AM Sydney Nova Scotia Opening Broadcast

    Does public broadcasting have a future?

    It seems the idea of public service journalism is under fire everywhere. So three major public broadcasters came together to talk about their collective future at a forum held in Toronto by the Canadian Journalism Foundation: Jennifer McGuire, General Manager and Editor-in-Chief of CBC News, James Harding, Director of News and Current Affairs of the BBC, and Michael Oreskes, Senior Vice-President of News and Editorial Director of NPR. The discussion was moderated by Simon Houpt of The Globe and Mail.

    Posted: May 26, 2017 5:19 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 26, 2017 2:43 PM ET
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  • Thursday May 25, 2017

    Writing in Worried Times

    Writing in worried times: GG Award winners share their anxieties

    They may be successful writers, but that doesn't mean the 2016 Governor General's Literary Award winners are immune from worry about the world around us. Five authors share some brand new work on that theme, and explain how they grapple with the cultural issues that make them most anxious. Presented by IDEAS and CBC Books, with the Canada Council for the Arts.

    Posted: May 25, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Dec 13, 2016 12:45 PM ET
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  • Wednesday May 24, 2017

    Guantanamo Bay Camp Delta

    After Guantanamo: Dennis Edney on defending Omar Khadr

    In 2002, a 15-year-old boy was caught by American forces in Afghanistan after a firefight, and imprisoned in Guantanamo for the next 13 years. The boy was Omar Khadr, and his then little-known lawyer was Dennis Edney from Edmonton. From the Stratford Festival, Dennis Edney talks with Paul Kennedy about a life-changing experience that contains a challenge for us all.

    Posted: May 24, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 01, 2017 11:46 AM ET
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  • Tuesday May 23, 2017

    Commute from Hell - Toronto subway delay

    Commute from Hell

    Work can’t help but be affected when people spend almost as much time commuting as they spend on the job. How can a stressful commute impact a person's professional performance? What does it ultimately do to family life, or social engagements? Another in IDEAS' ongoing annual consideration of work-related mobility issues looks at the terrible experience of Toronto commuters.

    Posted: May 23, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 09, 2017 3:53 PM ET
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  • Monday May 22, 2017

    Ideas from the trenches - referendums

    Yes and No: The problem of bad referendums

    From Brexit to Turkey, the use of referendums is on the rise around the world. They're seen as a way of getting politicians and experts out of the way to let 'the people' decide on major policy decisions, and making democracy work more directly. Leah Trueblood is a PhD student at Oxford University. She warns that ill-conceived referendums are actually dangerous for democracies.

    Posted: May 22, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 22, 2017 8:25 AM ET
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  • Friday May 19, 2017

    Myth of Victory - Fall of Bagdad

    The Myth of Victory: How do we know when we've won?

    Some people argue that World War One was just the opening act for the Second World War, and perhaps World War Three is just around the corner. And what about wars of ideology? The Soviet Union doesn't seem to be dead yet, and nor is Communism. Even if we defeat ISIS, does that mean the idea of an Islamic state is finished? Stephen Toope, Janice Stein and Hugh Segal in conversation from the Stratford Festival.

    Posted: May 19, 2017 11:53 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 19, 2017 12:23 PM ET
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  • Thursday May 18, 2017

    Creative Minds

    How art shapes history

    Toronto CBC radio host Matt Galloway talks with architect Sir David Adjaye, visual artist Christi Belcourt, author Junot Díaz and filmmaker Paul Gross. The group met onstage at Toronto's Massey Hall as part of the Creative Minds series, produced in partnership with CBC, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Banff Centre and Massey Hall. Their focus: current global politics and how art shapes our understanding of place, history and progress.

    Posted: May 18, 2017 4:29 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 18, 2017 3:42 PM ET
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  • Wednesday May 17, 2017

    Buffy the vampire slayer

    Why "Buffyworld" still matters

    It's been 20 years since a midriff-baring California cheerleader leapt onto our television screens and became a riveting woman warrior - slaying vampires, demons and monsters. Her fantastical enemies were subversive metaphors for a corrupt and authoritarian culture. Today, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" remains the most-studied show in television history. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell revisits the legacy of "Buffyworld".

    Posted: May 17, 2017 2:48 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 17, 2017 12:34 PM ET
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  • Tuesday May 16, 2017

    Self-Taught Philosopher - Ibn Tufayl

    The Self-Taught Philosopher: How a 900-year-old Arabic tale inspired the Enlightenment

    Naheed Mustafa tells the story of Ibn Tufayl, a philosopher-physician from the 12th century. He wrote a novel called "Hayy ibn Yaqzan" -- which may be the most influential story you've never heard.

    Posted: May 16, 2017 4:34 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 16, 2017 12:29 PM ET
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  • Monday May 15, 2017

    Seed Banks

    Seed Banks: Re-sowing paradise

    In the face of climate change and declining biodiversity, one of humanity's oldest cultural practices – seed saving – has a new urgency. Maria Zytaruk explores how preserving seeds reflects the deepest of human fears and hopes, whether it's done in a high-tech seed bank in Britain, or a simple storage closet lined with jars at a convent in Kingston.

    Posted: May 15, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Dec 16, 2016 3:32 PM ET
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  • Friday May 12, 2017

    Near death experience

    Decoding Death: The science and significance of near death experiences

    People have reported "near death experiences", or NDE's, over centuries and across cultures. The nature of them has historically been the territory of religion and philosophy. But now science has staked its claim in the discussion. And the questions the research asks are profound: where is consciousness produced, in the brain, or somewhere else? Can consciousness continue to exist even after the heart and brain have stopped working?

    Posted: May 12, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 12, 2017 5:10 PM ET
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  • Thursday May 11, 2017

    Dust to Dust - Cemetery

    Dust to Dust: Notes on rituals for the dead

    The human body at death: it looks like us, but it is not us. So what are we to do with it? How do we meet the needs of the dead and our own? Barbara Nichol talks with anthropologists and historians about the role that ritual plays in our attempts to cope with the conundrum of the corpse.

    Posted: May 11, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 26, 2016 2:20 PM ET
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  • Wednesday May 10, 2017

    Capitalism's End Times - Poverty

    Surviving Post-Capitalism: Coping, hoping, doping & shopping

    The signs are troubling: the ever-widening chasm between the ultra-rich and everyone else. Mass protests. Political upheaval and social division. It looks as though the rocky marriage between capitalism and democracy is doomed, at least according to Wolfgang Streeck. In conversation with Paul Kennedy about his book How Will Capitalism End?, he makes the unnerving case that capitalism is now at a point where it cannot survive itself.

    Posted: May 10, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 10, 2017 3:35 PM ET
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  • Tuesday May 09, 2017

    The Munk Debates on Geopolitics

    The decline and fall of the liberal international order

    For decades, global affairs have been moulded by ideas about the mutual benefits of an interdependent world. But the pillars of liberal internationalism are cracking under the rise of nationalist politics and other challenges. Is this the beginning of the end of the liberal international order? In a head-to-head Munk Debate, historian Niall Ferguson says Yes, the old order is collapsing, while commentator Fareed Zakaria argues No, there's life yet in liberal ideals.

    Posted: May 09, 2017 12:30 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 09, 2017 2:50 PM ET
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  • Monday May 08, 2017

    Mohamed Fahmy

    Media in the Age of Terrorism: Mohamed Fahmy

    For 438 days, Mohamed Fahmy was locked away in Egypt's notorious Tora prison, living side-by-side with members of the Muslim Brotherhood, al-Qaeda and ISIS. The Egyptian-Canadian's arrest, trials and eventual release, garnered international attention. A strange turn of the camera for the award-winning journalist. But his jail experience, along with his war coverage, has given him riveting insight into the Age of Terrorism, delivered in his compelling 2016 Dalton Camp Lecture.

    Posted: May 08, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 31, 2017 12:33 PM ET
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  • Friday May 05, 2017

    Génération Identitaire - France Extreme Right

    Yesterday and Tomorrow: The rise of the extreme right in France, Part 3

    The loudest people supporting Marine Le Pen are the young. And the extreme right is on the rise again. Unemployed and disaffected, they're rejecting the elites who have failed them, and instead are embracing an old mantra: France for the French. What that mantra really means for France now, and what it will mean in the future, are what this election is about. Part 3 of Philip Coulter's series on the rise of the extreme right in France.

    Posted: May 05, 2017 11:07 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 05, 2017 12:31 PM ET
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  • Thursday May 04, 2017

    Guglielmo Marconi

    Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World

    Our phones, our laptops, even our cars communicate invisibly through the air. Our wireless world owes thanks to an Italian teenager who went on to win the Nobel Prize and changed how wars were fought. But Guglielmo Marconi also supported the rise of Italian fascism. McGill professor Marc Raboy has just published a major biography of Marconi and he takes IDEAS producer David Gutnick on a tour of Marconi's influences in Montreal.

    Posted: May 04, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 10, 2016 12:23 PM ET
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  • Wednesday May 03, 2017

    Hildegard Westerkamp

    How opening our ears can open our minds: Hildegard Westerkamp

    Soundscape composer Hildegard Westerkamp hears the world differently than most people. Where many of us might hear noise, she uncovers extraordinary beauty and meaning. It's all in how we listen to our environment. Paul Kennedy joins Hildegard Westerkamp on a sound-walk through Vancouver's downtown eastside, and explores how opening our ears to our surroundings can open our minds.

    Posted: May 03, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 02, 2017 4:41 PM ET
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  • Tuesday May 02, 2017

    Liberty Leading the people - Delcroix painting

    Liberty leading the people: The rise of the extreme right in France, Part 2

    The famous painting by Delacroix shows a triumphant Liberté, with a French flag, urging her army towards us, the viewers. We can either join them, or flee. The painting celebrates the July revolution of 1830, and since then Liberté herself has become an enduring icon of France.

    Posted: May 02, 2017 11:25 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 02, 2017 1:35 PM ET
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  • Monday May 01, 2017

    The Enright Files on the Six-Day War

    The Enright Files: fifty years after the Six-Day War

    The history of Israel and its relations with its Arab neighbours remains far from settled. And it’s not only the history of the past 70 years. A history that goes back millennia still infuses the conflicts and geopolitical debates between Israel, its allies and enemies in the Middle East and the global community at large. As the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War approaches, The Enright Files revisits interviews about that war and the way it and the fallout from Israel’s other conflicts still weigh on the state of Israel today.

    Posted: May 01, 2017 12:31 PM ET
    Last Updated: May 01, 2017 2:46 PM ET
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  • Friday April 28, 2017

    Whistleblowing

    Don't Shoot the Messenger: the value of whistleblowing

    Recorded at Ryerson University's Centre for Free Expression, Paul Kennedy hosts a panel on why whistleblowers are vital to the public interest...and how their exposure of wrongdoing can ultimately be helpful, even to their workplace. Investigator Sandy Boucher, international expert Anna Myers, and Canadian advocate David Hutton join forces to explain why they believe whistleblowers should be heard and protected.

    Posted: Apr 28, 2017 1:44 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 28, 2017 3:03 PM ET
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  • Thursday April 27, 2017

    Belarus Chornobyl Radioactive Food

    Chernobyl Remembered, Part 2

    On the night of April 26, 1986, a routine test at the RBMK #4 reactor in Chernobyl, Ukraine, went badly wrong: in a fatal convergence of bad design and operator error, the reactor core overheated and exploded, scattering radioactive debris high into the sky, from where it eventually spread over most of western Europe.

    Posted: Apr 27, 2017 12:30 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 27, 2017 2:47 PM ET
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  • Wednesday April 26, 2017

    UKRAINE CHERNOBYL Nuclear Power Plant radiation Pripyat

    Chernobyl Remembered, Part 1

    On the night of April 26, 1986, a routine test at the RBMK #4 reactor in Chernobyl, Ukraine, went badly wrong: in a fatal convergence of bad design and operator error, the reactor core overheated and exploded, scattering radioactive debris high into the sky, from where it eventually spread over most of western Europe.

    Posted: Apr 26, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 26, 2017 1:54 PM ET
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  • Tuesday April 25, 2017

    motorcyle-yourself-featured

    The Motorcycle is Yourself: Revisiting 'Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance'

    Robert Pirsig's 'Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance' has been called the most widely read book of philosophy ever written. Forty years after its publication, contributor Tim Wilson revisits an extraordinary interview he did with its author, for still vital advice on how to live....

    Posted: Apr 25, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 25, 2017 8:03 AM ET
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  • Monday April 24, 2017

    Karel Ancerl - conducts the Theresienstadt orchestra

    Notes in a bottle: reviving music composed in the Holocaust

    Megan Williams tells us about composers Victor Ullmann and Gideon Klein who died in the Holocaust; of their struggle to create under the most horrific conditions; and of a group of modern-day scholars and musicians dedicated to reviving their long-silenced music.

    Posted: Apr 24, 2017 12:52 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 24, 2017 3:28 PM ET
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  • Friday April 21, 2017

    Marine Le Pen Rally

    Children of the Fatherland: The rise of the extreme right in France, Part 1

    The French go to the polls on April 23 to begin the selection of their next president. In the volatile world of French politics, the stakes seem higher than ever, as Marine Le Pen is poised to make history. After decades in the political wilderness, her party, the extreme right-wing Front National, just might pull off an upset.

    Posted: Apr 21, 2017 10:43 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 21, 2017 3:21 PM ET
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  • Thursday April 20, 2017

    The rise of the anti-establishment - Jobs or Income now

    The Rise of the Anti-Establishment: Where do we go from here?

    "It is a deep tragedy, bordering on calamity, that we have come to this point," says Robert Reich of the Trump presidency. In a lecture at the University of British Columbia, followed by an interview with Paul Kennedy, the former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at University of California at Berkeley details how understanding the circumstances that led to the election of Donald Trump can help shape a new democratic political sensibility.

    Posted: Apr 20, 2017 10:20 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 20, 2017 2:41 PM ET
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  • Wednesday April 19, 2017

    Drone warfare

    Drone Warfare: Is Killing Terrorists Legal?

    On 30 September 2011, American military drone operators at an Air Force base in Nevada spotted Anwar al-Awlaki in northern Yemen. The radical Muslim cleric -- and American citizen -- was in a desert more than 13,000 kilometres away, sitting near an SUV. Awlaki spotted the drones and ran to the vehicle. Back in Nevada, an operator clicked a button. And within seconds, two Hellfire missiles blew the SUV to smithereens.

    Posted: Apr 19, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: May 11, 2016 1:51 PM ET
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  • Tuesday April 18, 2017

    Age of Anger - Pankaj Mishra

    Globalized Anger: The Enlightenment's Unwanted Child

    Trumpism. Hindu nationalism. ISIS. Chinese expansionism. People everywhere seem fed up with the status quo, and their anger and intolerance are finding political expression. But why? Pankaj Mishra believes that the current unrest isn't about any so-called "clash of civilizations" between the enlightened and unenlightened. He thinks the globalized anger is the legitimate offspring of the Enlightenment itself.

    Posted: Apr 18, 2017 11:32 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 18, 2017 2:55 PM ET
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  • Monday April 17, 2017

    Fake news

    The Truth about "Post-Truth"

    The election of Donald Trump has ignited talk that we're now living in a "post-truth" era. But are we? Where does the idea that the truth no longer exists come from? Or the notion that the truth doesn't matter anymore? Host Paul Kennedy talks to thinkers who argue that the story began years earlier, with a kind of collective identity crisis: authoritarianism can become attractive when you no longer remember who you are.

    Posted: Apr 17, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 19, 2017 3:37 PM ET
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  • Friday April 14, 2017

    Bread - French Baguettes

    Bread: salvation or damnation?

    Bread is a simple food and a staple item across the world. Bread is life. But for some, it represents a wrong turn in our species' evolution. Through conversation with bakers, religious leaders, historians and bread aficionados, producer Veronica Simmonds asks whether bread has led us to salvation or damnation.

    Posted: Apr 14, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 14, 2017 8:15 AM ET
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  • Thursday April 13, 2017

    The Matter of Meat

    The Matter of Meat: A history of pros and cons

    Eating meat: some say we've evolved to do it. It's in our DNA. It's how we got our big brains. Yet others, including Pythagoras in the 6th century BC, and even Dr. Frankenstein's "monster", have argued that eating meat is bad for our bodies, cruel to animals, and toxic to the planet. Now -- perhaps more than ever -- clear-cut answers can be hard to come by when it comes to the matter of meat. Kevin Ball serves up the arguments.

    Posted: Apr 13, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 25, 2016 4:17 PM ET
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  • Wednesday April 12, 2017

    Muslim Brotherhood Protest

    Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 2

    It’s a provocative argument among Islamic Scholars: was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim- dominated countries? Many would say no. But author Shadi Hamid, an American Muslim and self-described liberal, says the rise of Islamist parties is inevitable.

    Posted: Apr 12, 2017 3:40 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 12, 2017 2:33 PM ET
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  • Tuesday April 11, 2017

    Biocentrism

    Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death

    Paul Kennedy has his understanding of reality turned-upside-down by Dr. Robert Lanza in this paradigm-shifting hour. Dr. Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product.

    Posted: Apr 11, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 04, 2016 11:46 AM ET
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  • Monday April 10, 2017

    Brother XII - De Courcy Island

    The Dream of Brother XII

    Sun-dappled paradise in summer, sodden purgatory in winter, the ruggedly beautiful British Columbia coast has long attracted utopian visionaries. Case in point: Edward Wilson, better known as the infamous religious cult leader Brother XII, a wayward 1920s theosophist at the centre of one of the most bizarre interludes in Canadian history. Jen Moss explores what happens when lofty ideals crash against B.C's rocky shores.

    Posted: Apr 10, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jul 08, 2016 11:10 AM ET
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  • Friday April 07, 2017

    Vimy at 100 - Canadians at Vimy

    Vimy at 100: Myth vs. Reality

    It's been a century since Canada's bloody victory at Vimy Ridge during World War One. Since then, Vimy has become synonymous with the birth of Canada as a nation. But historian Tim Cook, author of Vimy: The Battle and the Legend, peels back the layers of myth-making around Vimy to reveal its complex -- at times contradictory -- history.

    Posted: Apr 07, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 07, 2017 3:30 PM ET
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  • Thursday April 06, 2017

    Trump protest

    Reflections on Global Affairs: Is the world really falling apart?

    The news has been bleak: Brexit, populism, terrorism and, an America divided. The war in Syria continues to rage and the number of refugees and other migrants world-wide is soaring. Then, there's economic inequality and a host of other big concerns. It's tempting to think that everything is falling apart. But is that really true?

    Posted: Apr 06, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Dec 19, 2016 1:35 PM ET
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  • Wednesday April 05, 2017

    Islamist Persistance - Protest in Egypt

    Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 1

    It’s a provocative argument among Islamic Scholars: was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim- dominated countries? Many would say no. But author Shadi Hamid, an American Muslim and self-described liberal, says the rise of Islamist parties is inevitable.

    Posted: Apr 05, 2017 3:43 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 05, 2017 1:12 PM ET
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  • Tuesday April 04, 2017

    Inside the GPO

    Ireland 1916: how 800 years of British rule led to violent rebellion

    On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, the streets of Dublin were transformed into a war zone. About 1,200 Irish rebels rose up against 20,000 British troops in a doomed attempt to throw off centuries of British colonial rule. The Easter Rising may have failed in that moment, but the brutality of the British response so disgusted and angered the Irish that Irish independence became inevitable.

    Posted: Apr 04, 2017 3:33 PM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 04, 2017 10:15 AM ET
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  • Monday April 03, 2017

    Jennifer Welsh, 2016 CBC Massey Lecturer

    The Return of History: Your Questions

    The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions -- and thoughtful answers -- in each city on the tour. In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by you, our radio and online audiences, and put to Massey Lecturer Jennifer Welsh by Paul Kennedy.

    Posted: Apr 03, 2017 11:13 AM ET
    Last Updated: Apr 03, 2017 12:26 PM ET
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  • Friday March 31, 2017

    2016 CBC Massey Lectures: Return of Inequality - Lecture 5

    Lecture 5: The Return of Inequality

    There's a myth that great wealth enables our economies to grow, but wealth can actually stand in the way of economic development; inequity can slow us down. Fairness lies at the heart of liberal democracy, and in the face of unfairness, we rebel. Unfairness makes us work less hard to create a good society. Economic inequality inevitably translates into political inequality, which is not what we thought we were working towards.

    Posted: Mar 31, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 04, 2016 11:49 AM ET
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  • Thursday March 30, 2017

    2016 CBC Massey Lectures: Return of the Cold War - Lecture 4

    Lecture 4: The Return of the Cold War

    Fukuyama's essay was inspired by the apparent collapse of the Soviet Union in the late 1980's. But the Soviet Union -- or the idea of it, the muscle behind it -- is back. The Cold War, a kind of standoff between two superpowers, is not unique in human history, but today's version of the Cold War is triggering a domino effect -- instability in Ukraine and the Middle East, the return of a threat to liberal democracy.

    Posted: Mar 30, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 14, 2016 10:28 AM ET
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  • Wednesday March 29, 2017

    2016 CBC Massey Lectures: The Return of Flight - Lecture 3

    Lecture 3: The Return of Mass Flight

    Millions are on the move. Entire populations are leaving their home countries to find a better life elsewhere, creating two problems: what are we to do about the failed states left in the wake of this mass migration, and, what are the more stable Western nations supposed to do with this great mass of refugees and economic migrants at and within the borders? Both closing the borders and opening the borders raises questions about human rights, and the nature of the modern state.

    Posted: Mar 29, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 02, 2016 12:28 PM ET
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  • Tuesday March 28, 2017

    2016 CBC Massey Lectures - Lecture 2: The Return to Barbarism

    Lecture 2: The Return of Barbarism

    Half a decade ago, we saw the rise of freedom movements in a number of countries -- Egypt, Tunisia, Libya -- but today those gains seem mostly lost. Authoritarian regimes have been erasing the progress in human rights and democracy that we thought we were seeing, and the rules that govern conflict and maintain global peace are being erased.

    Posted: Mar 28, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 01, 2016 1:01 PM ET
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  • Monday March 27, 2017

    2016 Massey Lectures - The Return to History - Lecture 1

    Lecture 1: The Return of History

    We see human rights in danger all over the world, little progress in social mobility, the rise of right-wing and centralist governments and the mass fleeing of peoples towards western countries. If there is no end point of political development, and the world is unpredictable, then where do we look for the shape of the future? In the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, Jennifer Welsh explores how pronouncements about the "end of history" may have been premature.

    Posted: Mar 27, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 27, 2017 10:07 AM ET
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  • Friday March 24, 2017

    Temple of Bel - Palmyra, Syria

    Saving Syria: keeping war-torn culture alive

    Destruction and displacement -- that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and the smell of jasmine and tarragon. Maamoun Abdulkarim risks his life rescuing stolen ancient artefacts. Ghada Alatrash translates the work of poets still coping with life in Syria. And journalist, Alia Malek writes about the history of Syria through the story of her family.

    Posted: Mar 24, 2017 10:57 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 24, 2017 2:33 PM ET
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  • Thursday March 23, 2017

    Return of Michif Boy

    Return of the Michif Boy: Confronting Métis trauma

    PhD student Jesse Thistle was once a high school drop-out who spent more than a decade in and out of homeless shelters, consumed by drug and alcohol addiction. By reconnecting with his birth mother and spending time with his Métis elders he came to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma. His award-winning historical research shines a light on the struggles and the resilience of Métis 'road-side allowance' communities in northern Saskatchewan.

    Posted: Mar 23, 2017 10:42 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 24, 2017 5:11 PM ET
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  • Wednesday March 22, 2017

    2016 Sobey Art Award - Jeremy Shaw

    The 2016 Sobey Art Award: The New Masters, Part 2

    In today's art we often glimpse the future. The Sobey Art Award celebrates the best in Canadian contemporary art by artists aged 40 and under, awarding a total of $100,000 to five selected artists -- of which half goes to the winner. IDEAS profiles the five regional finalists.

    Posted: Mar 22, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Dec 22, 2016 11:57 AM ET
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  • Tuesday March 21, 2017

    The Inquisition

    A Peasant vs The Inquisition: Cheese, Worms and the Birth of Micro-history

    Celebrated historian Carlo Ginzburg uncovers the past by telling the stories of the marginalized, the forgotten, and the suppressed. His most famous work, "The Cheese and the Worms", recounts the story of a 16th century miller who was tried twice by the Inquisition and eventually put to death. The trial records reveal a fascinating worldview that might have been lost forever -- and given the Fascist persecution of Ginzburg's family, he's got a stake in revealing histories that would otherwise be lost.

    Posted: Mar 21, 2017 10:44 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 21, 2017 4:22 PM ET
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  • Monday March 20, 2017

    Albie Sachs

    Soft Vengeance: Albie Sachs on loving your enemy into defeat

    Longtime freedom fighter, activist, lawyer and judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court, Albie Sachs has lived many lives. Injured by a car bomb in Mozambique, he had every right to be bitter and angry, but he turned instead to "soft vengeance"- loving your enemy into defeat, working to make a country that would be fair for everyone.

    Posted: Mar 20, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 30, 2016 12:34 PM ET
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  • Friday March 17, 2017

    Generation Mars - Mars Colony

    Generation Mars, Part 2

    The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We'll be driven by a desire to find life -- or what remains of it -- and to colonize the planet. Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving -- and living -- on the Red Planet.

    Posted: Mar 17, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 17, 2017 10:12 AM ET
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  • Thursday March 16, 2017

    The Middle Finger - Maurizio Cattelan

    Expletive Repeated: Why Swearing Matters

    Profanity was once considered rude and crude -- a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.

    Posted: Mar 16, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 16, 2017 1:55 PM ET
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  • Wednesday March 15, 2017

    2016 Sobey Art Award - Brenda Draney (Evacuation)

    The 2016 Sobey Art Award: The New Masters, Part 1

    In today's art we often glimpse the future. The Sobey Art Award celebrates the best in Canadian contemporary art by artists aged 40 and under, awarding a total of $100,000 to five selected artists -- of which half goes to the winner. Over two shows, IDEAS profiles the five regional finalists.

    Posted: Mar 15, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Dec 21, 2016 1:22 PM ET
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  • Tuesday March 14, 2017

    Dutch Election - Rally

    The Immigrants: The rise of the extreme right in the Netherlands, Part 2

    Rabin Baldewsingh came to The Netherlands as a 13-year-old, a Hindu from the Dutch colony of Surinam in South America. Today he's Deputy Mayor of The Hague. The Dutch are struggling with a rise of right-wing, anti-immigrant sentiment on the eve of national elections. Part two of Philip Coulter's series.

    Posted: Mar 14, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 14, 2017 2:00 PM ET
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  • Monday March 13, 2017

    Making Marco Polo

    Making Marco Polo

    Almost everything we think we know about Marco Polo - traveller, explorer, the man who brought the wonders of the East to the West - is being questioned. Tony Luppino searches for the real man and story behind the legendary wanderer, and discovers someone even more interesting and unexpected.

    Posted: Mar 13, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 21, 2016 10:48 AM ET
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  • Friday March 10, 2017

    Mars Daybreak at Gale Crater

    Generation Mars, Part 1

    The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We'll be driven by a desire to find life -- or what remains of it -- and to colonize the planet. Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving -- and living -- on the Red Planet.

    Posted: Mar 10, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 20, 2016 1:54 PM ET
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  • Thursday March 09, 2017

    Netherlands Election -2017 - Dutch Right

    The Night Watch: The Rise of the Extreme Right in The Netherlands, Part 1

    In 1642, Rembrandt painted a masterpiece featuring Dutch men preparing for military duty at the height of the war of independence from Spain. Its an icon of democracy in The Netherlands, the reminder of a founding moment in history, of the values of tolerance and nationhood. But now, approaching this year's national elections, the Netherlands -- like many countries -- is experiencing an explosion of right-wing populism, fueled by the anti-immigrant rhetoric of Geert Wilders. And the nation is torn.

    Posted: Mar 09, 2017 4:33 PM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 09, 2017 1:16 PM ET
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  • Wednesday March 08, 2017

    Alice Munro

    The Lives of Women, Readers and Alice Munro

    To mark International Women's Day, IDEAS eavesdrops on a group of women in St. John's, Newfoundland. They've gathered on a cold, autumn night for their regular book club. Over snacks, wine and tea, they discuss Alice Munro's work, and how her stories illuminate some of the deepest issues in their own lives. Munro's uncanny ability to shine light on darkened recesses of our inner lives earned her the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013.

    Posted: Mar 08, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 08, 2017 2:30 PM ET
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  • Tuesday March 07, 2017

    Tedium is the Message

    The Tedium is the Message

    It's never been easier to banish the feeling of boredom -- at least for a moment. But some fear our weapons of mass distraction could lead to an epidemic of ennui and ADD. Contributor Peter Mitton examines boredom and discovers a little-understood universal state of mind. From its obvious downsides and unexpected upsides, to its evolutionary origins and the way it's shaping our future -- boredom is anything but dull.

    Posted: Mar 07, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 22, 2016 12:51 PM ET
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  • Monday March 06, 2017

    Simone de Beavoir & Jean Paul Sarte

    How Existentialist and Conservative Philosophers Think About Freedom

    While the study of philosophy may seem more peripheral to everyday culture than ever in the 21st Century, the past hundred years saw a proliferation of schools of philosophical thought. None had the popular reach of existentialism, and few had greater impact on politics and debates on social issues than the various branches of conservatism - in many ways, the opposite of existentialism. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about, and with, existentialist and conservative philosophers.

    Posted: Mar 06, 2017 12:39 PM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 06, 2017 1:12 PM ET
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  • Friday March 03, 2017

    Claiming Space - India Subway - Women

    Claiming Space

    Public spaces, from parks to sidewalks to transit, have a huge impact on millions of women around the world. They can help make life enjoyable and safe, or dangerous -- sometimes even lethal. Contributor Megan Williams travels from India to Vienna to talk to sociologists, city planners, and cultural historians. She reveals how the conception and design of public space...

    Posted: Mar 03, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 07, 2014 12:00 AM ET
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  • Thursday March 02, 2017

    Syrian Refugees

    Beyond the Huddled Masses

    Where we come from, and how we got here from there, shapes who we are. From the 2016 Stratford Festival, three fighters for human rights share their experiences: Flora Terah is a women's rights activist in Canada and former parliamentary candidate in Kenya; Harold Hongju Koh is professor of law at Yale and has worked as an advisor to the State Department; Payam Akhavan teaches law at McGill and has been a UN prosecutor at The Hague; all three are deeply involved in human rights issues.

    Posted: Mar 02, 2017 3:59 PM ET
    Last Updated: Mar 02, 2017 2:08 PM ET
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  • Wednesday March 01, 2017

    Shadow of Charm City - Baltimore mural

    The Shadow of Charm City

    In a bid to instill civic pride forty years ago, Baltimore was officially named "Charm City". Today, some call Baltimore a war zone - over 300 homicides per year amid 16,000 vacant homes. And the death of an African American man in police custody in 2015 sparked the worst urban riots since the 1960's. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell takes us inside America's great racial divide.

    Posted: Mar 01, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 24, 2016 1:09 PM ET
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  • Tuesday February 28, 2017

    First Signs - Hand Print

    First Signs: Unlocking the Mysteries of the World's Oldest Symbols

    Paul Kennedy takes a trip back in time to the Ice Age with renowned Canadian archaeologist Genevieve von Petzinger. That's where they discuss the possible meaning behind the strange geometric shapes that appear along with cave art from the Paleolithic Period, and her struggle to crack the code on the first form of graphic communication.

    Posted: Feb 28, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 28, 2017 5:07 PM ET
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  • Monday February 27, 2017

    Ideas from the Trenches - Refuge - Child Refugee

    Ideas from the Trenches - Refuge

    The sense of a moral duty to give refuge to a stranger in need resonates across human cultures and deep into our history. However, as PhD students Kiran Banerjee and Craig Damian Smith argue, the values of the nation state can clash with our profound moral beliefs, creating big problems when we try to apply and honour international human rights. To get beyond this clash, they propose a radical re-thinking of the institutions that shape how nations respond to the voices of refugees.

    Posted: Feb 27, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Nov 26, 2015 4:27 PM ET
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  • Friday February 24, 2017

    Jean Vanier

    The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 2

    "Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world." Jean Vanier, who founded the L'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Now in his 80's, Vanier has spent a lifetime watching and learning and writing.

    Posted: Feb 24, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 19, 2016 3:55 PM ET
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  • Thursday February 23, 2017

    Downloading Decision

    Downloading Decision: Could machines make better decisions for us?

    Humans like to let others make decisions for them. But what happens when those decisions are made by machines or artificial intelligence? Can we trust them to make the right choices? Contributor Scott Lilwall explores how we might program robots to make ethical choices. Assuming, of course, we can ever figure out just how humans make those same choices.

    Posted: Feb 23, 2017 10:48 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 23, 2017 1:26 PM ET
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  • Wednesday February 22, 2017

    Proper Role of Science

    The Proper Role of Science: Sir Peter Gluckman

    The Harper government muzzled scientists. Donald Trump's administration is now doing the same. But a better relationship between science and government is possible. Sir Peter Gluckman is the Chief Science Advisor to the Prime Minister of New Zealand. This episode draws on a conversation he had with host Paul Kennedy and a talk he gave organized by Canadian Science Policy Centre, and hosted by the Institute for Science Society and Policy at the University of Ottawa. His point: science's proper role is to help decision-makers make informed decisions.

    Posted: Feb 22, 2017 12:02 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 22, 2017 4:47 PM ET
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  • Tuesday February 21, 2017

    Phyllis Lambert

    Wachtel On The Arts - Phyllis Lambert

    Eleanor Wachtel speaks to Canadian architectural activist, Phyllis Lambert, in celebration of her exceptional career on her 90th birthday. In the 1950s, she became highly involved in the construction of the landmark Seagram Building designed by Mies van der Rohe. Lambert later founded the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the world's leading museum dedicated to understanding architecture as an art form.

    Posted: Feb 21, 2017 12:08 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 21, 2017 12:40 PM ET
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  • Monday February 20, 2017

    From Tolerance to Tyranny

    From Tolerance to Tyranny

    Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state. Writer Erna Paris first explored this history for IDEAS in 1995. In a new take, she calls what happened in Spain "a cautionary tale for today."

    Posted: Feb 20, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 20, 2017 8:41 AM ET
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  • Friday February 17, 2017

    Jean Vanier

    The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 1

    "Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world." Jean Vanier, who founded the l'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Now in his 80's, Vanier has spent a lifetime watching and learning and writing. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Coulter. Part 2 airs Friday, February 24.

    Posted: Feb 17, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 21, 2017 4:29 PM ET
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  • Thursday February 16, 2017

    Analog Resistance - Magnitizdat Group

    Analog Resistance

    In the Soviet Union during the 1960s, young iconoclasts waged a musical battle against the banality of state-sanctioned culture. Subversive poet/musicians known as "Bards" were recorded at secret house concerts, and reel-to-reel audio tapes shared through a clandestine network. Simon Nakonechny unspools the little-known phenomenon of Magnitizdat, and ponders its parallels to forms of cultural dissidence in Russia today.

    Posted: Feb 16, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 17, 2017 8:05 AM ET
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  • Wednesday February 15, 2017

    Marriage of True Minds # 2 - (The Kiss/Klimt painting)

    The Marriage of True Minds, Part 2

    Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? From the admittedly painful history of Abelard and Heloise, to the complex modern relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, a picture emerges of married men and women who inspire one another in both life and love.

    Posted: Feb 15, 2017 3:48 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 15, 2017 12:36 PM ET
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  • Tuesday February 14, 2017

    The Marriage of True Minds #1 - Venus and Adonis

    The Marriage of True Minds, Part 1

    More than thirty years ago, Paul Kennedy prepared a series that celebrated famous intellectual marriages. These relationships were consummated at various times, from the early Middle Ages to the late-twentieth century. We revisit that classic series from a more contemporary perspective, and wonder what might be learned, and what could be lost from looking for lessons from relationships in the past.

    Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:25 PM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 14, 2017 3:21 PM ET
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  • Monday February 13, 2017

    Yuval Harari

    When Man Becomes God

    In his new book "Homo Deus", Yuval Harari argues that humankind is on the verge of transforming itself: advances creating networked intelligences will surpass our own in speed, capability and impact. But where will this leave us? Will we be enslaved by algorithms we can scarcely understand? Or will we incorporate these advances and become like gods? He joins host Paul Kennedy in conversation.

    Posted: Feb 13, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 11, 2016 3:28 PM ET
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  • Friday February 10, 2017

    Caribou Convention

    What's On Our Quarter? The past and future of Canadian caribou

    No, it's not a moose, which is what most people think it is. The animal is actually a caribou -- one of the most important but misunderstood species in Canada. Paul Kennedy reports from the International Caribou Conference in Thunder Bay about the past and the future of Canadian caribou.

    Posted: Feb 10, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Oct 25, 2016 12:09 PM ET
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  • Wednesday February 08, 2017

    Challenge of Peace

    The Challenge of Peace

    We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters - nations and states understanding each other. What values might we agree on? What ideas about society do we have in common? Has there been progress of any sort? Jennifer Welsh, Paul Heinbecker, Peter Boehm, Arne Kislenko and Daniel Eayrs in conversation from the Stratford Festival.

    Posted: Feb 08, 2017 10:59 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 08, 2017 12:35 PM ET
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  • Monday February 06, 2017

    Pros and Cons

    The Enright Files on humanizing Canada's penal system

    This month's edition of The Enright Files takes a hard look at Canada’s penal system and explores ideas about how prisons can keep society safe in the long run. Michael Enright speaks with some remarkable people who serve prisoners, and society, in special ways.

    Posted: Feb 06, 2017 10:31 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 06, 2017 3:18 PM ET
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  • Friday February 03, 2017

    Margaret Atwood

    "What did we think we were doing?"

    "What did we think we were doing, we young writers of Canada?" That's a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton. In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition. Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today...or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

    Posted: Feb 03, 2017 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 16, 2016 12:29 PM ET
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  • Monday January 30, 2017

    Dr. Janet Rossant - Friesen Prize

    The importance of being ethical with Dr. Janet Rossant

    Winner of the 2016 Friesen International Prize for Health Science Research, Dr. Janet Rossant argues that recent revolutions in genetic medicine demand comparable advances in our understanding of the underlying morality and ethics. She presents her arguments in a public lecture in Ottawa and an interview by Paul Kennedy.

    Posted: Jan 30, 2017 12:58 PM ET
    Last Updated: Jan 30, 2017 1:45 PM ET
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