Knowledge and Democracy

What kind of knowledge is required to sustain a healthy democracy? How can we guarantee a solid foundation for sound policies and social practices? A Royal Society of Canada symposium considers such questions, with a keynote address from Harry Collins.
Scientists rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on September 16, 2013 (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)
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Is there a direct connection between knowledge and democracy? What kind of knowledge is required to sustain a healthy democratic society? How can we guarantee a solid foundation for sound policies and social practices? Does democracy help or hinder scientific progress? Can science contribute to the evolution and maintenance of a healthy civil society? A recent Royal Society of Canada symposium, at Memorial University of Newfoundland, considered such questions, with a keynote address from Harry Collins.


Harry Collins, is a British sociologist of science at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Wales. In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy. His best known book is The Golem: What You Should Know About Science.

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