Monday, September 4
IDEAS LABOUR DAY LEVEE
At the start of a brand new broadcast season, Paul Kennedy convenes an IDEAS Levee, to talk with producers and contributors about shows that are planned for the days and weeks and months to come.


Tuesday, September 5
THE ENRIGHT FILES
Our monthly Monday night feature with Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, in conversation with some of the most original and influential thinkers of our time.


Wednesday, September 6
HOMEWORK BAN: What would it mean if it was banned all together?
Kids and parents alike love to hate homework, but begrudgingly do it anyway. Beyond greasing the wheels for academic achievement, it's argued that the act of homework prepares students for important life skills that they need to survive in the high-stress adult world. But homework is a cultural product. Producer Nicola Luksic marks the history of homework and what it would mean if it was banned all together.


Thursday, September 7
ARE WE F***ED?: Climate Change Denial, Part 1
The Heat. Possums fall dead from trees in Australia. Raging fires force 38,000 residents in B.C. from their homes. In Arizona planes couldn't fly.  Public intellectual Clive Hamilton says we've entered a new geological age. The Anthropocene is here — brought on by human-induced climate change. Part 2 airs Thursday, September 14.


Friday, September 8
ILLIBERAL UNIVERSITIES
Universities are supposed to be dedicated to the exchange of ideas. But according to social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, campuses now skew so far to the left that they've become what he calls "political monocultures" in which voices that stray too far from liberal orthodoxy are shouted down. Paul Kennedy speaks with Professor Haidt – and with other scholars who have been thinking about the complex question of diversity on campus.
 



Monday, September 11
NINE MINUTES THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
In 1876, the poet Stéphane Mallarmé published a poem entitled The Afternoon of a Faun. He doubted anyone could set it to music successfully. But composer Claude Debussy did exactly that. The music runs only about nine minutes long, but it helped give birth to the modern era as we know it. 


Tuesday, September 12
AUTONOMY: The unexpected implications of self-driving vehicles
We're racing down the highway to autonomous cars, whether it takes 10, 20 or 30 years.  But what happens to our economy, the shape of our cities, and even our century-old car-centric culture once the vehicles arrive? Contributing producer Sean Prpick steers through the excitement, opportunities, roadblocks, and unmarked curves as we are driven into the future by a technology that may understand us better than we understand it.


Wednesday, September 13
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, ROBOTS AND THE FUTURE OF WORK, Part 1
AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up to -- do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. She starts in the nineteenth century, when the Industrial Revolution saw the triumph of machine power over muscle power. Now artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines outmoding human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops -- repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs -- are our destiny. Others believe that we may see the return of workers' rights, and maybe even more fulfilling lives. Part 2 airs Wednesday, September 20; Part 3 airs Wednesday, September 27.


Thursday, September 14
DECODING THE RESISTANCE TO CLIMATE CHANGE: Are we doomed? Part 2
Global warming is "Fake News", a "Chinese Hoax". So says a richly funded Conservative movement that's become a world-wide campaign. In her book, The Merchants of Doubt, Harvard historian of science, Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it. 


Friday, September 15
GLOBALIZED ANGER: The Enlightenment's unwanted child
Trumpism. Hindu nationalism. ISIS. Chinese expansionism. People everywhere seem fed up with the status quo, and their anger and intolerance are finding political expression. But why? Pankaj Mishra believes that the current unrest isn't about any so-called "clash of civilizations" between the enlightened and unenlightened. He thinks the globalized anger is the legitimate offspring of the Enlightenment itself. 

 




Monday, September 18
EDUCATION FOR TRANSFORMATION
How do we go about building a better world that's more prosperous, more equitable, and happier? Maybe, it turns out, by improving the lives of girls and women, giving one half of the human race a fairer shake. That all seems to start with access to education. From the Stratford Festival, writer Marina Nemat, actor Maev Beaty, historian Natalie Zemon-Davis and social activist Samantha Nutt talk about the possibilities for global change when we level out the playing field of gender.


Tuesday, September 19
DECOLONIZATION: The Next 150 on Indigenous Lands 
For many, the Canada 150 celebrations are akin to a celebration of colonialism. Three emerging Indigenous PhD scholars share their insights into Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations. Real Carriere focuses on Indigenous governance and the idea of "Nehinuw governance in Nehinuw terms". Keri Cheechoo studies the missing histories of the state-sponsored policy of forced or coercing sterilization of Indigenous women. Cherry Smiley examines the colonization of Indigenous women's bodies and how it relates to prostitution. The program is part of our series Ideas from the Trenches, and is based on a public event hosted by Ryerson University and the Congress for Humanities and Social Sciences.


Wednesday, September 20
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, ROBOTS AND THE FUTURE OF WORK, Part 2
AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up to — do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. She starts in the nineteenth century, when the Industrial Revolution saw the triumph of machine power over muscle power. Now artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines outmoding human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops —repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs — are our destiny. Others believe that we may see the return of workers' rights, and maybe even more fulfilling lives. Part 3 airs Wednesday, September 27.


Thursday, September 21
THE SELF-TAUGHT PHILOSOPHER: How a 900-year-old Arabic tale inspired the Enlightenment
Our contemporary values and ideals are generally seen as the product of the Enlightenment. Individual rights, independent thinking, empiricism and rationalism are traced to the debates and discussions held by the great European thinkers of the 17th and 18th century: Locke, Rousseau, Voltaire, and Kant among others. But these thinkers owe a debt to a figure from 12th century Spain: a philosopher-physician named Ibn Tufayl who wrote a story called Hayy ibn Yaqzan -- which may be the most important story you've never heard
 

Friday, September 22
EXPLETIVE REPEATED: Why swearing matters
Profanity was once considered rude and crude —a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.
 



Monday, September 25
SAVING SYRIA: Keeping war-torn culture alive
Destruction and displacement — that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and the smells of jasmine and tarragon. Maamoun Abdulkarim risks his life rescuing stolen ancient artefacts. Ghada Alatrash translates the work of poets still coping with life in Syria. And journalist Alia Malek writes about the history of Syria through the story of her family. Each talks about the responsibility they feel toward saving the Syria they know, and their fears that those stories might soon disappear.


Tuesday, September 26
DON'T SHOOT THE MESSENGER: The value of whistle-blowing
Recorded at Ryerson University's Centre for Free Expression, Paul Kennedy hosts a panel on why whistleblowers are vital to the public interest...and how their exposure of wrongdoing can ultimately be helpful, even to their workplace. Investigator Sandy Boucher, international expert Anna Myers, and Canadian advocate David Hutton join forces to explain why they believe whistleblowers should be heard and protected. 


Wednesday, September 27
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, ROBOTS AND THE FUTURE OF WORK, Part 3
AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up to -- do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. She starts in the nineteenth century, when the Industrial Revolution saw the triumph of machine power over muscle power. Now artificial intelligence is on the verge of replacing our own intelligence. It took decades to adjust to machines outmoding human and animal labour. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Some say digital sweatshops -- repetitive, dull, poorly paid and insecure jobs -- are our destiny. Others believe that we may see the return of workers' rights, and maybe even more fulfilling lives. 


Thursday, September 28
THE LIVES OF WOMEN, READERS, AND ALICE MUNRO
IDEAS eavesdrops on a group of women in St. John's, Newfoundland. They've gathered on a cold, autumn night for their regular book club. Over snacks, wine and tea, they discuss Alice Munro's work, and how her stories illuminate some of the deepest issues in their own lives. Munro's uncanny ability to shine light on darkened recesses of our inner lives earned her the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013.


Friday, September 29
UNDOING FOREVER
Extinction is supposed to be forever. But in labs around the world, scientists -- using the latest biotechnology -- are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. From passenger pigeons to woolly mammoths, contributor Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.