Tuesday, August 1
THE 2016 CBC MASSEY LECTURES: The Return to History – Lecture 2
In his 1989 essay The End of History? American thinker Francis Fukuyama suggested that Western liberal democracy was the endpoint of our political evolution, the best and final system to emerge after thousands of years of trial and error. Fukuyama seems to have been wrong: our recent history — filled with terrorism and war, rising inequity and the mass flight of populations -- suggests that we've failed to create any sort of global formula for lasting peace and social equity. In the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, Jennifer Welsh explores how pronouncements about the "end of history" may have been premature.

Wednesday, August 2
WIT'S END, Part 1: Understanding mental illness
What's it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit's end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there's stigma and stereotyping. This two-part series looks at mental illness, past and present, theory and practice, from asylums to labs in neuroscience. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell. Part 2 airs Wednesday, August 9.

Thursday, August 3
THE WIRE, Part 5: The sound around
Electricity's done a lot of great things for music, but there have also been a few side-effects. For better or for worse, wherever you go today, music is playing — at a restaurant, in a store, at the mall, when you're on hold on the phone.  Are we suffering from musical overload? How did music came to be so ubiquitous?  And what's the difference between ambient music and aural wallpaper, relaxation and irritation?

Friday, August, 4
NO MAN'S LAND, Part 3
On the outskirts of Calais there's a ramshackle city of tents and plywood huts, home for thousands of refugees and migrants - Lebanese, Syrian, Afghan, Pakistani — from all over, the world. Just across the beach is the English Channel, and they all wait to cross it, to get to Britain and start a new life. They don't want to be in France, and the French for the most part don't want them. So they're stuck: they can't go forward, and they can't go back. Philip Coulter visits a city of dreams and lost hopes to ask the question: what do we owe our neighbour? Part 2 airs Friday, August 4.
 



Monday, August 7
IS THAT ALL THERE IS? Exploring the meaning & future of science
Science helps us understand ourselves and our own place in the cosmos. But how far does the math take us?  And what do science and the humanities tell us when we look at the same questions from different points of view? From the Stratford Festival, a discussion between physicist Neil Turok, science writer Margaret Wertheim and philosopher Mark Kingwell. (And don't worry: they all agree - the world really does exist and so do you.)

Tuesday, August 8
THE 2016 CBC MASSEY LECTURES: The Return to History – Lecture 3
In his 1989 essay The End of History? American thinker Francis Fukuyama suggested that Western liberal democracy was the endpoint of our political evolution, the best and final system to emerge after thousands of years of trial and error. Fukuyama seems to have been wrong: our recent history — filled with terrorism and war, rising inequity and the mass flight of populations — suggests that we've failed to create any sort of global formula for lasting peace and social equity. In the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, Jennifer Welsh explores how pronouncements about the "end of history" may have been premature.

Wednesday, August 9
WIT'S END, Part 2: Understanding mental illness
What's it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit's end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there's stigma and stereotyping. This two-part series looks at mental illness, past and present, theory and practice, from asylums to labs in neuroscience. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell. 

Thursday, August 10
THE WIRE, Part 6: Welcome to the machine
We depend on machines that use electricity - from our cars to our cellphones to our computers to the overhead light. It's no surprise that more machines are making our music. Music that's made entirely of machines can be intimidating because of the dizzying array of sub-categories. But among these is the paradoxically human-machine, techno-organic, cool-sexy, booty-shaking beat-world of electronic dance music.

Friday, August 11
THE MARRIAGE OF TRUE MINDS, Part 1
More than thirty years ago, Paul Kennedy prepared a series that celebrated famous intellectual marriages. These relationships were consummated at various times, from the early Middle Ages to the late-twentieth century. We revisit that classic series from a more contemporary perspective, and wonder what might be learned, and what could be lost from looking for lessons from relationships in the past. Part 2 airs Friday, August 17.
 



Monday, August 14
THE CHALLENGE OF PEACE
We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters - nations and states understanding each other. What values might we agree on? What ideas about society do we have in common? Has there been progress of any sort? Jennifer Welsh, Paul Heinbecker, Peter Boehm, Arne Kislenko and Daniel Eayrs in conversation from the Stratford Festival.

Tuesday, August 15
THE 2016 CBC MASSEY LECTURES: The Return to History – Lecture 4
In his 1989 essay The End of History? American thinker Francis Fukuyama suggested that Western liberal democracy was the endpoint of our political evolution, the best and final system to emerge after thousands of years of trial and error. Fukuyama seems to have been wrong: our recent history — filled with terrorism and war, rising inequity and the mass flight of populations — suggests that we've failed to create any sort of global formula for lasting peace and social equity. In the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, Jennifer Welsh explores how pronouncements about the "end of history" may have been premature.

Wednesday, August 16
THE ORWELL TAPES, Part 1
He was a brilliant, eccentric, complicated man; a colonial policeman, a critic and journalist, a dishwasher, a fighter in the Spanish civil war, a teacher and a shopkeeper — and one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments. Part 2 airs Wednesday, August 23.

Thursday, August 17
THE WIRE, Part 7: The wheels of steel
A century of tinkering with speeds, mechanisms and materials changed the gramophone incrementally into the turntable.  But over the last 50 years - from the early experiments of composer John Cage to the scratching innovations of today's superstar DJs — the turntable has become the nexus for whole new ways of thinking about music. The turntable is explained by the turntablists: musicians who play a turntable like a pianist plays a piano. Featuring the voices of Kid Koala & John Cage.

Friday, August 18
THE MARRIAGE OF TRUE MINDS, Part 2
More than thirty years ago, Paul Kennedy prepared a series that celebrated famous intellectual marriages. These relationships were consummated at various times, from the early Middle Ages to the late-twentieth century. We revisit that classic series from a more contemporary perspective, and wonder what might be learned, and what could be lost from looking for lessons from relationships in the past.
 



Monday, August 21
REAR VIEW MIRROR: Has the future ever looked like the past?
It's tempting to think that in order to comprehend the future, we need to know the past, that there are always lessons in history. But is that true anymore? And has the future ever looked like the past? Sailing in the 21st century, perhaps we are in uncharted waters.

Tuesday, August 22
THE 2016 CBC MASSEY LECTURES: The Return to History – Lecture 5
In his 1989 essay The End of History? American thinker Francis Fukuyama suggested that Western liberal democracy was the endpoint of our political evolution, the best and final system to emerge after thousands of years of trial and error. Fukuyama seems to have been wrong: our recent history — filled with terrorism and war, rising inequity and the mass flight of populations — suggests that we've failed to create any sort of global formula for lasting peace and social equity. In the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, Jennifer Welsh explores how pronouncements about the "end of history" may have been premature.

Wednesday, August 23
THE ORWELL TAPES, Part 2
He was a brilliant, eccentric, complicated man; a colonial policeman, a critic and journalist, a dishwasher, a fighter in the Spanish civil war, a teacher and a shopkeeper — and one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments. Part 3 airs Wednesday, August 30.

Thursday, August 24
THE WIRE, Part 8: The digital democracy of sound
Digital technology has changed how we find, how we make and how we listen to music. Sometimes it's easier to get a hold of your favourite track than it is to get a good cup of coffee. Sounds are sampled, mixed, and shared on a scale that eclipses our wildest dreams from even a decade ago. This has created wonderful and terrible consequences, opening the door to pirates but also to a new world of music - the fourth world, where anything is possible. Featuring the voice of Steve Reich.

Friday, August 25
GENERATION MARS, Part 1
The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We'll be driven by a desire to find life — or what remains of it — and to colonize the planet. Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of  getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving — and living — on the Red Planet. Part 2 airs Friday, September 1.
 



Monday, August 28
THE CHALLENGE OF WORDS: What is the future of literary writing in the digital age?
In our hyperfast, overcaffeinated, 140-character, social-media-blasted, Facebook-overloaded age, there are still people writing serious books. The novel -- an art form that's centuries old -- still has the capacity to hold our attention from subway commute to library chair. But we tell ourselves we're in a different era now. What's to become of serious writing in the digital age? From the 2016 Stratford Festival, a discussion featuring writers Shani Mootoo, Charles Foran and Monia Mazigh.

Tuesday, August 29
THE RETURN OF HISTORY: Your Questions 
The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions -- and thoughtful answers -- in each city on the tour. In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by you, our radio and online audiences, and put to Massey Lecturer Jennifer Welsh by Paul Kennedy.

Wednesday, August 30
THE ORWELL TAPES, Part 3
He was a brilliant, eccentric, complicated man; a colonial policeman, a critic and journalist, a dishwasher, a fighter in the Spanish civil war, a teacher and a shopkeeper — and one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments.

Thursday, August 31
THE ECOLOGY OF SOUND: How opening our ears can open our minds
Soundscape composer Hildegard Westerkamp hears the world differently than most people. Where many of us might hear noise, she uncovers extraordinary beauty and meaning. It's all in how we listen to our environment. Paul Kennedy joins Hildegard Westerkamp on a sound-walk through Vancouver's downtown eastside, and explores how opening our ears to our surroundings can open our minds.