Thursday February 05, 2015

Death Becomes Us, Part 3

"Still Life with Skull", a flower, a skull and an hourglass stand for Life, Death and Time in this 17th-century painting by Philippe de Champaigne.

"Still Life with Skull", a flower, a skull and an hourglass stand for Life, Death and Time in this 17th-century painting by Philippe de Champaigne. (Source: Wikipedia)

Listen to Full Episode 53:59

Burying the dead can be hazardous to our health. Every year, across North America, enough embalming fluid is used to fill a swimming pool, and enough metal to build another Golden Gate Bridge. Cremation can be toxic too, creating vapours from mercury fillings and hip implants. Against this backdrop, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell concludes her three-part series with a look at the burgeoning green burial movement and its message of de-corporatizing death.  

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Participants in the program:

Stephen Cave, philosopher, author of Immortality, The Quest to Live Forever and How It Drives Civilization, Berlin. 

Josh Slocum, executive director of Funeral Consumers Alliance, South Burlington, Vermont, co-author  of Final Rights

Rochelle Martin, home funeral guide, Hamilton, Ontario.

Gary and Joy Warner, exploring the home funeral, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Jusuf and Jody Warner, waiting to discuss their parents' death plans, Toronto, Ontario.  

Hannah Rumble, Department of Anthropology, University of Exeter, England, co-author of Natural Burial: Traditional-Secular Spiritualities and Funeral Innovation.    

Mark Harris, green burial proponent, author of Grave Matters, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.



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