Show Highlights

  • Jennifer Welsh

    IDEAS Jennifer Welsh delivers the 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, "The Return of History"

    In his 1989 essay The End of History? American thinker Francis Fukuyama suggested that Western liberal democracy was the endpoint of our political evolution, the best and final system to emerge after thousands of years of trial and error. Fukuyama seems to have been wrong: our recent history -- filled with terrorism and war, rising inequity and the mass flight of populations -- suggests that we've failed to create any sort of global formula for lasting peace and social equity.

    Posted: Aug 01, 2016 10:23 AM ET
    Last Updated: Aug 01, 2016 10:23 AM ET
  • Monday September 12, 2016

    Jean Vanier

    The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 1

    "Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world." Jean Vanier, who founded the l'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Now in his 80's, Vanier has spent a lifetime watching and learning and writing. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Coulter. Part 2 airs Monday, September 19.

    Posted: Sep 12, 2016 4:59 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 12, 2016 4:03 PM ET
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  • Tuesday September 13, 2016

    Analog Resistance - Magnitizdat Group

    Analog Resistance

    In the Soviet Union during the 1960s, young iconoclasts waged a musical battle against the banality of state-sanctioned culture. Subversive poet/musicians known as "Bards" were recorded at secret house concerts, and reel-to-reel audio tapes shared through a clandestine network. Simon Nakonechny unspools the little-known phenomenon of Magnitizdat, and ponders its parallels to forms of cultural dissidence in Russia today.

    Posted: Sep 13, 2016 1:06 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 13, 2016 1:37 PM ET
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Past Episodes

  • Friday September 23, 2016

    The Philosopher's Walk - Jean Talon Market

    The Philosopher's Walk with Frédéric Bouchard

    Frédéric Bouchard is philosopher of science and biology at the University of Montreal, and the perfect companion for a walk through the Jean Talon Market. His research focuses on the theoretical foundations of evolutionary biology and ecology as well as on the relationship between science and society. The result is a fascinating discussion about mushrooms, unpasteurized goat cheese and honey bees, and how they can make you think about humankind's place in the universe in a whole different way.

    Posted: Sep 23, 2016 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 23, 2016 1:33 PM ET
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    Listen 53:57
  • Thursday September 22, 2016

    Planet Earth

    Solutions For A Warming World

    Experts on climate change gather for the fourth Muskoka Summit on the Environment and discuss options to offset rising global temperatures caused by the continued use of carbon-based fuels. Can the optimism (and the activism) that was sparked in Paris convince governments around the world to do what's necessary to save the planet?

    Posted: Sep 22, 2016 2:46 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 22, 2016 12:30 PM ET
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  • Wednesday September 21, 2016

    The Illusion of Money, Part 2 - Bitcoin

    The Illusion of Money, Part 2

    We think we know what money is. We use it every day and our lives are unimaginable without it. But look more closely and you find that coins and dollar bills aren't "real". They're promises, symbols, ideas. And exactly what money is has evolved enormously over the ages. IDEAS contributor Anik See explores how we're rethinking one of the most basic features of human society.

    Posted: Sep 21, 2016 12:00 AM ET
    Last Updated: Feb 25, 2016 11:28 AM ET
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  • Tuesday September 20, 2016

    Thomas Vinterberg

    Wachtel On The Arts - Thomas Vinterberg

    With films such as "The Celebration " and "The Hunt", Danish director Thomas Vinterberg is interested in exploring themes of family and community- with a particularly Scandinavian twist. Vinterberg talks to Eleanor Wachtel about growing up in a commune in Copenhagen, how it inspired him to become a filmmaker, and about his touching new film, "The Commune."

    Posted: Sep 20, 2016 3:03 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 20, 2016 12:27 PM ET
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  • Monday September 19, 2016

    Jean Vanier

    The Rabbit and the Giraffe: Jean Vanier, Part 2

    "Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world." Jean Vanier, who founded the L'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Now in his 80's, Vanier has spent a lifetime watching and learning and writing.

    Posted: Sep 19, 2016 4:15 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 19, 2016 3:55 PM ET
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    Listen 53:58
  • Friday September 16, 2016

    Margaret Atwood

    "What did we think we were doing?"

    "What did we think we were doing, we young writers of Canada?" That's a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton. In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition. Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today...or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

    Posted: Sep 16, 2016 12:26 PM ET
    Last Updated: Sep 16, 2016 12:29 PM ET
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