Show Highlights

  • Tuesday May 19, 2015

    T.E. Lawrence

    The Shape of Things to Come

    T.E. Lawrence -- Lawrence of Arabia -- was one of the most brilliant and enigmatic figures of the 20th Century. A groundbreaking archaeologist and cartographer, to say nothing of his legendary skills as a military tactician and leader in the First World War, he was also uncannily prescient about the shape of the world to come. As the great powers carved up the world, he foresaw the geopolitical fault lines that plague us still.

    Posted: May 19, 2015 1:20 PM
    Last Updated: May 19, 2015 2:24 PM
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  • Wednesday May 13, 2015

    Norman McLaren

    McLaren in 4D - Artist, Activist, Dreamer and Friend

    At the close of filmmaker Norman McLaren's centenary, Crystal Chan tells us the story of the movie magician about whose films Picasso once said: 'At last! Something new in the world of drawing!' Winner of hundreds of awards, including an Oscar, McLaren founded the National Film Board's animation studio. At the time, his inventions seemed quirky. Now, they seem prescient. McLaren's short films are little riddles for the eye: political, personal, and above all else – playful.

    Posted: May 13, 2015 12:00 AM
    Last Updated: May 13, 2015 12:34 PM
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  • Wednesday May 20, 2015

    Science Under Siege-1

    Science Under Siege

    Are we living through an Anti-Scientific Revolution? Scientists around the world are increasingly restricted in what they can research, publish and say -- constrained by belief and ideology from all sides. Historically, science has always had a thorny relationship with institutions of power. But what happens to societies which turn their backs on curiosity-driven research? And how can science lift the siege? CBC Radio producer Mary Lynk looks for some answers in this three-part series.

    Posted: May 20, 2015 12:00 AM
    Last Updated: May 29, 2015 3:29 PM

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  • Friday May 29, 2015

    Deep Down Dark

    Thirty-three Chilean miners were trapped underground for sixty-nine days, before being rescued, back in 2010. During their hot and hellish underground imprisonment, they agreed to share their story with only one writer. Pulitzer-Prize winner Hector Tobar describes their collective experience, in conversation with Paul Kennedy.

    Posted: May 29, 2015 1:38 PM
    Last Updated: May 29, 2015 11:41 AM
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Ideas Schedule

Past Episodes

  • Thursday May 28, 2015

    Paris Commune 1971

    Fire and Blood: The Paris Commune of 1871

    After years of political turmoil, the citizens of Paris rose up against the government and declared independence. The Paris Commune of 1871 was a model for the revolutions of the 20th century- freedom, liberty, equality, were the cries. But the violence it unleashed, the use of propaganda, the demonizing of the "other", all foreshadow the abuses of state power to come -- in the 20th century until today.

    Posted: May 28, 2015 12:00 AM
    Last Updated: May 28, 2015 1:49 PM
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  • Wednesday May 27, 2015

    Lascaux Cave

    Vestigial Tale, Part 2

    Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective. Why are we humans such suckers for a good story? Literary critics find the answer in story structure, characters, and plotlines. The literary Darwinists find the answer in evolution.

    Posted: May 27, 2015 12:00 AM
    Last Updated: May 27, 2015 11:56 AM
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  • Tuesday May 26, 2015

    Lascaux Cave painting

    Vestigial Tale, Part 1

    Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective. Why are we humans such suckers for a good story? Literary critics find the answer in story structure, characters, and plotlines. The literary Darwinists find the answer in evolution.

    Posted: May 26, 2015 12:00 AM
    Last Updated: May 26, 2015 11:43 AM
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  • Monday May 25, 2015

    Shame

    Shame on You(Tube)

    We are watched. Caught on ubiquitous cell phone cameras. Tweeted in real time. Judged by a capricious social media jury. Andy Warhol predicted that everyone would have 15 minutes of fame. Kelley Jo Burke ponders how we live in a world where everyone might have 15 minutes of shame.

    Posted: May 25, 2015 12:04 PM
    Last Updated: May 25, 2015 12:43 PM
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  • Friday May 22, 2015

    Dante Alighieri

    Dante: Poet of the Impossible, Part 3

    Dante Alighieri was a poet and civic leader in Florence. His enemies had him exiled, hoping he'd disappear from history. But instead he wrote a masterpiece, The Divine Comedy. In an unprecedented move, he made himself the hero of his own epic poem and attained literary immortality. On the 750th anniversary of his birth, we feature this encore presentation of our three-part series.

    Posted: May 22, 2015 9:48 AM
    Last Updated: May 22, 2015 9:51 AM
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  • Thursday May 21, 2015

    Dante's cenotaph

    Dante: Poet of the Impossible, Part 2

    Dante Alighieri was a poet and civic leader in Florence. His enemies had him exiled, hoping he'd disappear from history. But instead he wrote a masterpiece, The Divine Comedy. In an unprecedented move, he made himself the hero of his own epic poem and attained literary immortality. On the 750th anniversary of his birth, we feature this encore presentation of our three-part series.

    Posted: May 21, 2015 12:13 PM
    Last Updated: May 21, 2015 1:22 PM
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    Listen 53:59