Missing & Murdered: Who Killed Alberta Williams?

Listen to the first season of Missing & Murdered here.

Sparked by a chilling tip, Missing & Murdered: Who Killed Alberta Williams? is an eight-part podcast investigation that unearths new information and potential suspects in the cold case of a young Indigenous woman murdered in British Columbia in 1989. 

Listen to the first season of Missing & Murdered below or subscribe to the podcast here

Reporter Connie Walker meets face to face with the person who sent her a tip about Alberta Williams' unsolved murder.  Find out why they're breaking their silence, and meet the sister who's still haunted by vivid memories of Alberta's disappearance.

Reporter Connie Walker meets face to face with the person who sent her a tip about Alberta Williams’ unsolved murder. Find out why they’re breaking their silence, and meet the sister who’s still haunted by vivid memories of Alberta’s disappearance. 35:10

Combing through old police notebooks, Walker tries to piece together what happened on the night Alberta vanished. She discovers that even before Alberta's body was found, one of the people interviewed hinted at a "tragic accident".

Combing through old police notebooks, Walker tries to piece together what happened on the night Alberta vanished. She discovers that even before Alberta’s body was found, one of the people interviewed hinted at a “tragic accident”. 42:17

Investigative reporter Connie Walker tracks down the person police suspected in the murder of Alberta Williams.

Investigative reporter Connie Walker tracks down the person police suspected in the murder of Alberta Williams. 53:31

New details emerge about the last night Alberta was seen alive. Reporter Connie Walker speaks to a key witness who has never been interviewed by police about what he saw the night Alberta disappeared.

New details emerge about the last night Alberta was seen alive. Reporter Connie Walker speaks to a key witness who has never been interviewed by police about what he saw the night Alberta disappeared. 40:38

A shocking new revelation surfaces about people seeing Alberta in a mysterious black truck after she was thought to have disappeared.  The tip propels investigative reporter Connie Walker north, to Prince Rupert, British Columbia.

In this episode, Connie Walker finds the cabbie who people told us they saw with Alberta and her uncle Jack the night after she’s thought to have vanished. While talking to Walker the taxi driver discloses something surprising about his DNA. 44:46

In this episode, Connie Walker finds the cabbie who people told us they saw with Alberta and her uncle Jack the night after she's thought to have vanished. While talking to Walker the taxi driver discloses something surprising about his DNA.

A closer examination of old RCMP notebooks yields new details about a mysterious phone call from a woman who knew where Alberta’s body was concealed, days before her body was actually found. 43:57

A closer examination of old RCMP notebooks yields new details about a mysterious phone call from a woman who knew where Alberta's body was concealed, days before her body was actually found.

Digging deeper into old police notes, Connie Walker tries to find out what happened to a pile of bloody clothes matching a description of what Alberta was wearing on the night she disappeared. 33:42

Digging deeper into old police notes, Connie Walker tries to find out what happened to a pile of bloody clothes matching a description of what Alberta was wearing on the night she disappeared.

Connie Walker questions police about DNA evidence, and learns that after nearly three decades, their seemingly stagnant investigation has become “very active”, as a result of new information brought to light in this podcast. 58:05

Connie Walker questions police about DNA evidence, and learns that after nearly three decades, their seemingly stagnant investigation has become "very active", as a result of new information brought to light in this podcast.

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