Friday September 25, 2015

Vatican astronomer talks science and faith

In this April 15, 2011 file photo, Brother Guy Consolmagno, a Jesuit astronomer at the Vatican's Observatory, right, shows to visitors the Globe of planet Mars. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

In this April 15, 2011 file photo, Brother Guy Consolmagno, a Jesuit astronomer at the Vatican's Observatory, right, shows to visitors the Globe of planet Mars. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia) (The Associated Press)

Listen 6:51

Pope Francis was in Washington, D.C. this week, urging action on climate change. His words made headlines around the world, but the Pope also made a less-reported move recently.

He appointed Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno as the new director of the Vatican Observatory - one of the oldest astronomical research institutions in the world, established by Pope Leo XIII in 1891.

Consolmagno has worked at the observatory since 1993. He's a media-savvy figure who loves to engage on questions about the intersection of faith and science by making appearances on programs like The Colbert Report or in books like "Would you baptize an extra-terrestrial?".

He joined Brent on the line from Castel Gandolfo, Italy.