Is the government right to pull Canada's jets out of the fight against ISIS?

The Trudeau government has made good on its promise to pull Canada's fighter jets out of the battle against ISIS. Instead they are boosting humanitarian aid and putting more boots on the ground. What do you think of the plan? With guest host, Laura Lynch.
Royal Canadian Air Force CF-18 Hornets depart after refuelling with a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 340th Expeditionary Air Refuelling Squadron, October 30, 2014, over Iraq. (Staff Sgt. Perry Aston/U.S. Air Force/Canadian Press)
Listen to the full episode1:53:00

Sunday on Cross Country Checkup: fighting ISIS

The Trudeau government has made good on its promise to pull Canada's fighter jets out of the battle against ISIS. Instead, the Liberals are boosting humanitarian aid and putting more boots on the ground. What do you think of the plan?

Laura Lynch is a reporter for CBC The National. She has spent time in the Middle East, most recently in Syria and Iran.
Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Canada's new policy on the fight against ISIS. From now on there will be no more airstrikes by Canadian fighter jets. Instead, Canada will boost humanitarian aid and put more resources into training for Kurdish soldiers fighting against ISIS, increasing the number of military trainers from 69 to almost 200. The Liberals have promised a total of more than $1.6 billion over the next three years towards this new approach.

The Conservatives say the government is shirking Canada's responsibility. But the NDP say it is a move into deeper and more dangerous involvement.

Canada's military role in the conflict in Syria and Iraq has always been a small one. But this announcement comes in the midst of intensified fighting both on the ground and in the air over Syria and Iraq. And in the past weeks there are allegations that Russia has starting bombing civilian targets in Syria, including hospitals.

There have been many attempts made by international leaders to bring a ceasefire and an end to the five-year civil war in Syria.

The U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced a "provisional agreement" for a ceasefire. Kerry said he spoke with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov to discuss terms and the two now must reach out to the parties in the conflict.

In the past, attempts to reach a ceasefire agreement have failed. What are the chances that this one will work?

Some Canadians say we shouldn't get involved in the conflict in Syria at all due to the extreme complexities in the region. What do you think?

Our question: "Is the government right to pull Canada's jets out of the fight against ISIS?"

GUESTS

Hon.John McKay
Liberal MP for Scarborough-Guildwood and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence 
Twitter: @JohnMcKayLib

Hon. James Bezan
Conservative MP for Selkirk-Interlake and Defence Critic 
Twitter: @jamesbezan 

Dr. Anas al Kassem
Syrian-Canadian Doctor who has travelled to Syria numerous times to help establish hospitals in rebel-held areas 

Joshua Landis
Director, Center for Middle East Studies in the Department of International and Area Studies at the University of Oklahoma
Editor of the blog "Syria Comment" which provides daily updates on the conflict there
Twitter:  @joshua_landis

LINKS & ARTICLES

CBC.ca

RCI

Globe and Mail

National Post

Government of Canada 

Huffington Post

Maclean's

Ottawa Citizen

Toronto Star

Times of Israel

PBS