As It Happens

Reporter talks about her viral video takedown of 'FHRITP' perpetrators

"F--k her right in the p---y." That's the offensive phrase that Toronto TV reporter Shauna Hunt is tired of hearing. Her taped confrontation with some obscene soccer fans who shouted the phrase has gone viral. Many people on social media are calling her a hero.
(CityNews)

"F--k her right in the p---y." That's the offensive phrase that Toronto TV reporter Shauna Hunt is tired of hearing.

Her taped confrontation on Monday with obscene soccer fans who shouted the phrase has gone viral. Many people on social media are calling her a hero.

"It wasn't on live television, this is just what I had to deal with," Hunt tells As It Happens host Carol Off. "It happens almost every day, at least to me, my other colleagues at CityNews, and I know other reporters in the city get it all the time." 

The 'FHRITP' videobombing trend has been going on for a while. CBC reporters say they have experienced the same thing.

"I remember twice I've cancelled live hits," she says. "All it takes is me calling the producer and saying: 'I don't feel good in this situation, they're already yelling that disgusting phrase at me and I just feel like we're going to get one live.' Of course, everyone's really understanding of that. But the fact that this is affecting how we do our job, this is the problem."

One of the men featured in Hunt's report is to be fired by his employer, Hydro One. 

"Hydro One is taking steps to terminate the employee for violating our code of conduct," said Hydro One's director of corporate affairs Daffyd Roderick in a statement. "Respect for all people is engrained in the code and our values. We are committed to a work environment where discrimination or harassment of any type is met with zero tolerance."

Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, which owns the soccer club, says they plan to ban the men who were involved.

Hunt responds: "Our intention was not to vilify these two guys, they just happened to be the guys in the confrontation. They're just an example of hundreds and hundreds of men that have been doing this to reporters in Toronto for the past two years."

"It's unfortunate. It wasn't our intention. We had their identity and we didn't go public with it. We had their names... what we really wanted was a bigger discussion on the bigger issue. And I think we pulled that off."

She hopes that as a result of her video that the 'FHRITP' trend will stop.

"It's degrading. I just want these people to realize that when they're doing this, that they're putting reporters in a very uncomfortable situation. And it is humiliating."

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