The Quirks & Quarks Question Roadshow

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To celebrate spring we offer another episode of our award-winning Quirks & Quarks question show. Today's show was recorded live on the campus of the University of British Columbia.


Part One

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  • Heather Amos in Vancouver asks: "We know dolphins and whales were once land mammals that have gone back to the water, but what about the hippopotamus? Is it an animal on its way back into the water, or on its way out?" With the answer is Dr. Sally Otto, a professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia.
  • Al Graham in Vancouver asks: "What gives the Milky Way its shape?" With the answer is Dr. Harvey Richer, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia.
  • Karanbir Gill from Surrey, BC, asks: "In the future, is it possible that machines will be able to think and learn on their own? And will humans be able to have relationships with such machines?" With the answer is Dr. Elizabeth Croft, a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of British Columbia and a specialist on robot-human interactions.
  • Phyllis Argyle from North Vancouver asks: "Is it true that dogs can smell illness, particularly cancer? And if so, how does this work?" Joining us with the answer is Dr. Stanley Coren, an emeritus professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia and the author of several books on dog behaviour.
  • Brian Mackie from Vancouver asks: "Is there a universal "up" in our universe, or is it entirely relative?" Joining us with the answer is Dr. Ingrid Stairs, an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia.

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Part Two

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  • Terry Davison from Vancouver asks: "How are some spiders able to spin such huge webs over large open spaces?" With the answer is Dr. John Gosline, an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia.
  • Alex Venis in Vancouver asks: "How do babies learn to talk?" With the answer is Dr. Janet Werker, a professor in the Department of Psychology, and the Director of the Infant Studies Centre at the University of British Columbia.
  • Dave Vanderkopp in Vancouver asks: "If galaxies are all moving apart, then how can they collide?" With the answer is Dr. Jaymie Matthews, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of British Columbia.
  • Miriam Sabzevari in Vancouver asks: "Why is it that when your hands are numb with cold, it hurts so much more when they get hit?" With the answer is Dr. Carol-Ann Courneya, an Associate Professor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences at the University of British Columbia.
  • Taya Girard in West Vancouver asks: "Why does it get colder as you go up in the mountains? Since warm air rises, shouldn't it get warmer?" With the answer is Dr. Susan Allen, an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of British Columbia.

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Theme music bed copyright Raphaël Gluckstein.
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