The Ape's Appetite, Election Green Guide: Carbon Quiz, Carbon Pricing



 

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The Ape's Appetite


Pongo-Headshot.jpg From Wikimediea Commons

It's time to break an age-old stereotype: the idea that apes go ape for bananas. Not that they don't like raw foods; it's just that they've got a much more sophisticated palate than we originally supposed. Dr. Richard Wrangham, Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University, has recently done a study looking at whether great apes prefer cooked to raw foods. He and his undergraduate student, Victoria Wobber, gave chimpanzees (as well as orangutans and gorillas) the choice between several kinds of raw and cooked food. Overwhelmingly, the apes chose the cooked items, suggesting they have an inherent preference for cooked foods. Dr. Wrangham believes these finding have important implications for understanding just when our evolutionary ancestors began preparing cooked food.

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The Quirks & Quarks Carbon Quiz


carbon_dioxide.png Carbon dioxide - from Wikimedia Commons

How much do you know about Canada's carbon emissions? Well, to test your knowledge, we've put together a few questions looking at the magnitude of our country's emisssions, the sources, and who's responsible for what. Our quiz-master is Matthew Bramley, Director of Climate Change at the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development in Ottawa.

For the quiz questions and answers, click HERE.

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Carbon Pricing


smokestackcarbon.jpg from Wikimedia Commons

The solution to climate change will be, of course, cutting our greenhouse gas emissions. Much of the key to this is the science and technology around energy efficiency, alternative energy systems like solar and wind, nuclear power and perhaps technologies to capture and sequester emissions from fossil fuels. But the key to having these solutions adopted may lie in another science, the "dismal science" of economics. Economists, politicians and scientists have maintained the economic key to controlling greenhouse gases is emissions pricing. To explore this, we speak with Dr. Bob Page, TransAlta professor of Environmental Management and Sustainability at the University of Calgary's Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy and Dr. Mark Jaccard, Professor at the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. Both were members of the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy which has advised the Canadian government on the policies that could lead to significant reductions in Canada's greenhouse gas emissions.

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Theme music bed copyright Raphaël Gluckstein. Creative Commons License by-nc-nd-2.0