Fight fixing can be justified, says former boxing manager

Charles Farrell managed high-profile boxers like Leon Spinks, seen here serving a right hook to Muhammad Ali in 1978 (Associated Press)

Charles Farrell managed high-profile boxers like Leon Spinks, seen here serving a right hook to Muhammad Ali in 1978 (Associated Press)

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Imagine a boxer, gloves up, celebrating his latest victory before a roaring crowd -- all of them oblivious to the fact that the fight was fixed.

It happens all the time, says Charles Farrell, who estimates that in his decade as a boxing manager, he fixed up to a quarter of his fights. It's been 15 years since Farrell worked for world champions like Leon Spinks and Freddie Norwood, but only recently did the insider decide to share long-held secrets in a lightning-rod piece for Deadspin: Why I fixed fights.

"As long as you've got the loser fixed, the winner just has to go about his work," he says,

'Boxing's never going to change'

Farrell joins Jian to make the case for rigging results and argues that shady dealings can be for a boxer's own good, if only to minimize damage.

"Regardless of the trajectory of their careers, they're going to wind up neurologically impaired," he says, adding that he can't defend boxing itself on a moral level.

"There's a point at which you have to decide if you're in or you're out. And I decided that I was in, but that doesn't mean that I can make an argument for it."

Do Farrell's troubling revelations about boxing surprise you? Share your reactions below.

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