Is it okay to like songs by alleged offenders?

R. Kelly performs during the 2013 Z100 Jingle Ball in New York. In an especially good year for R. Kelly's career, one critic wants the spotlight on his offstage behaviour. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

R. Kelly performs during the 2013 Z100 Jingle Ball in New York. In an especially good year for R. Kelly's career, one critic wants the spotlight on his offstage behaviour. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

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Rock critic Jim DeRogatis wants R. Kelly fans to consider the moral context when listening to the singer's music. Fifteen years after DeRogatis first reported on R. Kelly's alleged sexual involvement with underage girls, he's calling for thorough reviews not of the singer's latest album but rather of incriminating court documents against him.


Following the latest developments published in the Village Voice, Jian speaks to DeRogatis about his extensive investigation into the singer's alleged pattern of sexual predation. DeRogatis also explains why fans need to appreciate the moral context when they celebrate the work of artists who are accused of serious offences (Woody Allen and Roman Polanski, for instance).

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