Q essay: Awaiting justice for Canada's aboriginal peoples

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Sharon Johnston look on as Governor General David Johnston reads the Speech from the Throne yesterday. (CP/Sean Kilpatrick)

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Sharon Johnston look on as Governor General David Johnston reads the Speech from the Throne yesterday. (CP/Sean Kilpatrick)

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While yesterday's throne speech garnered much attention, Jian highlights another statement released this week that deserves our attention, too - namely: 'The statement upon conclusion of the visit to Canada,' issued by James Anaya, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.


"There are also promises of 'continuing dialogue' on treaty rights and land claims, and of continuing to work in partnership with aboriginal peoples to create 'healthy, prosperous, self-sufficient communities,'" he said regarding the content of the throne speech.

"But are these promises enough? Is there any sense that first nations issues are at the forefront for this government? Not really."

"Maybe life should be about more than just getting ready for the next election. And with regard to our relationship with the indigenous people here, there's a lot more we need to do."

Have you read the UN rapporteur's statement? What are your thoughts on the topic? Listen to the essay and let us know.

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