Rewind | Sep 1, 2011 | 6:26

CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Web extra)

In 1979 hundreds of thousands of people fled Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos when the Communists took power. Many escaped on tiny overcrowded ships which attempted to navigate the treacherous open ocean waters. They were called "boat people" and those who survived the dangerous ocean journey ended up in refugee camps desperately searching for a country which would take them in. Between 1979 and 1980, Canada accepted 60,000 as refugees. From 1979, here's a CBC Radio report on efforts to help them adapt to their new home and culture.

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Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 10)Sep 1, 2011 | 6:49Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 10) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 10) Sep 1, 2011 | 6:49After Canada became officially bilingual, many Canadians still felt left out- feeling they didn’t want to be limited as either French or English. Pierre Trudeau’s Liberals came up with a new policy in 1971 called multiculturalism. Identities was one of the CBC Radio programs to tell listeners about what multiculturalism might mean for the country.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 9)Sep 1, 2011 | 8:17Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 9) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 9) Sep 1, 2011 | 8:17Earlier we mentioned the program Identities. It debuted in 1971, and every week it examined how immigrants have shaped Canada, from wine-making to cooking, festivals to language, music to clothing. Here’s a taste of their very first show.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Literature (Clip 2)Oct 13, 2011 | 0:54Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Literature (Clip 2) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Literature (Clip 2) Oct 13, 2011 | 0:54For thirty years, Robert Weaver was a trailblazer on Canada’s literary scene. His radio program, “Anthology,” which first went to air in 1954, was a showcase for some of this country’s best writers. It was an eclectic mix of poetry, fiction and interviews. We’ll hear more about Bob Weaver soon, but first… here’s poet Phyllis Webb, in 1956 as part of a cycle of poems about the seasons.
Rewind - Sound Portrait of 1965Nov 17, 2011 | 54:59Rewind Sound Portrait of 1965 Audio
Rewind Sound Portrait of 1965 Nov 17, 2011 | 54:59Today the year 1965 on CBC Radio - a sort of portrait in sound of a year. You'll hear music, news, drama and talk that give a flavour of what a CBC listener would hear on a given day in 1965.
Rewind - The Rod and Charles ShowDec 15, 2011 | 54:59Rewind The Rod and Charles Show Audio
Rewind The Rod and Charles Show Dec 15, 2011 | 54:59Today, from 1961, the Rod and Charles Show. It was a fast paced, quirky and engaging show hosted by Rod Coneybeare and Charles Winter that became as popular for adults as it did for children.
Rewind - "Front Porch Al" Maitland retrospectiveJul 21, 2011 | 54:59Rewind "Front Porch Al" Maitland retrospective Audio
Rewind "Front Porch Al" Maitland retrospective Jul 21, 2011 | 54:59It’s summer and the days are lazy and long, perfect for sitting on the front porch, sipping some lemonade and listening to a story. And if you don’t have the front porch and the lemonade, well at least we have the story for you. A couple, actually. They’re from former CBC announcer Al Maitland, known affectionately in story telling mode as Front Porch Al. On this show, stories by Stephen Leacock, Saki and O. Henry.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 3)Sep 1, 2011 | 5:26Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 3) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Multiculturalism (Clip 3) Sep 1, 2011 | 5:26The Second World War brought Canada’s immigration policies into sharp focus. We Canadians might like to think of ourselves as a sanctuary for the oppressed, but for European Jews looking for a way out of Nazi tyranny, Canada’s doors were firmly shut. Irving Abella, who wrote the book None is Too Many, called Canada’s record “hideous, shameful and disgraceful.”
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Music (Clip 2)Sep 15, 2011 | 4:00Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Music (Clip 2) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Music (Clip 2) Sep 15, 2011 | 4:00In 1941, CBC National Music Director Jean-Marie Beaudet convinced senior management that CBC should become actively involved in commissioning special works. The first Canadian commission was called Transit through Fire. Listen to this from March 1942.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Politics (Clip 4)Oct 27, 2011 | 1:18Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Politics (Clip 4) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Politics (Clip 4) Oct 27, 2011 | 1:18The first province to enact health care legislation was Saskatchewan. And although Tommy Douglas is widely regarded as the father of Medicare, a man called Matt Anderson initiated the first health care program in the municipality of McKillop, Saskatchewan. Anderson's plan allowed for access to a municipal doctor, 21 days of hospital care, and prescription drugs for an annual fee of five dollars. When Saskatchewan made this local plan province wide on July 1st 1962, doctors reacted swiftly by going on strike.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of War Coverage (Clip 1)Nov 10, 2011 | 1:25Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of War Coverage (Clip 1) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of War Coverage (Clip 1) Nov 10, 2011 | 1:25In 1939 Canada hosted King George and Queen Elizabeth- the first ever visit by a reigning sovereign. CBC Radio, which was just over two years old at the time, had committed 100 staff to cover the visit- two English and two French teams- and purchased a wealth of new equipment including remote amplifiers and custom made microphones. This investment proved invaluable in covering the Second World War when it began just months later. CBC was the voice of Canada at war. CBC reporters told Canadians what their soldiers were doing and helped forge a sense of national identity. Our first clip is from September 3, 1939, when the Prime Minister took to the air to recommend that Canada join Britain and go to war.
Rewind - "The Modern Woman" from Project '62Dec 1, 2011 | 54:59Rewind "The Modern Woman" from Project '62 Audio
Rewind "The Modern Woman" from Project '62 Dec 1, 2011 | 54:59On this edition of Rewind, an hour from the documentary series Project '62. The Project series looked at the pressing social issues of the day- and in this case it was "The Modern Woman." Well, modern circa 1962. In some ways you'll find the program has resonance for our ears- as it grapples with issues of daycare, working women and time constraints. And yet in others- it sounds like the era in which it was made- a Mad Men world. From November 1962, the Modern Woman.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional ProgrammingOct 6, 2011 | 54:59Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming Oct 6, 2011 | 54:59In our seventh installment of shows celebrating the 75th birthday of the CBC we look at regional programming. Sure, we live in this great dominion called Canada, but we also live in our neighbourhoods and towns, cities and provinces. And the stories that affect our lives in those places are at least as important to us as the bigger national stories- sometimes even more so. Sometimes local stories stay right there; on occasion they became stories that have an impact on other Canadians. Michael Enright's co-host is Peter Brown, host of CBC Edmonton's afternoon show, Radio Active.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 1)Oct 6, 2011 | 8:15Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 1) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 1) Oct 6, 2011 | 8:15One of the great stories of Newfoundland is when it joined Canada in 1949. Joey Smallwood was its first permier, but in the late 1930s, he was a broadcaster. As “Joe the Barrelman,” he hosted a daily radio show about Newfoundland history and traditions. Also, the fishery has been at the heart of Newfoundland and Newfoundland radio for decades. 81 year old Stella Bury in 1979 talks about growing up with the Atlantic cod. And in the late 1980s allegations of physical and sexual abuse at a St. John’s orphanage called Mount Cashel began to emerge. By 1989, it became synonymous with the abuse inflicted on its residents. The Winter Commission, which investigated some 300 allegations of abuse, released its findings. And an archbishop resigned.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 2)Oct 6, 2011 | 6:47Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 2) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 2) Oct 6, 2011 | 6:47Before there was a CBC, there was the CRBC- the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission. One of its most remarkable events was in April 1936 when J. Frank Willis did a series of reports about three men trapped underground in a gold mine in Moose River, Nova Scotia. For two minutes every half-hour Willis was live on air throughout North America. He continued for 56 hours straight. About 100 million people listened to North America's first live 24-hour news event. In the late 1940s one of CBC Radio’s most entertaining broadcasters was Max Ferguson. He got his start in Halifax. Listen to this spoof of a commercial that accompanied a popular CBC Radio soap opera. From Pictou and Naked Man Hill to Crapaud and Chocolate Cove, Atlantic Canada is a treasure trove of memorable place names. Listen to this piece from 1996 and Peter Gzowski’s Morningside.
Rewind - CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 3)Oct 6, 2011 | 3:26Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 3) Audio
Rewind CBC celebrates 75 years of Regional Programming (Clip 3) Oct 6, 2011 | 3:26For most of its history most people got to Prince Edward Island via ferry. Nevertheless, pretty well since Confederation, Islanders dreamed of a bridge or tunnel that that would connect them to the rest of Canada. But would a fixed link sacrifice the island's charm? Although tourists loved the romance of the ferry, not all Islanders were as entranced. In 1988 they were asked to vote on the possibility of a link. And the link allowed even MORE tourists to buy objects bearing the likeness of Anne of Green Gables. The red-haired orphan girl has been synonymous with Prince Edward Island...and canny entrepreneurs have always found a way to cash in.

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