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    The Current | Feb 27, 2015

    This week, an Ontario politician revealed he doesn't believe in human evolution. It made a lot of people uncomfortable. Today we're asking if some beliefs are different from others and if voters have a right to know about the people who represent us.

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    Ideas | Feb 26, 2015

    "Yes means yes. No means no." Giving consent seems straightforward. But what we're allowed to consent to is actually deeply fraught territory. And it gets especially fraught when the question of sex enters the equation. When does the law intervene?

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    Day 6 | Feb 20, 2015

    Is 25 the new 18? According to new research, putting off the life changes associated with adulthood may have a real impact on our brains.

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    As It Happens | Feb 25, 2015

    Yesterday, the government of Jamaica decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana, and made it legal for households to grow up to five plants. Opposition MP Delroy Chuck explains why it's a good idea.

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    Spark | Feb 22, 2015

    Writer William Gibson joins us to talk about his latest novel, how our sense of history is changing, and whether we're actually living in a dystopian sci-fi novel.

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    Writers and Company | Feb 22, 2015

    John Updike said of American novelist Anne Tyler that she '... is not merely good, she is wickedly good.' In a rare interview, Eleanor Wachtel speaks with Anne Tyler about her life and work, and about her new novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."

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Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 1Jan 6, 1962 | 29:41Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 1 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 1 Jan 6, 1962 | 29:41In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."
Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 2Jan 5, 1962 | 29:40Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 2 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 2 Jan 5, 1962 | 29:40In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."
Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 3Jan 4, 1962 | 28:52Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 3 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 3 Jan 4, 1962 | 28:52In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."
Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 4Jan 3, 1962 | 29:38Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 4 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 4 Jan 3, 1962 | 29:38In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."
Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 5Jan 2, 1962 | 29:18Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 5 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 5 Jan 2, 1962 | 29:18In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."
Ideas - The Educated Imagination - Part 6Jan 1, 1962 | 29:24Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 6 Audio
Ideas The Educated Imagination - Part 6 Jan 1, 1962 | 29:24In the 1962 Massey Lectures, Northrop Frye writes: "What good is the study of literature? Does it help us to think more clearly or feel more sensitively or live a better life than we would without it? What is the function of the teacher and scholar or the person who calls himself, as I do, a literary critic? What difference does the study of literature make in our social or political or religious attitude? In my early days, I thought very little about such questions, not because I had any of the answers but because I assumed that anybody who asked them was naive. I think now that the simplest questions are not only the hardest to answer but the most important to ask..."

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