A little boy having fun going down a hill on a duct tape sled
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DIY Duct Tape Sleds

Feb 6, 2017

When it comes to winter in the prairies, you can never have enough pairs of mitts. Or enough toques. You also cannot have enough sleds! Because, let's face it, when winter usually hangs around for about six months, you need to get out and enjoy the winter weather and snow. So even though we own a variety of different sleds, we have never made a homemade duct tape sled.

A little boy sledding on a duct tape sled

Since my kids enjoy crafts and sledding, I thought it would be fun to try making our own duct tape sleds.

Here's what you'll need:

  • a large piece of cardboard
  • duct tape — how much you needs depends on the size of the cardboard you are using
  • scissors

Everything you'll need to make a duct tape sled


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First, cut a handle into your piece of cardboard. Next, start covering both sides of the cardboard in duct tape, ensuring that you wrap the edges of the cardboard in tape as well. Make sure each strip of tape overlaps the previous strip to make sure the cardboard is well protected from the snow it will soon be racing down.

We used almost four full rolls of duct tape from the dollar store (not sure if non-dollar store duct tape comes in a larger roll or not) to cover the entire surface of the cardboard.

A child using blue duct tape on their piece of cardboard

Peeling, pulling, flattening and cutting the duct tape is a great way for kids to work on their fine motor skills. However, depending on the age of your child, you may need to help them with the tape so that it doesn't stick to itself!

Another great thing about duct tape is that it now comes in a variety of colors and patterns! My boys each made a sled in the color of their choosing.

A little boy holding up a completed duct tape sled done in blue duct tape


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Now, I have to admit that I wasn't entirely sure how well these homemade cardboard sleds would work on the snow hill. Even my husband was skeptical! But we carried our sleds to the hill for a test run and were pleasantly surprised with the results.

A little boy going down a hill on a duct tape sled

The duct tape sleds held up amazing during our first afternoon of sledding with them, but the highlight for the kids was the fact that these sleds were fast — so fast! As an added bonus, since the sleds are so light, the kids can easily carry them up the hill by themselves without complaints. However, if it's windy out, then make sure the kids have a good grip on the handle because it doesn't take much to blow these homemade sleds away!

A little boy peeking out from the opening where the handle of the duct tape sled is

As a fun alternative, you can use these homemade duct tape sleds as shields during an epic snowball fight! The space beneath the handle makes a perfect spot to peek out on your enemies.

Article Author Dyan Robson
Dyan Robson

Married to her high school sweetheart, Dyan is mom to two boys, J and K, who also teaches piano out of her home. On her blog And Next Comes L, Dyan shares her story of raising a child with hyperlexia, hypernumeracy and autism, amongst a variety of sensory activities for kids. You can find out more about their story on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Instagram and Google+.

 

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