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Dinners

5 Simple Sheet Pan Suppers

Jan 6, 2017

One-dish meals have long been appealing for their easy preparation and minimal dishes. Deep, cheese-smothered casseroles were the way to go in the eighties, but these days heavy, rimmed baking sheets are being called into service for dinner first, cookies later.

While big cuts of meat — whole chickens, pot roasts and the like — can be cooked with veggies alongside, it’s a lengthier process; roasting smaller pieces like fish filets and chicken thighs spread out in a single layer, with room for heat to circulate around them, takes a fraction of the time. Bonus: everything caramelizes on the edges, and if you use a piece of parchment or foil underneath, cleanup is practically nil.

Once you get the gist, virtually anything goes — roasting is one of the very best ways to cook most any type of vegetable. Sturdier veggies like potatoes, cauliflower and squash can be timed with bigger cuts of meat, like chicken thighs — or start them in the oven first, then add pieces of meat that will cook through more quickly. Your only prep is to drizzle everything with olive or canola oil (or any neutral vegetable oil), toss to coat with your hands and sprinkle with salt and pepper. You could even take it a step further and brush your chicken or salmon with your choice of sticky glaze.

Teriyaki chicken skewers and roasted brussels sprouts in bowls

Here are a few combos to try when you need to get a full meal on the table in one go. Adjust quantities according to how many you want to feed, but make sure your pan isn’t too crowded or your meat and veggies will steam instead of browning properly.


Salmon And Asparagus

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Place a salmon filet of any size on a parchment-lined, rimmed baking sheet. Snap the tough ends off a handful of asparagus, wherever they naturally break, and arrange on the sheet around the salmon. Drizzle everything with oil and toss to coat the asparagus with your hands, and rub over the surface of the salmon. (Alternatively, spread the salmon with pesto or your favourite glaze.) Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper and roast for 10-12 minutes, until the edge of the salmon flakes with a fork, the middle of the fish is still moist and the asparagus is tender-crisp.

A baking sheet with salmon, asparagus and lemon


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Teriyaki Chicken Skewers With Brussels Sprouts

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Cut skinless, boneless chicken thighs into chunks and marinate for a few hours or overnight in 1/4 cup soy sauce, 2 tbsp brown sugar, 1 tbsp lime juice or cider vinegar, 2 crushed garlic cloves and 1 tsp grated ginger. (You can multiply this if you have more chicken to marinate.) When you’re ready to cook, soak a handful of bamboo skewers in water while you preheat the oven. Thread the chicken onto the skewers, and toss halved brussels sprouts and scrubbed baby carrots in a bowl with oil to coat plus a pinch of salt and pepper. Place the skewers on a parchment-lined baking sheet and spread the veggies out around them. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and the veggies are tender.

A baking tray with chicken skewers and brussels sprouts


Sausages With Onions And Peppers

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Place fresh sausages (such as Italian, chorizo or chicken-apple) and arrange thick slices of red, yellow or orange peppers and purple onion around them. Drizzle the vegetables with oil, toss gently with your hands to coat and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 20-30 minutes, or until the veggies are tender and the sausages are cooked through. Serve as is, or stuff into hoagie buns and sprinkle with grated cheese.

A baking tray with sausages, peppers and onions


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Chicken Thighs And Sweet Potato Fries

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Place skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs on a large, rimmed baking sheet; drizzle with oil and use your hands to coat the pieces. In a bowl, toss wedges or sticks of sweet potato with oil to coat. Spread out around the chicken pieces and sprinkle everything with salt and pepper. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the chicken is just cooked through and the potatoes are golden.

A baking tray with chicken thighs and sweet potatoes


Spicy Roasted Shrimp And Broccoli

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Toss broccoli florets with oil and sprinkle with a big pinch of cumin, chili flakes and salt and pepper. In a small bowl, toss large raw tail-on shrimp with oil, some lemon zest and salt and pepper. Cut a lemon into wedges. Spread the broccoli and lemon wedges out on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet and roast for 10 minutes. Add the shrimp and cook for 8-10 minutes more — just until the shrimp are opaque. Serve with crusty bread or rice, with a squeeze of roasted lemon.

A baking tray with broccoli, shrimp and lemon

Article Author Julie Van Rosendaal
Julie Van Rosendaal

Julie Van Rosendaal is the author of six best-selling cookbooks (with a seventh due out this fall), the food editor of Parents Canada magazine and the food and nutrition columnist on the Calgary Eyeopener on CBC Radio One. She is a recipe developer, TV personality, food stylist and writes about food for local, national and international publications. She is perhaps best known as the voice behind her popular food blog, Dinner with Julie, where she documents real life at home in Calgary with her husband and nine-year-old son. Connect on twitter @dinnerwithjulie.

 

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