Triptic of cookie butter cookies, jar of cookie butter spread and cookie butter oatmeal cookies
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Snacks & Treats

3 Delicious Treats You Can Bake with Cookie Butter

Jan 15, 2018

Anyone who loves peanut butter will appreciate the textural similarity of cookie butters. Biscoff, Speculoos and Penotti Cookie Notti are all spreadable versions of much-loved cookies, with the look and texture of peanut butter, if not the taste. There are plenty of things to do with it besides spread on toast or eat by the spoonful — here are three recipes that will ensure you don’t miss the peanut butter in your life, or lunches.

A jar of Penotti Cookie Notti.


You'll Also Love: Banana Bread Biscotti


Cranberry and White Chocolate Cookie Butter Blondies

Cookie spreads lend themselves well to dense, chewy blondies. If you like, swap the white chocolate for dark, and skip the cranberries.

Freshly baked cranberry and white chocolate cookie butter blondies.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/3 cup cookie butter
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/3 cup chopped white chocolate

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350˚F.

In a medium bowl, stir together the melted butter, brown sugar, egg and cookie spread. Add the flour, baking powder and salt and stir until almost combined. Next, add the cranberries and white chocolate and stir just until blended. Spread the batter into a parchment-lined 8x8-inch pan and bake for 25 minutes, or until the edges are golden and pulling away from the sides of the pan. Cool slightly in the pan on a wire rack before cutting.

Makes 16 blondies.


Cookie Butter Cookies

These look just like peanut butter cookies — without the peanut butter. Feel free to make any additions, like adding finely chopped white or dark chocolate.

Overhead shot of cookie butter cookies beside a glass of milk.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup cookie butter
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350˚F.

In a large bowl, mix the cookie butter, brown sugar, egg and vanilla until smooth. Stir in the flour, baking soda and salt, mixing until you have a soft dough.

Roll the dough into balls a little larger than a walnut and place on a parchment-lined or greased baking sheet. Flatten each ball with the tines of a fork. Bake for about 12 minutes, until golden around the edges and just set. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Makes one dozen cookies.


Cookie Butter Oatmeal Cookies

Made with a mild vegetable oil, these cookies can be made dairy-free if you find dairy-free cookie butter and use dairy-free chocolate chips (or substitute chopped dark chocolate).

Cookie Butter Oatmeal Cookies

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup canola or other mild vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup cookie butter
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup quick or old-fashioned oats
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 cup chocolate chips

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350˚F.

In a large bowl, mix the brown sugar, oil, cookie butter, egg and vanilla until smooth. Stir in the flour, oats, baking soda and salt, mixing until you have a soft dough. Stir in the chocolate chips.

Drop the dough by the large spoonful (or use a cookie scoop) onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 12-14 minutes, or until golden around the edges but still soft in the middle. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Makes about 1 1/2 dozen cookies.


Disclaimer: Please note that cookie butters may contain nuts, or be made in a facility that processes nuts and in no way should be consumed by people who have nut allergies. As always, be sure to read the label to see if a cookie butter is peanut-free.

 

Article Author Julie Van Rosendaal
Julie Van Rosendaal

Read more from Julie here.

Julie Van Rosendaal is the author of six best-selling cookbooks (with a seventh due out this fall), the food editor of Parents Canada magazine and the food and nutrition columnist on the Calgary Eyeopener on CBC Radio One. She is a recipe developer, TV personality, food stylist and writes about food for local, national and international publications. She is perhaps best known as the voice behind her popular food blog, Dinner with Julie, where she documents real life at home in Calgary with her husband and nine-year-old son. Connect on twitter @dinnerwithjulie.

 

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