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August 2011 Archives

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Explaining cougar attacks, planning for school dispute, RJH demolition and Cabin 12

bob hansen
Bob Hansen (CBC)
Bob Hansen, the senior biologist at Pacific Rim National Park, talks about why cougars are attacking people on the Island and how can we protect our children and others.

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Jim Cambridge, Superintendent of the Sooke School District, talks about plans for the classroom if teachers take job action this fall.

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A look at plans for some of the outdated buildings at Royal Jubilee Hospital, the region's oldest hospital, with Grant Hollett, the director for planning for the Vancouver Island Health Authority.

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Khalil Aktar meets Corey Judd, owner of Cabin 12, the downtown Victoria restaurant that faces an uncertain future with plans for redevelopment of the building it rents.

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Blogging the Fringe: The Donnelly Sideshow

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by Jeff Culbert

"This is The Donnelly Sideshow. It has romance, music and murder, all in one show."

I have been using that line as a pitch to Fringe patrons as they wait in line for other shows. People like the sound of it. They smile. Then I might add, "But it's a true story. It happened in 1880, around my home town of Lucan Ontario." 

But my pitch changes when someone recognizes the Donnelly name. I've already met several people in Victoria who know the story through James Reaney's trilogy of plays, The Donnellys. Others know Donnelly songs: one by Steve Earle, two by Stompin' Tom Connors and a whole album by Earl Heywood. (I'm adding four new songs to the genre myself in The Donnelly Sideshow.) Some people had seen a Donnelly documentary on TV; others had been taken to the Donnelly grave on the Roman Line when they were kids.

But the big one - the one that flips a switch of recognition in so many brains - is "The Black Donnellys".

For some people, that's all they need to hear. "It's about those Donnellys? I'm in." So for a guy pitching a show, it's tempting to use the name. It's just so ... efficient. But it also poses a slight dilemma.
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Bear encounter, VGH power failure, dead carver honoured and BC Ferries. Plus, climate change course

black bear
(Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)
Riley Teufel talks about his frightening encounter with a black bear in Campbell River that sniffed him while he played dead.

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Gregor talks about Monday's power outage at Victoria General Hospital with Norma Jones, the director of emergency management for the Vancouver Island Health Authority. The power failure forced the hospital to cancel more than 30 non-emergency surgeries and run on back-up generators.

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Connie Sue Martin, the founder of the John T. Williams memorial totem pole project, discusses the ceremony planned in Seattle to honour the Vancouver Island carver who was shot and killed by a police officer one year ago.

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Former ferries MInister Gordon Wilson talks about options for helping BC Ferry Services through the rough financial waters it is experiencing. 

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B.C. Environment Minister Terry Lake talks about a new program of online climate change courses for civil servants. 

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Fringe Fest Previews

Little Orange Man

SNAFU Dance Theatre • Victoria, BC
By Ingrid Hansen & Kathleen Greenfield
Physical Theatre • 75 minutes • All Ages

From SNAFU: co-creator of THE GINGER NINJAS & multiple Pick-of-The-Fringe Winner.  Prepare yourself for Kitt, whose world-view has been informed as much by her grandfather's gruesome folktales as by Google and quantum theory.

Listen:
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Tara Firm and the Lunar War Chronicles

Launch Pad Productions• Victoria, BC 
 by David Radford Comedy/Adventure • 70 minutes 
 PG 14 (Coarse Language, Cartoony Violence) 

 Gear up! Goggles on! It's 1918 and you're going to the Moon!  Join buxom bombshell Tara Firm in the high flying battle against Lunar Militarism. It's Indiana Jones meets Futurama. Featuring Charlie (One Man Star Wars) Ross, Rod Peter Jr., David Radford, Chris Cooley, and Christina Patterson as the rivet popping Tara Firm.

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Spitting In The Face Of The Devil

John Montgomery Theatre Company • New York, USA
By Bob Brader
Drama • 80 minutes
Adults Only"  "Coarse Language, Adult Themes

In this daring, uplifting and comedic solo show, acclaimed New York monologist Bob Brader tells the gripping, totally true story of discovering that his charismatic ex-Marine father is a pedophile. 

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Limbo

Andrew Bailey • Victoria BC
By Andrew Bailey
Solo Comedy • 55 minutes
PG 14+ (Coarse Language)


After a near death experience Andrew Bailey ("Scrupulosity", "Atomic Vaudeville") is determined to live every moment to the fullest. He solves the meaning of life in the first minute, then unsolves it for the next fifty-four. "Limbo" won the 2010 Vancouver Fringe Critics' Choice Award. Directed by Britt Small ("Atomic Vaudeville", "Ride the Cyclone")

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Fortunate Son

Rolling Stock Theatre • Victoria, BC
by Peter Boychuk
Drama • 50 minutes
PG 14+ (Coarse Language)


Set after the state funeral for Pierre Elliot Trudeau, FORTUNATE SON is about how Justin Trudeau gave a speech and inherited a nation. "Sweet all-Canadian treat!" - Vancouver Sun;  Best of the Fest - ACToberfest Theatre Festival; Winner of the Stanley Mill Purchase Prize; Honourable Mention at the Canadian National Playwriting Competition.

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The Fabulous Miss Rosie Bitts

Best Bitts Productions • Victoria, BC
By J. Mclaughlin, Rosie Bitts, Wes Borg
Burlesque, Music, Theatre • 60 minutes
Adults Only (Extremely Coarse Language, Adult Themes, Nudity)

The audience awaits Rosie Bitts, burlesque star. They're here for her voice, her costumes, to see if she'll take off her clothes... so are the police. If she does, they'll shut the place down.  Combining burlesque, music and theatre Rosie explores the politics of female nudity, in an examination of the fight against misunderstanding and censorship still felt by today's performers.

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Untangling HST, voting on taxes, defending net pens and textbook rentals

Chris Delaner (right), Bill Vander Zalm (centre) react to HST referendum
Chris Delaney (right), Bill Vander Zalm (centre)
react to vote results(CBC News)
UVic economist Elizabeth Gugl talks about about the options and costs of dismantling the Harmonized Sales Tax.

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VIU political science professor Allan Warnke discusses the prospect of more direct voting on tax policy following the defeat of the HST. 
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Stewart Hawthorn of Greig Seafood in Campbell River responds to the call for closed containment fish farming by ex-Canuck hockey player Willie Mitchell.

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Camosun College bookstore manager Laura-Lea Berna discusses the move to offer online textbook rentals to help cut costs for students.

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On the Ledge:

Axing the tax: the death of the HST

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Gregor Craigie takes a look at the hot issue in B.C. politics every Friday

BC voters have voted to scrap the HST in a mail-in referendum ballot. The HST opponents are claiming victory, while those who supported the tax say losing it will cost the province billions of dollars. We look at the political fallout of the HST referendum and what it might mean for the timing of the next provincial election.

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Ferries CEO answers listeners, acetaminophen warning and political panel on post-HST options

Ferries CEO David Hahn
(CBC News)

We've been hearing this week about possible changes to BC Ferries.  CEO David Hahn says the company is asking for permission to cut 400 sailing a year in response to a decline in riders and revenues. It's a proposal  that has generated a lot of reaction. In an interview with Gregor,  David Hahn answers questions from listeners.

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The cure that can kill: The Canadian Medical Association is backing stronger warnings about the dangers of the popular painkiller acetaminophen - we'll speak Dr. Valorie Cunningham, the Duncan physician whose emergency room observations started the campaign.

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What happens after the tax gets the axe? The Friday political panel looks at how the government will handle the HST referendum result and the return to a provincial sales tax. 

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Blogging the Fringe: My new process

Dave Morris in Photo Booth
Dave Morris in Photo Booth (Intrepid Theatre)

By Dave Morris

This year I'm in the Victoria Fringe with my solo improv show, Photo Booth. It's a simple enough concept, I improvise four characters based on faces/poses made by the audience. There's also some cool flashing light and freezing effects to give the show a photo-booth feel.  I know, perfect in its simplicity. It's less crass then last year's Dave Morris is an Asshole. In that show, I asked for the worst things people have done and wove them together into one story about an asshole (which could have been anyone, really). Both shows are fun in their own way. 

These two shows, though very different in concept,  have one thing in common. Neither started from a place of improv or form, both shows began as concepts, and from their concept a show was formed.  This is a little different then most improvisation you'll see. Most improv is presenting  forms/games/structures, with specific people doing them. A group learns The Harold or a Tap-Out or make up some game called "somegame" and that becomes what their group does. They are defined by the form (or free form) they do, and not the reason, or concept, behind doing it. 

But why do improvisers do this?

It's quite simple really: Improvisation is not a product. It's not a thing to sell to someone. Telling someone to see improv is like telling them to go see "movie" or telling someone they should really check out "book." Improv is a process. It is a way of doing something. So most groups end up treating the form they do as a product, and up until recently, I've always treated myself as the product. "Come see Dave Morris improvise." It's not an improv show, it's a Dave Morris show. Which is why my shows were always called Dave Morris is a BLANK. Well, not anymore. Now the concept is my product. Thus this year's title: Photo Booth.

Having a concept instead of just a form or person as a product opens the show up to a larger audience. Take Photo Booth for instance. It isn't just a show for people who like improv or Dave Morris, it's also for people who love photo booths. For people who love capturing a once- in-a-lifetime moment with friends. People who are sad to see shopping malls adopt the digital photo booth and toss out the old-fashioned film booth. This show is for people who love the you-only-get-one-shot mentality that is the magic of not only photo booths, but improvisation itself. 


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Willie Mitchell on fish farming, money laundering, world wedding tryout and MSP protest

Willie Mitchell
(Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

Former Vancouver Canucks defenceman Willie Mitchell weighs in on the fish farm debate with a submission to the Cohen Commission that is looking at the collapse of the 2009 sockeye run. Mitchell, a Port McNeill native, wants to see closed containment instead of net pens.

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Ed Rampone, a former investigator for B.C.'s Gaming Enforcement and Policy Branch, discusses the government's new plan to prevent money-laundering in casinos. 

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Alex Penning and Lisa Gant discuss their two-year trip to test drive 30 potential wedding locations around the world, including Vancouver Island.

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Cliff Boldt discusses why a group of seniors rights advocates want to get rid of the MSP for older British Columbians.

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Marmot breeding setback, Vancouver Island health report and Nanaimo dog-park conflict

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Malcolm McAdie of the Marmot Recovery Foundation talks about the setbacks for Vancouver Island marmot breeding effort resulting from the hard winter and cool spring weather. 

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Chief Medical Health Officer  Richard Stanwick discusses a new report on the health status of Vancouver Island residents. It shows more Vancouver Islanders are physically active and healthy eaters than the rest of B.C., but we have higher rates of  premature death related to smoking, drinking and other preventable causes. 

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Nanaimo parent Rod Whitney talks about the signs posted by pet owners in Beban Park warning parents to keep their kids away from dogs.

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Parents vs pet owners in Nanaimo dog park, a Libyan student in Victoria and Kabuki Kabs

dogs (Catherine Rolfsen/CBC)



Julie McTier, a dog owner in Nanaimo, discusses new signs calling for parents to keep their children on a tighter leash in dog-friendly parks.

 
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Adel Younis, a UVic post-doctoral student from Libya, talks about his reaction and his friends and relatives in Tripoli as rebel forces advance on General Moammar Gadhafi's compound.

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On the Island's Sterling Eyford speaks with Randy Phipps, the founder of Kabuki Kabs, about the possible end of the oldest pedicab business in Victoria. 

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SNAFU Summer 2011

Little Orange Man - SNAFU Dance Theatre.jpg


Show: Little Orange Man
Author : Ingrid Hansen - SNAFU

Somehow, a years worth of work and play always gets crammed into two-and-a-half months of summer. 

I begin summer working 10-hour days as a puppeteer. I sit in a dark warehouse on the set for a children's TV Series called Tiga Talk.  There are three puppets - a wolf, a goose and a gopher. I'm the gopher. I'm a gopher with a Miss Piggy complex: chubby, fuzzy, but damned if I don't look good in a tiara, tutu and a moustache.  On the set I eat free catered food, hang out with adorable children and laugh with the other puppeteers. These guys bring Nerd up to a whole new level of Amazing. I speak all day in the voice of a gopher, and I rarely see the sun.   This is July. 

After four weeks in puppet-world I hop on a red-eye flight to Toronto.  I rehearse, remix, and rebuild the show Pretty Little Instincts for the SummerWorks Festival. We dance outdoors in the grassy moat on the walls of an old Historic Fort tucked away in downtown Toronto, sharing stage space with the bats and the gophers and the...skunks. They frolic around the dancers in their matching black and white. Performing in the show, I'm a white-painted red-maned woman at a post-apocalyptic mad-hatter's tea party. We dance barefoot in the grass, tip-toeing around mothballs we've left in corners to keep away the skunks. This is Early August.

I fly back to the Island. Kathleen Greenfield and I begin building Little Orange Man for the Victoria Fringe.  I'm now twelve years old.   I play Kitt the Kinder-Whisperer. Kitt's world view is formed as much out of her grandfather's gruesome folktales as of Google and quantum theory. "Kitt's not someone you'd want your kid to have a playdate with," wrote the Calgary Herald, "she's the sort of girl that director Terry Gilliam might have dreamed up."  As Kitt, I am beginning a massive dream experiment -- which requires access to the audience's subconscious.  I'm looking for strangers online to take part in this experiment.  I'm losing the one I love most and I'm fighting. Hard. I sing. I'm playing with my food as the epic battle unfolds between celery and romaine. This is Late August.  

We open this Friday if you want to join the experiment.  

Little Orange Man - Opening Friday August 26th









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Remembering Jack Layton, Victoria's garbage economics and fishing lodge sewage

layton.jpg Two Vancouver Island MPs, Jean Crowder of Cowichan, and Denise Savoie of Victoria, discuss their memories of federal NDP leader Jack Layton, who died this morning. 






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The City of Victoria is looking at new plans for curbside collection, composting, and recycling. Gregor speaks with Lisa Skumatz, an economist specializing in waste management, about how Victoria stacks up against other landfills in North America.

 
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Coastal fishing lodge owners are critical of demands for sewage treatment at their remote compounds. Marcus Goluza of Environment Canada explains the reason for the requirements.

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How to fringe

2011 Fringe FestAre you ready to Fringe?

The Victoria Fringe Festival runs Aug. 25-Sept. 4; Eleven days, four locations, almost 75 shows. 

In an interview with David Lennam, festival producer Jan Munsil provides a primer on how - and why - to make the most of the 25th annual Fringe.
  
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Fest-ivities start Tuesday with a Fringe Prom Dance Party, a Luminara show and a dance called Romp! In Centennial Square.

For all your Fringe needs, including ticket and schedule information, visit VictoriaFringe.com.

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Victoria's garbage pickup, plastic bags redux, Holiday Court and closing group homes

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(Editor B/Flickr)

With guest host David Lennam:

Trash talk: Mayor Dean Fortin discusses the proposal before Victoria's City Council this week that outlined new options for garbage collection, composting, and recycling.

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From plastics to paper and back again.Reporter Sarah Towle hit the streets to hear what grocery shoppers think about some Thrifty's stores going back to providing plastic bags for groceries.

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 The vacant Holiday Court motel on Hillside Ave. used to be a last resort  for Victoria's addicts and street people. Now a local business owner has a new plan for the site. A look at the Holiday court's past and future. 

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Politicians and advocates for people with disabilities say a shortage of provinicial cash is forcing group homes to close and disrupting the lives of the people who live in them. Freelance reporter Janet May looks at the impact in Powell River.

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Blogging the Fringe: Audiences large and small

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For the 2011 Victoria Fringe Fest, On the Island is featuring blog posts by several Fringe performers.

By Cameryn Moore

I've been touring Phone Whore around North America for close to a year and a half--the tally is well over 100 shows by now--and the most common question audience members ask me, after "do you ever get any calls from girls?" (not yet) and "do you ever get turned on while working" (once or twice) is "when did you stop doing phone sex?" 

Note the past tense, as if I must have thrown it over a long time ago for the glamorous and high-paying field of solo Fringe performance. Or maybe it's that people imagine Phone Whore to be a confessional, a sort of semi-repentant "look at the crazy stuff I said for money, can you believe it?!" Everybody knows that confessional tales are most effective when the things one is confessing are over and done with.

Read more »

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Entangled humpback update, the case for nurse anesthetists and new Lyme clinic opens

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Bullet buoy trailing behind Canuck and view of whale's flank with lice infestation. (Cetus Research and Conservation Society)
Image of humpback









  


David Lennam guest hosting this week!

Christie McMillan, a marine biologist in Alert Bay, gives an update on Canuck, the humpback whale entangled in fishing gear that has been spotted in the Strait of Georgia.

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Could nurses help fill the need for anesthetiia in B.C. hospitals? David peaks with Rita Schreiber who is a professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Victoria.

 
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Dr. Bonnie Henry, the director of public health emergency services for the BC Centre for Disease Control, talks about a new clinic and research study on Lyme disease and other chronic illnesses, following studies which found under-reporting and inadequate testing of Lyme disease.

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Chasing parking violators, Denman school bus squeeze, lifehacking explained and solo dining

Guest host David Lennam talks with the city's director of engineering about a proposal to get ICBC's help in collecting one million dollars in unpaid parking fines.

 
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Parent George McFaul talks about the policy that gives priority to English-language students over French Immersion for seats on the school bus taking children from Denman and Hornby Islands to Courtenay.

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Guest host David Lennam talks with Mike Vardy about "lifehacking"; the tips for improving productivity in pursuits ranging from computer programming to making a cup of tea.

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For seniors, eating alone isn't just boring. It can be a health problem. Alistair Hicks of of the Home Instead Senior Care Network talks about a new study on the subject. 

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Helping a humpback, renaming Canada's military, decoding Lyme disease and UVic parkade

humpback.jpg
(roy.luck/Flickr)
Paul Cottrell of Fisheries and Oceans Canada talks about the efforts to locate and help an entangled humpback whale in the Strait of Georgia.

 
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Retired Admiral Ken Summers discusses the reversion of Canadian Armed Forces to the original names for its three sectors: The Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army, and the Royal Canadian Air Force. 

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A leading researcher on Lyme disease talks about what scientists are learning about the bacteria that is spread by a tiny tick's bite.

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The University of Victoria is getting opposition to its plan to build a new sports centre with a seven storey parkade.  Neil Connelly, the UVic director of campus planning, discussing the proposal.

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Gold-panning, Lyme crusader, new off-road rules and preventing lead poisoning

Brian Marshall  of the Vancouver Island Placer Miners Association gives a gold-panning tutorial to reporter Michael Tymchuk.

(photo by deltaMike/Flickr)
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Dr. Ernie Murakami discusses his continuing efforts to promote wider diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in B.C. and Canada, three years after he was pressured into retirement and characterized as a "zealot" by the B.C. College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

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Steve Thomson, the B.C. Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, talks about plans to introduce new regulations affecting the use of off road vehicles ranging from motorcycles to all-terrain trikes and quads to snowmobiles.

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Kelvin Telmer, a University of Victoria geochemist, discusses the epidemic of lead poisoning among gold miners and children in Nigeria and how it can be stopped.

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Halting Hydro's rate increases, challenging the bike helmet law and homeless support group folds

Big changes underway at BC Hydro following a review of  proposed rate increases of close to 30 per cent. The rate increases have been halved and Hydro's  planning huge job cuts  and a complete re-working of the way it does business. We hear from B.C.'s Energy Minister Rich Coleman and speak with CBC Legislative reporter Stephen Smart.

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Does the helmet law actually make cycling  less safe? Margaret Gallagher explores the debate over compulsory bike helmets, which is the subject of a court challenge. 

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Betty O'Leary. co-founder of the Hope Outreach Society, talks about why the group,which offers services for Campbell River's homeless, called it quits this week because it can't find a home for itself.

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Hornby Island postal woes, a new transit plan for Victoria and rooftop gulls

Delivering the mail on Hornby Island. We'll speak with a local mail carrier who has delivered the mail for seventeen years,and now is looking for another job.
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All aboard for the billion dollar rapid transit project? We'll speak with Victoria Regional Transit Commissioner John Luton.
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Naturalist George Sirk and Khalil meet a flock of rooftop seagulls.
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First Nations supports development, Westshore questions LRT plan, breaking ground on a new Tsawout longhouse

 Both sides in the debate over the Juan de Fuca Shores development claim they have the support of the local First Nation.  On The Island's Michael Tymchuk heads to the Pachedaht First Nation to find out who is right. 

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Politicians and residents rally for LRT in Victoria but Dan Spinner from the Westshore Chamber of Commerce says support for the proposed billion-dollar project says the Western Communiites aren't jumping on board for the project.

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Eric Pelkey, the Treaty and Cultural officer with the Tsawout First Nation, talks about this weekend's fundraiser for rebuilding their longhouse, which was destroyed by fire two years ago.

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Reviews:

Theatre Review - Fire

Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Swaggart creates an inflammable mixture which forms the basis of the play "Fire". David Lennam reviews the season closer for Victoria's Blue Bridge Theatre. 
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Report from the riots, STI e-cards, following the gold rush and the Pacheedaht perspective

inside-london-riots-rtr2pqr.jpg
On the Island alumnus Rosie Westwood, now a freelance journalist in London, reports on the riots in that city and other towns and cities throughout England.

A police officer stands guard as firefighters work to
extinguish the flames of a blazing store in Woolwich, southeast London,
on Tuesday. (Jon Boyle/Reuters)





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Dr. Mark Gilbert of the BC Centre for Disease Control discusses the new e-card program that allows people to anonymously email their sexual partners to tell them they may have a sexually transmitted infection.

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The financial crisis in the U.S. has a lot of people selling stocks, and a lot of people selling their gold. The CBC's Margaret Gallagher went to find out who's buying, and who's selling.

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On the Island's Michael Tymchuk visits the Pacheedaht First Nation for that community's perspective on a proposed resort near the Juan de Fuca Trail that is being loudly debated by environmentalists and politicians.

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Cowichan Valley MRIs, Victoria's thriving tourism and drunk driving fairness

MRI machine
Vancouver Island Health Authority is taking a second look at mobile magnetic resonance imaging services. (CBC)

MLA Bill Routley talks about the efforts to get mobile MRI machines for the Cowichan Valley, after the Vancouver Island Health Authority reconsiders the possibility of getting a mobile diagnostic imaging service for the region.

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You might think cool weather and a high dollar would hurt Victoria's tourism industry this summer, but Tourism Victoria CEO Rob Gialorreto says business has actually improved.

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 The Superintendent of Motor Vehicles in B.C. responds to questions about whether some people caught for drinking and driving could get preferential treatment under new impaired driving laws. Questions were raised by civil liberties advocates following the secret handling of a case involving the assistant chief of the Esquimalt Fire Department. 

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You can also listen to the Aug. 5 interview on this topic with Rob Holmes of the BC Civil Liberties Association. 

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Gabriola manhunt, the Ledge Guys, bio-fuel boosters and justice impaired


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Police search Gabriola Island for murder suspect .
Keeping calm on Gabriola: Island resident Carol Ramsay talks about local reaction to a violent stabbing and murder on Wednesday night.

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CBC Legislative reporters Jeff Davies and Stephen Smart discuss today's deadline for submitting ballots for the HST referendum, and what the outcome could mean for Premier Christy Clark and the Liberals, and the future of mail-in voting in British Columbia. 

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Bio-fuel fans from across the globe are gathered in the Cowichan Valley this weekend. Jessy Bradish, one of the organizers talks about the international conference they're attending. 

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Rob Holmes of the BC Civil Liberties Association discusses concerns with the province's new drunk-driving law and whether it can be used to favour the well-connected, following the report of a fire department official in Esquimalt whose drinking-driving case was handled without charges or publicity. 

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Music fest move, dealing with derelict ships and Kwakiutl treaty protest

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Ash Berry Farm is the new venue for the Big Time Out music festival. (Google Earth)

The Big Time Out music festival moves from Cumberland to a fruit grower's field after security concerns cancel the original location. Artistic director Vig Schulman talks about safety at the new venue.
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Nanaimo-Cowichan MP Jean Crowder discusses derelict boats in Cowichan Bay and her efforts to get the federal government to assume some responsibility for these unwanted ships.
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Coreen Child, the elected chief of the Kwakiutl First Nation, discusses the band's protest at the Port McNeill ferry dock and their claim that the B.C. government is disregarding the band's aboriginal title and its Douglas Treaty rights.
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Squirrel registry, privatizing SAR, Sunday market, Big Time Out fest and addiction risk factors

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Eastern grey squirrel. Photo credit: Michael Scheltgen/Flickr

Liz Gillis, a researcher and faculty member at Vancouver Island University, wants public help in documenting the spread of this invasive species on the Island. 

You can register your own grey squirrel sightings at this website.

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Courtenay Mayor Greg Phelps responds to suggestions that military rescue operations based in the Comox Valley could be turned over to the private sector. 

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Thea Harris, organizer of Victoria's Sunday Market (formerly the Government Street Market), explains why market vendors are tired of setting up shop in two different locales every week.

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Big-time doubt for the Big Time Out: Cumberland Councillor Leslie Baird discusses the status of efforts to relocate one of Vancouver Island's most popular festivals after its original venue was scuttled by security concerns.
 
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Why some of us can't "just say no". Gordon Harper of the Umbrella Society for Addictions and Mental Health discusses why some people such as Amy Winehouse become casualties of addiction, while others may dabble with drugs and alcohol but avoid or overcome it.

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Protesting a torture ship, Cumberland dumping, decoding malaria and airport living

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The Chilean tall ship Esmeralda is docked in Victoria amid protest over its former use as a torture ship by the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in the 1970s. Photo credit: mireyapeters/Flickr
A Chilean tall ship once used to torture captives has docked in Victoria. Local activist Carlos Flores explains why opponents want it banned from all Canadian ports. 

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Former Cumberland mayor Bronco Moncrief discusses his concern that the community's landfill could become the dumping ground for the entire district.

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University of Victoria researcher Martin Boulanger discusses new research that could mark a significant step  in winning the war against malaria and other parasites.The assistant professor of biochemistry and microbiology and his co-authors have discovered how malaria and a number of other parasites penetrate cells.

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Port Alberni video producer Jaeger Mah talks about being a finalist in a contest whose winner will spend 80 days and 80 nights in Vancouver's international airport. On purpose. 

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Here's Jaeger Mah's entry for the Live@YVR contest. Voting continues until August 5., 2011.


Download today's podcast (runs 28:51)