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On The Coast
with Stephen Quinn

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Master of Wine Barb Philip's prosecco recomendations

Recommendations - Prosecco

Riondo Prosecco Frizzante DOC. Veneto. 12.99

Vaporetto Prosecco Brut DOC. Veneto. 17.29

Valdo Prosecco 'Marco Oro' DOCG. Veneto. 18.29

Val d'Oca Prosecco Extra Dry DOCG. Rive di Colbertaldo. 2014. 27.29

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for albacore tuna and grain salad

ALBACORE TUNA TATAKI WITH ANCIENT GRAIN SALAD, AVOCADO + SOY GINGER VINAIGRETTE

Recipe courtesy of Executive Chef Quang Dang, West Restaurant

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS
1 pc albacore tuna loin
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 lemon, sliced in sixths for garnish

DIRECTIONS
Gently rub the tuna loin with olive oil. Heat a non-stick or cast iron sauté pan until it becomes very hot. Sear the tuna on all sides, approximately 10 seconds per side, rotating carefully with tongs. Remove from heat and rest on a wire rack.

FOR THE ANCIENT GRAIN SALAD:

INGREDIENTS
3 cups Casbah Ancient Grain Blend, cooked
1 lemon
Small handful flat leaf parsley, chopped

DIRECTIONS
At West we cook each of the five grains separately; however, the Casbah Ancient Grain Blend is a good substitute. Prepare it as per the instructions on the package. Add the parsley and a squeeze of lemon for brightness when 'fluffing' the grains with a fork.

FOR THE SOY GINGER VINAIGRETTE:

INGREDIENTS

1 Tbsp            ginger, peeled and finely minced
1 Tbsp            garlic, finely minced
2 pcs            shallots, finely minced
1 tsp            mustard powder
2 Tbsp             soy sauce
2 Tbsp            rice wine vinegar
2 Tbsp            sesame oil
2 Tbsp            extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp            togorashi

DIRECTIONS
In a bowl, combine all ingredients and thoroughly dress the grains before serving. Slice the tuna and place the slices over the grain, and spoon over remaining marinade. Add the lemon garnish and serve.

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for arctic char and white asparagus

Ocean Wise Arctic Char with maple mustard glaze, parsley garlic purée,
white asparagus, 63°c egg, watermelon radish, potato gnocchi

Recipe courtesy of Alex Chen, Executive Chef
Boulevard Kitchen & Oyster Bar


4 servings

Parsley Coulis: Yield 1.5 cups

Ingredients:

4 cups (packed) flat leave parsley, no stems

1 cup 2% milk

½ cup Heavy cream

2 medium shallots cut into 2 cm

10 garlic cloves stems remove

pinch kosher salt


Directions:

Remove stems from parsley
Bring a large pot of salted water to a rapid boil
Blanch parsley in salted water for 60 seconds
Drain and cool
Squeeze parsley dry with your hands
Bring cream, milk, shallot, garlic and salt to a boil
Let simmer for 20 minutes or until garlic cloves are soft
Add parsley into the milk mixture and adjust seasoning
Puree on high in a blender till smooth
Cool down on ice to preserve color
Wrap with saran wrap directly on the purée to prevent a skin

Potato Gnocchi: 4 servings

Ingredients:

2 potatoes

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 egg

Pinch kosher salt

Pinch black pepper

1 tsp finely grated parmesan

3 tsp finely chopped chives

Pinch of nutmeg


Directions:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil
Peel potatoes and add to pot
Cook until tender but still firm (approx. 15 minutes)
Drain, cool and mash
Combine mashed potato with all other ingredients in a large bowl
Knead until dough forms a ball
Shape small portions of dough into long dowels
On a floured surface, cut snakes into half inch pieces
Bring a large pot of slightly salted water to a boil
Drop in gnocchi and cook for 3-5 minutes or until gnocchi has risen to the top
Drain

Mustard Glaze: Yield 2 cups

2 medium shallots finely diced

1 ¾ cup grainy mustard

2 cloves finely diced garlic

1 cup maple syrup

Zest ¾ of an orange

3 turns fresh cracked black pepper


Method:

Mix everything in a mixing bowl

White Asparagus:

Ingredients:

4 pieces white asparagus

2 cups 2% milk

2 cloves garlic

2 sprigs of thyme

3 pinches kosher salt

Bay leaf


Method:

In a bowl, place in water with a squeeze of lemon
In a medium saucepan over medium heat, add milk, thyme, salt, and bay leaf
Crush garlic and add
Simmer
Cut each piece of asparagus into 3 even pieces on the bias
Place in pot with other ingredients
Simmer until tender
Check doneness but piercing asparagus with a pairing knife, it is done if there is no resistance

Arctic Char:

Pre-heat oven to 350°F

2 scaled filets
Cut each in half
Season with salt and pepper
Sear skin side in a hot pan to crisp skin
Spread mustard glaze on top of each piece
Bake in oven for approx 6 minutes  

Assembly:

Slowly warm parsley coulis in small pot
Soft poach an egg
Hot water
1 cap white vinegar
Do not overcook!
In a pan melt a tbsp of butter on med-high heat until foamy
Add gnocchi and sear until golden brown
Add asparagus and sear
Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice
Spoon coulis onto the center of the plate and spread into a small circle
Arrange 6 pieces of gnocchi and 3 pieces of asparagus around coulis
Place arctic char on top of coulis
Season egg with salt and pepper and place beside arctic char
Cut yolk before serving

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for arctic char and white asparagus

Ocean Wise Arctic Char with maple mustard glaze, parsley garlic purée,
white asparagus, 63°c egg, watermelon radish, potato gnocchi

Recipe courtesy of Alex Chen, Executive Chef
Boulevard Kitchen & Oyster Bar


4 servings

Parsley Coulis: Yield 1.5 cups

Ingredients:

4 cups (packed) flat leave parsley, no stems

1 cup 2% milk

½ cup Heavy cream

2 medium shallots cut into 2 cm

10 garlic cloves stems remove

pinch kosher salt


Directions:

Remove stems from parsley
Bring a large pot of salted water to a rapid boil
Blanch parsley in salted water for 60 seconds
Drain and cool
Squeeze parsley dry with your hands
Bring cream, milk, shallot, garlic and salt to a boil
Let simmer for 20 minutes or until garlic cloves are soft
Add parsley into the milk mixture and adjust seasoning
Puree on high in a blender till smooth
Cool down on ice to preserve color
Wrap with saran wrap directly on the purée to prevent a skin

Potato Gnocchi: 4 servings

Ingredients:

2 potatoes

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 egg

Pinch kosher salt

Pinch black pepper

1 tsp finely grated parmesan

3 tsp finely chopped chives

Pinch of nutmeg


Directions:

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil
Peel potatoes and add to pot
Cook until tender but still firm (approx. 15 minutes)
Drain, cool and mash
Combine mashed potato with all other ingredients in a large bowl
Knead until dough forms a ball
Shape small portions of dough into long dowels
On a floured surface, cut snakes into half inch pieces
Bring a large pot of slightly salted water to a boil
Drop in gnocchi and cook for 3-5 minutes or until gnocchi has risen to the top
Drain

Mustard Glaze: Yield 2 cups

2 medium shallots finely diced

1 ¾ cup grainy mustard

2 cloves finely diced garlic

1 cup maple syrup

Zest ¾ of an orange

3 turns fresh cracked black pepper


Method:

Mix everything in a mixing bowl

White Asparagus:

Ingredients:

4 pieces white asparagus

2 cups 2% milk

2 cloves garlic

2 sprigs of thyme

3 pinches kosher salt

Bay leaf


Method:

In a bowl, place in water with a squeeze of lemon
In a medium saucepan over medium heat, add milk, thyme, salt, and bay leaf
Crush garlic and add
Simmer
Cut each piece of asparagus into 3 even pieces on the bias
Place in pot with other ingredients
Simmer until tender
Check doneness but piercing asparagus with a pairing knife, it is done if there is no resistance

Arctic Char:

Pre-heat oven to 350°F

2 scaled filets
Cut each in half
Season with salt and pepper
Sear skin side in a hot pan to crisp skin
Spread mustard glaze on top of each piece
Bake in oven for approx 6 minutes  

Assembly:

Slowly warm parsley coulis in small pot
Soft poach an egg
Hot water
1 cap white vinegar
Do not overcook!
In a pan melt a tbsp of butter on med-high heat until foamy
Add gnocchi and sear until golden brown
Add asparagus and sear
Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice
Spoon coulis onto the center of the plate and spread into a small circle
Arrange 6 pieces of gnocchi and 3 pieces of asparagus around coulis
Place arctic char on top of coulis
Season egg with salt and pepper and place beside arctic char
Cut yolk before serving

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Master of Wine Barb Philip's "Classic France" recomendations

Château La Gravelle Muscadet Sèvre et Maine. Loire Valley. 2012. 15.69

Jadot 'Cuvée des Jacobins' Bourgogne Chardonnay. Burgundy. 2012. 26.29

Les Dauphins Côtes du Rhône Réserve. Rhône Valley. 2013. 13.99

Château Pey la Tour Réserve. Bordeaux. 2010. 21.69

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for dulce de leche buttermilk ice cream

I have combined Smitten Kitchen's Buttermilk Ice Cream and Dulce de Leche Ice Cream recipes to come up with a recipe that is the best of both worlds.

Yield Serves 4

Ingredients

1 cup (250 mL) heavy cream

3/4 cup (190 mL) dulce de leche (purchased, or homemade, see Aside)

6 large egg yolks

1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk

1 tbsp (15 mL) vanilla or one whole vanilla bean, scraped and simmered with the cream

Pinch of salt

Sprinkling of edible gold flake

What You Do

1) In a large, heavy saucepan, combine the heavy cream and dulce de leche and bring to a simmer over medium heat.

2) In a large bowl, whisk egg yolks.

3) Remove the cream mixture from the heat and drizzle a small amount into the yolks, slowly, and whisking constantly to keep the eggs from curdling. Do this a few more times to warm up the yolks before pouring the yolk mixture back into the cream, whisking non-stop.

4) Cook over low heat until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.

5) Strain the mixture and whisk in the buttermilk, vanilla and salt. Cool completely and freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's directions.

6) Serve topped with a sprinkling of edible gold flake.

completely and freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's directions.

6) Serve topped with a sprinkling of edible gold flake.

Aside: Dulce de Leche

When Argentines move to another country, one of the things they miss, aside from their family, is dulce de leche (pronounced "DOOL-seh deh LEH-cheh," meaning candy of milk or milk jelly in Spanish)--a creamy sweet, caramelized milk-and-sugar concoction found in almost every Argentinean pantry. There are many different ways of making it--in a saucepan, in a double boiler, in the microwave, in the oven, in a pressure cooker--the simplest being to heat a tin of sweetened condensed milk in a saucepan of water on top of your stove. The Russians call it "Boiled Condensed Milk" but that's not nearly so poetic as dulce de leche.

Dulce de leche is said to have originated in 1829 in the providence of Cañuelas in Buenos Aires (though the French have their own version of its origin dating back to Napoleon's day.) It's a long story involving a war, a couple of generals, a treaty and a maid who forgot the milk boiling on the stove. When things end up burnt in my kitchen there isn't usually a happy ending. My burnt messes never end up starring in a Winning Desserts of the World cookbook. They go over the cliff onto the riverbank where the ravens and eagles do daily fly-by's hoping for a fiasco in my kitchen.

Ingredients

One 14 oz (414 mL) can of sweetened condensed milk

What You Do

1) Remove the label from the can of condensed milk. If you leave it on, you'll get a papery mess in the water. Yuck.

2) Pierce two holes, on opposite sides of the can, with a can opener. Do not skip this step. Without these holes, the can may bulge and there is the danger of it exploding.

3) Place the can in a small saucepan and fill it with enough water to come up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the top of the can. You will need to add more water during the cooking process to make sure water doesn't go below this level as it evaporates. Don't let the water come higher than 1/2 inch (1 cm) from the top of can, though, as you don't want any getting on the top of the can and seeping into the holes you pierced. Another mess in the water. Yuck again.

4) To prevent the can from rattling in the water (which I would find extremely annoying considering it is likely to be rattling for at least 3 hours) put a cloth (a face cloth will do) under the can.

5) Place the pot on your stove and turn it on to medium-high heat. Watch the water closely until you see it come to a simmer.

6) Lower the heat to hold the water at a simmer. Some of the condensed milk might escape through the holes. If this happens, scoop it off with a spoon. Try not to let any spill over into the water. (Remember how I warned about a mess?)

7) Wait. And wait some more. How long you wait depends on the type of dulce de leche you want. A soft dulce de leche takes about 3 hours. A firm dulce de leche will take up to 4 hours.

8) Remove the can with tongs and place on a rack to cool.

9) Open the can carefully with a can opener and pour into a bowl. The top will be more fluid, and there will be thicker, darker chunks at the bottom that will need to be scraped out. When everything is in the bowl, whisk together to make it homogeneous and smooth.


Yield: One can = 1 1/4 cups (310 mL) dulce de leche. I processed 4 cans at one and got 5 cups (1.25 L) and--what else?--froze what I didn't use, for future use.

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for dulce de leche buttermilk ice cream

I have combined Smitten Kitchen's Buttermilk Ice Cream and Dulce de Leche Ice Cream recipes to come up with a recipe that is the best of both worlds.

Yield Serves 4

Ingredients

1 cup (250 mL) heavy cream

3/4 cup (190 mL) dulce de leche (purchased, or homemade, see Aside)

6 large egg yolks

1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk

1 tbsp (15 mL) vanilla or one whole vanilla bean, scraped and simmered with the cream

Pinch of salt

Sprinkling of edible gold flake

What You Do

1) In a large, heavy saucepan, combine the heavy cream and dulce de leche and bring to a simmer over medium heat.

2) In a large bowl, whisk egg yolks.

3) Remove the cream mixture from the heat and drizzle a small amount into the yolks, slowly, and whisking constantly to keep the eggs from curdling. Do this a few more times to warm up the yolks before pouring the yolk mixture back into the cream, whisking non-stop.

4) Cook over low heat until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.

5) Strain the mixture and whisk in the buttermilk, vanilla and salt. Cool completely and freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's directions.

6) Serve topped with a sprinkling of edible gold flake.

completely and freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's directions.

6) Serve topped with a sprinkling of edible gold flake.

Aside: Dulce de Leche

When Argentines move to another country, one of the things they miss, aside from their family, is dulce de leche (pronounced "DOOL-seh deh LEH-cheh," meaning candy of milk or milk jelly in Spanish)--a creamy sweet, caramelized milk-and-sugar concoction found in almost every Argentinean pantry. There are many different ways of making it--in a saucepan, in a double boiler, in the microwave, in the oven, in a pressure cooker--the simplest being to heat a tin of sweetened condensed milk in a saucepan of water on top of your stove. The Russians call it "Boiled Condensed Milk" but that's not nearly so poetic as dulce de leche.

Dulce de leche is said to have originated in 1829 in the providence of Cañuelas in Buenos Aires (though the French have their own version of its origin dating back to Napoleon's day.) It's a long story involving a war, a couple of generals, a treaty and a maid who forgot the milk boiling on the stove. When things end up burnt in my kitchen there isn't usually a happy ending. My burnt messes never end up starring in a Winning Desserts of the World cookbook. They go over the cliff onto the riverbank where the ravens and eagles do daily fly-by's hoping for a fiasco in my kitchen.

Ingredients

One 14 oz (414 mL) can of sweetened condensed milk

What You Do

1) Remove the label from the can of condensed milk. If you leave it on, you'll get a papery mess in the water. Yuck.

2) Pierce two holes, on opposite sides of the can, with a can opener. Do not skip this step. Without these holes, the can may bulge and there is the danger of it exploding.

3) Place the can in a small saucepan and fill it with enough water to come up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the top of the can. You will need to add more water during the cooking process to make sure water doesn't go below this level as it evaporates. Don't let the water come higher than 1/2 inch (1 cm) from the top of can, though, as you don't want any getting on the top of the can and seeping into the holes you pierced. Another mess in the water. Yuck again.

4) To prevent the can from rattling in the water (which I would find extremely annoying considering it is likely to be rattling for at least 3 hours) put a cloth (a face cloth will do) under the can.

5) Place the pot on your stove and turn it on to medium-high heat. Watch the water closely until you see it come to a simmer.

6) Lower the heat to hold the water at a simmer. Some of the condensed milk might escape through the holes. If this happens, scoop it off with a spoon. Try not to let any spill over into the water. (Remember how I warned about a mess?)

7) Wait. And wait some more. How long you wait depends on the type of dulce de leche you want. A soft dulce de leche takes about 3 hours. A firm dulce de leche will take up to 4 hours.

8) Remove the can with tongs and place on a rack to cool.

9) Open the can carefully with a can opener and pour into a bowl. The top will be more fluid, and there will be thicker, darker chunks at the bottom that will need to be scraped out. When everything is in the bowl, whisk together to make it homogeneous and smooth.


Yield: One can = 1 1/4 cups (310 mL) dulce de leche. I processed 4 cans at one and got 5 cups (1.25 L) and--what else?--froze what I didn't use, for future use.

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Master of Wine Barb Philip's rosé recomendations

Spierhead Winery Pinot Noir Rosé. 2014. Okanagan Valley. $18.00

Cesarini Trento Brut Rosé. N/V.Trentino Alto Adige. Italy. $25.99

L'Ostal Cazes Rosé. Pays d'Oc. 2014. Languedoc. France. $14.99

Pétale de Rosé Côtes de Provence Rosé. 2014. Provence. France. $20.99

Elixir Côtes de Provence Rosé. 2014. Provence. France. $22.99

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for rhubarb rose gimlet

Rhubarb Rose Gimlet

Reprinted with permission from Seven Spoons by Tara O'Brady. (Random House, 2015).

A nearby distillery makes a rose gin, and the Christmas they released their first batch, I went a bit overboard giving it as gifts. One of my favorite cocktails had long been a rhubarb gimlet, and during that gin-filled holiday, I started making fancied-up ones with frozen garden rhubarb, rose water, and Prosecco. It's now the favorite.

Gimlets are classically shaken with ice and served in a cocktail glass, but I go rogue and reach for a Collins or Old Fashioned glass instead, depending on how icy I want it to be. I tend to like this with a lot of ice, so it is cold enough to cause a shiver.

For the gin, steer clear of anything that will be at odds with the syrup; London Dry is a good match.

RHUBARB SYRUP
1/2 cup (100 g) sugar
12 ounces (340 g) rhubarb, chopped into chunks
1/2 cup (120 ml) water
2 pieces lime zest, each 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide

COCKTAILS
Rose water
8 lime wedges ice
16 ounces (500 ml) gin
8 ounces (250 ml) Prosecco or Cava

To make the syrup, sprinkle the sugar over the rhubarb in a heavy saucepan. Macerate at room temperature for 30 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the water and lime zest, with a few gentle stirs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then lower the heat to maintain a simmer until the rhubarb has collapsed and the juices are thick, about 12 minutes. Discard the lime zest, then strain the syrup into a clean pitcher through a fine-meshed strainer--fork through the solids to release any trapped juice, but resist the temptation to press on the stalks or the syrup will be irrevocably clouded. Set aside the rhubarb for another use (see Note). If there is more than 1 cup (250 ml) syrup, return it to the saucepan and reduce over low heat until it is 1 cup, then cool. Refrigerate the syrup until cold.
To make each cocktail, in the glass of your choice, stir 1 ounce (30 ml) rhubarb syrup with a few drops of rose water. Squeeze in the juice from a lime wedge, then drop in the rind. Add a handful of ice, pour 2 ounces (60 ml) of gin over, and give everything a spin with a swizzle stick or spoon. Top up with 1 ounce (30 ml) of Prosecco. Cheers.
Ginger Gimlet Variation: Replace the lime zest in the syrup with a 1-inch (2.5 cm) knob of ginger, unpeeled and sliced into quarters. Omit the rose water and use ginger ale (page 250) instead of the Prosecco to provide some bubble.
NOTE: Spread the cooked rhubarb on a digestive biscuit or sugar cookie, or eat it with Greek-style yogurt, Glazed Sesame Oats (page 51), and a pour of rhubarb syrup.

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for rhubarb rose gimlet

Rhubarb Rose Gimlet

Reprinted with permission from Seven Spoons by Tara O'Brady. (Random House, 2015).

A nearby distillery makes a rose gin, and the Christmas they released their first batch, I went a bit overboard giving it as gifts. One of my favorite cocktails had long been a rhubarb gimlet, and during that gin-filled holiday, I started making fancied-up ones with frozen garden rhubarb, rose water, and Prosecco. It's now the favorite.

Gimlets are classically shaken with ice and served in a cocktail glass, but I go rogue and reach for a Collins or Old Fashioned glass instead, depending on how icy I want it to be. I tend to like this with a lot of ice, so it is cold enough to cause a shiver.

For the gin, steer clear of anything that will be at odds with the syrup; London Dry is a good match.

RHUBARB SYRUP
1/2 cup (100 g) sugar
12 ounces (340 g) rhubarb, chopped into chunks
1/2 cup (120 ml) water
2 pieces lime zest, each 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide

COCKTAILS
Rose water
8 lime wedges ice
16 ounces (500 ml) gin
8 ounces (250 ml) Prosecco or Cava

To make the syrup, sprinkle the sugar over the rhubarb in a heavy saucepan. Macerate at room temperature for 30 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the water and lime zest, with a few gentle stirs. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then lower the heat to maintain a simmer until the rhubarb has collapsed and the juices are thick, about 12 minutes. Discard the lime zest, then strain the syrup into a clean pitcher through a fine-meshed strainer--fork through the solids to release any trapped juice, but resist the temptation to press on the stalks or the syrup will be irrevocably clouded. Set aside the rhubarb for another use (see Note). If there is more than 1 cup (250 ml) syrup, return it to the saucepan and reduce over low heat until it is 1 cup, then cool. Refrigerate the syrup until cold.
To make each cocktail, in the glass of your choice, stir 1 ounce (30 ml) rhubarb syrup with a few drops of rose water. Squeeze in the juice from a lime wedge, then drop in the rind. Add a handful of ice, pour 2 ounces (60 ml) of gin over, and give everything a spin with a swizzle stick or spoon. Top up with 1 ounce (30 ml) of Prosecco. Cheers.
Ginger Gimlet Variation: Replace the lime zest in the syrup with a 1-inch (2.5 cm) knob of ginger, unpeeled and sliced into quarters. Omit the rose water and use ginger ale (page 250) instead of the Prosecco to provide some bubble.
NOTE: Spread the cooked rhubarb on a digestive biscuit or sugar cookie, or eat it with Greek-style yogurt, Glazed Sesame Oats (page 51), and a pour of rhubarb syrup.