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On The Coast
with Stephen Quinn

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Master of Wine Barbara Philip's Burgundy picks

Faiveley Bourgogne Pinot Noir. 2012. $22.99

La Chablisienne Chablis 'les Pierelee'. 2012. $24.39

Domaine du Chalet Pouilly-Fuissé 2012. $31.29

Domaine Maurice Ecard Savigny-les-Beaune 1er cru 'les Narbantons'. 2009. $31.29

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Master of Wine Barbara Philip's Burgundy picks

Faiveley Bourgogne Pinot Noir. 2012. $22.99

La Chablisienne Chablis 'les Pierelee'. 2012. $24.39

Domaine du Chalet Pouilly-Fuissé 2012. $31.29

Domaine Maurice Ecard Savigny-les-Beaune 1er cru 'les Narbantons'. 2009. $31.29

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for Charred Pepper Vinegar

Charred Pepper Vinegar

By Jonathan Chovancek
Executive Chef of Café Medina
Co-proprietor, Bittered Sling Bitters

 
This is a great way to re-use the bits of fruit and vegetable skins from the summer. You can substitute the pepper scraps with cherries, corn or grapes to make great tasting vinegars.

1 cup roasted pepper skins and flesh

1 Tbsp vinegar mother

4 Tbsp unpasteurized honey

4 cups H20

Place the roasted pepper skins in a 1 L sanitized Mason jar. Add the vinegar mother saved from a previous batch of vinegar or from a bottle of purchased raw vinegar. Combine the honey with the water and fill the jar leaving 1.5 cm of space at the top of the jar. Use a jar ring to fasten a square swatch of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar. Place in a safe place out of direct sunlight and allow to rest and culture over one to two weeks. Stir periodically, once a day. You may notice a raft forming on top of the vinegar, this is the cellulose and acetic acid bacteria and this is the fantastic mother which is now changing your pepper water into a delicious vinegar. Stir the mother back into the jar and continue the fermentation process. After two weeks, strain the whole ingredients from the jar through cheesecloth into a sanitized jar or bottle. Use a ph kit to determine the ph is between 3-4. If you need to continue to lower the ph with longer fermentation, cover the top of the jar with cheesecloth and ferment for another week. If you have a great tasting, sharp and acid vinegar you can now use it or seal in the bottle and allow to age in a dark cupboard for 2-6 months to develop the flavour. It will keep indefinitely in a dark, cool place.

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for Charred Pepper Vinegar

Charred Pepper Vinegar

By Jonathan Chovancek
Executive Chef of Café Medina
Co-proprietor, Bittered Sling Bitters

 
This is a great way to re-use the bits of fruit and vegetable skins from the summer. You can substitute the pepper scraps with cherries, corn or grapes to make great tasting vinegars.

1 cup roasted pepper skins and flesh

1 Tbsp vinegar mother

4 Tbsp unpasteurized honey

4 cups H20

Place the roasted pepper skins in a 1 L sanitized Mason jar. Add the vinegar mother saved from a previous batch of vinegar or from a bottle of purchased raw vinegar. Combine the honey with the water and fill the jar leaving 1.5 cm of space at the top of the jar. Use a jar ring to fasten a square swatch of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar. Place in a safe place out of direct sunlight and allow to rest and culture over one to two weeks. Stir periodically, once a day. You may notice a raft forming on top of the vinegar, this is the cellulose and acetic acid bacteria and this is the fantastic mother which is now changing your pepper water into a delicious vinegar. Stir the mother back into the jar and continue the fermentation process. After two weeks, strain the whole ingredients from the jar through cheesecloth into a sanitized jar or bottle. Use a ph kit to determine the ph is between 3-4. If you need to continue to lower the ph with longer fermentation, cover the top of the jar with cheesecloth and ferment for another week. If you have a great tasting, sharp and acid vinegar you can now use it or seal in the bottle and allow to age in a dark cupboard for 2-6 months to develop the flavour. It will keep indefinitely in a dark, cool place.

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Master of Wine Barbara Philip's red wine picks

Haywire Pinot Noir. Okanagan Valley. 2012. $23.00

Inniskillin Okanagan Estate Merlot. Okanagan Valley. 2012. $12.75

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for hot cross buns

Hot Cross Buns

Recipe courtesy of Bel Café chef Wayne Kozinko

Makes 36 Buns

Hot cross buns

1 tbsp & 1 tsp dry yeast
2 cup warm water
2 cup bread flour
2 cup pastry flour
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground nutmeg
5.5 oz sugar
1tbp & 1tsp salt
1/3 cup milk powder
1.75 tbsp butter
3 eggs
1 cup dried currant
1 cup yellow raisin
1 cup candy citrus
1 lemon, zest
1 orange, zest

Piping paste

.75 cup pastry flour
.33 cup canola oil
.75 cup water

Hot cross buns

Combine yeast and water, blend to combine. Add flour, blend to combine and let rest 30 minutes at room temp. Combine remaining dry ingredients, sift and add to starter. Add butter, eggs and zest, mix dough at 50 per cent for 2 minutes, then 80 per cent another 5 - 6 minutes. Add fruits, mix to incorporate.

Proof till dough had doubled in volume. Deflate, then divide into small rounds. Proof till double volume then bake 15 - 20 minutes in a 325 oven, pipe a cross of paste and bake another 5 minutes.

Piping paste

Sift the pastry flour and combine it with the vegetable oil. Slowly add water, stirring well after each addition, until the mixture reaches the consistency of very thick paste.

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for hot cross buns

Hot Cross Buns

Recipe courtesy of Bel Café chef Wayne Kozinko

Makes 36 Buns

Hot cross buns

1 tbsp & 1 tsp dry yeast
2 cup warm water
2 cup bread flour
2 cup pastry flour
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground nutmeg
5.5 oz sugar
1tbp & 1tsp salt
1/3 cup milk powder
1.75 tbsp butter
3 eggs
1 cup dried currant
1 cup yellow raisin
1 cup candy citrus
1 lemon, zest
1 orange, zest

Piping paste

.75 cup pastry flour
.33 cup canola oil
.75 cup water

Hot cross buns

Combine yeast and water, blend to combine. Add flour, blend to combine and let rest 30 minutes at room temp. Combine remaining dry ingredients, sift and add to starter. Add butter, eggs and zest, mix dough at 50 per cent for 2 minutes, then 80 per cent another 5 - 6 minutes. Add fruits, mix to incorporate.

Proof till dough had doubled in volume. Deflate, then divide into small rounds. Proof till double volume then bake 15 - 20 minutes in a 325 oven, pipe a cross of paste and bake another 5 minutes.

Piping paste

Sift the pastry flour and combine it with the vegetable oil. Slowly add water, stirring well after each addition, until the mixture reaches the consistency of very thick paste.

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Master of Wine Barbara Philip's Italian wine picks

Villa Locatelli. Friulano. Friuli. 2013 19.99
Monte del Frà Bardolino. Veneto. 2012 17.99
Braida Brachetto d'Acqui N/V. Piedmont. 29.99
Calatoni Bonarda. Oltrepò Pavese. 2012 19.99

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Master of Wine Barbara Philip's Italian wine picks

Villa Locatelli. Friulano. Friuli. 2013 19.99
Monte del Frà Bardolino. Veneto. 2012 17.99
Braida Brachetto d'Acqui N/V. Piedmont. 29.99
Calatoni Bonarda. Oltrepò Pavese. 2012 19.99

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Urban Foodie Anya Levykh's recipe for seared halibut

Seared Halibut, Sunchoke Puree, Sautéed Dandelion, Walnuts, Capers

By Chef Tret Jordan
Homer St. Cafe and Bar

Serves 4

"There is nothing that quite exemplifies spring than first-of-the-season Pacific local line-caught halibut."  - Chef Tret Jordan

Ingredients

For the Halibut:

4 fillets        Halibut, portion size of approximately 5-6 oz. each
2 tbsp        Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1        Whole lemon, cut into wedges
1 tsp        Coarse salt
2 tbsp        Unsalted butter
¼ cup        Walnut, toasted halves
1 tbsp        Capers

For the Sunchoke Puree:

1 cup        Sunchoke, washed and sliced into ½ inch slices
2 cups        Milk
1 tbsp         Butter
To Taste    Salt

For the Dandelion:

2 bunches    Dandelion, washed and chopped
1 tbsp        Olive oil
1 clove        Garlic, finely chopped
To taste    Salt
To taste     Pepper

Method

Start by making the sunchoke puree, which can be done ahead of time and stored until needed. Place the sliced sunchokes in a pot and cover with the milk. Simmer until the sunchokes are cooked and tender. Pour the sunchokes into a sieve, reserving the milk. Place sunchokes into a food processor and blend. Add a little of the cooking milk as needed, just enough to blend to a smooth puree. Finish by adding the butter and season with salt.  

The dandelion is quick to sauté and will only take a minute to cook. Heat a sauté pan on the stove on high heat. Add the olive oil and chopped dandelion; keep the dandelion moving in the pan. Add the garlic and sauté quickly. Season with salt and pepper.      

To cook the halibut, heat a suitable sized pan on the stove, med-high heat. Ensure the pan is large enough to accommodate the four fillets of halibut. Make sure the fish is dry by patting the halibut with paper towel. When the pan is hot, add the olive oil to the pan. Season the halibut with salt and gently lay the fish into the pan. Cook the fish on the one side for approximately 6-7 minutes. You want to make sure the fish has a nice golden crust before flipping the fillets. Once they are flipped, turn the heat down to low-med. Add the butter, walnuts, and capers to the pan and allow the butter to slowly foam and brown. As soon as the butter is golden brown, not burnt, squeeze a couple of the fresh lemon wedges over the fish. This will help stop the butter from browning any further.

To serve, place a spoonful of the puree on to the plates. Divide the sautéed dandelion equally between servings. Carefully set the halibut onto the dandelion and spoon the walnuts, capers and butter over the fish. Bon appetit!