ONTARIO VOTES 2007

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Your View

Are the parties fielding enough female candidates for the upcoming election?

September 18, 2007 | 12:10 PM

Candidate nominations closed on Sept. 18 for the Ontario election, with 597 hopefuls vying for the province's 107 seats on Oct. 10. About 25 per cent of those candidates are women.

The three main parties are fielding a total of 104 female candidates. The advocacy group Equal Voice found that the main parties have nominated 22 per cent more women this year than they did in 2003.

The NDP leads the pack for female candidates with 42, while the Liberals have 38 and the Conservatives 24.

Both the NDP's Howard Hampton and the Liberal's Dalton McGuinty say they are satisfied with the number of women running for their parties, while PC Leader John Tory says his party still has more work to do in this regard.

Watch Katrina Roman report on female candidates (Runs 2:31).

Do you think the parties are fielding enough female candidates? Are there barriers to women entering politics? If so, what are they and how can they be removed? Tell us your views.

« Going green in the Ontario election | Main | Should OHIP cover surgery in private clinics? »

This entry is now Closed. View the comments.

Comments: (11)

TorontoConservative (Toronto) wrote:

The gender balance in politics is an issue that distracts us from what really matters: higher quality politicians! Ontario needs better people in charge and if the majority of them are white, heterosexual males it is not a problem in any way.

Posted October 6, 2007 09:47 AM

D. Shields (Hamilton_Ont) wrote:

It's interesting that there are so many women involved in political activism, charity work to help those who have dropped through the system(s),& activism for various causes that often go against the current political grain. For some reason these same women do not run as candidates.

I think it's likely that women see the political system for what it is; Very Limiting in what it can do & involving a very long process to get things done on a Provincial or Federal level. I also think that women distrust the political process, & many of the people involved in it. We all know we have been lied to for decades on things like affordable day care, equal pay & opportunity.

Why invest time & effort in that same process?

Posted September 28, 2007 02:21 AM

anonymous (ottawa) wrote:

Speaking as a working woman, I feel very strongly that individuals should recieve a job based on merit, and not on their gender/race/religion. This is no different in politics. I want qualified people running this country. The ratio of women in the Legislature in irrelevant, and a politically correct argument which detracts from the important issues.

Posted September 25, 2007 12:51 PM

James B (Ottawa) wrote:

I think that the number of women candidates doesn't really reflect the real ability of women to participate in politics. Simply saying 25% candidates are women over simplifies the issue.

I'd like to know how many women are participating members of parties? How many seek nominations as candidates for each riding? How many women choose not to run for financial reasons? Family Reasons? Which parties are helping to deal with those issues?

I know a "Democratic Audit" by a number of universities ranked the NDP as the best party in terms of providing recruitment and support for women, and visible minorities to participate in politics. However, all NDP members recruited still have to be elected by their riding association.

Again I think the issue is over simplified by only counting the number of women candidates.

Posted September 25, 2007 12:40 PM

Mr. X (Ottawa) wrote:

Male or female, it doesn't matter...as long as their doing their job ethically and effectively. Once again..Politically Correctness shadowing the true points of this election:

Accountability
Safety / Security
The Economy
Exorbitant Taxes
Infrastructure
Energy

Shake your heads folks....a gender doesn't make a good politician and representative.

Posted September 25, 2007 09:30 AM

Wendy Klein (Ottawa) wrote:

I guess I would like to live in a country that values the voice of women enough to adjust the political process to allow 50% of our parliament to be women. If this means adjusting the funding formula to provide the women who are willing to put in the time the money to run then that's what I would like to happen. If that is not enough then perhaps we need a greater adjustment to the political process.

We are no longer like an ape colony where the leader of the pack picks bugs off the others to gain support, and being leader means being the physically strongest defender of the pack.

Our Parliament makes significant decisions that affect our lives and should be equally reflective of both sexes.

Posted September 22, 2007 01:58 AM

David (NiagaraFalls) wrote:

I heard a discussion on the radio between veteran women politicions ... their point was very clear. Getting into politics takes a lot of time away from family life. Fewer women than men are prepared to do this. I guess this raises a big debate about traditional family make-up etc., but the fact is that it's an individual's right to decide how their family functions, and whether or not they then have the time or energy to get into politics.

Right now the answer for most women is no.

You can't mandate inclusion. You most certainly should mandate that there are no barriers to women getting involved.

Posted September 21, 2007 02:26 PM

Wendy Klein (Ottawa) wrote:

"All registered candidates and parties receiving at least 15% of the popular vote are entitled to receive a campaign expense subsidy. The subsidy entitlement is calculated at 20% of the spending limit, or 20% of total actual campaign expenses, whichever is less.
These subsidies are to help defray the cost of the campaign. “ from Ontario elections website.

In order to equalize the number of women in provincial parlement I suggest these campaign subsidies to be linked to sexual representation of candidates.

Thus for candidate subsidies a pool of money will be calculated. 50% of the subsidy pool will be devided among the female candidates, 50% to the male candidates. Initially this will give the female candidates much more money, eventually as more females run it will be even. If the distribution seems too unbalanced some of the excess could be given to independents if they can demonstrate some support

For the party subsidy in order for a party to receive the full subsidy 46%-54% of its candidates would have to be female. Other wise it would be docked as a function of its shortfall. This would best be done gradually with the formula changing slightly from the first to the next election. If ever we should get to an unbalance the other way this would be applied similiarly. The docked money should go toward supporting independant female candidates.
Ie:
female
candidates Party funding Party funding
first year subsequent years
45.1%-50% 100% 100%
40.1%-45% 90% 95%
45.6%-40% 80% 45%
30.1%-35% 70% 20%
25.6%-30% 60% 10%
20.1%-25% 50% 5%
15.1%-20% 40% 0%
10.1%-15% 30% 0%
0-10% 20% 0%

Please note these formulas were created without looking at or knowing how many females were running in the upcoming election.

Posted September 20, 2007 02:07 PM

Robert Blanchard (Calgary) wrote:

The reason there aren't more females in politics is because Canadian politics is extremely confrontational. Men are more confrontational then women.

The charter doesn't say all people are equal, it says we are equal in rights and dignity. We should accept the fact that men and women are inherently different. Equal people is for communists, equal opportunity is for Canada.

Posted September 20, 2007 06:08 AM

Jesse Snyder (Clifford) wrote:

I think we need to do more to get women into the legislature. When the legislature was dissolved, there were 26 women. Currently, women make up about 50% of society....clearly they are not being represented. I don't think enough is being done to get more women to run, or to win. Many parties have women running in ridings where they just won't win, because party loyalty is low. It's time to allow for Ontario to bring in MMP to open the way for more women to sit as MPPs. Call me an idealist, but I see that as a door opener to more women running and winning, instead of being appointed.

Posted September 20, 2007 12:00 AM

Jim (Toronto) wrote:

I don't think there's any real disparity between opportunities for men and women in politics right now. The real problem we stand to face is actually too many women. Now, before anyone jumps down my throat, think about equal opportunity employers, ones who are required to hire a certain portion of minorities.

If we begin to have elected officials who are appointed solely based on whether they're female, or we judge their merits based on this criteria, we stand to have ill-qualified leaders. As with everything else, and especially in politics, the positions should go to the most qualified, no matter their situation.

Posted September 18, 2007 04:18 PM

District Profiles

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Analysis Scottish referendum polls favour No side, with undecideds in play
On Thursday, Scots will decide whether to leave the United Kingdom and dissolve their union of more than three centuries. The latest polls suggest the outcome could be as close as the one that almost split Canada 19 years ago, writes analyst Éric Grenier.
Analysis U.S. is off to a war that doesn't make sense – again: Neil Macdonald
When U.S. President Barack Obama tried to build consensus last year for an air campaign against Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, the American public balked. But taking on ISIS is a whole other story, writes Neil Macdonald.
ISIS spreading out in Syria, blending in ahead of expected airstrikes
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has gone underground in its Syrian stronghold since President Barack Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes on the group in Syria, disappearing from the streets, redeploying weapons and fighters, and cutting down its media exposure.
more »

Canada »

Rob Ford's health: Update expected today video
An update is expected today on the health of Rob Ford, who has left the Toronto mayoral race to run in his former riding because of a tumour in his abdomen.
Analysis What Scotland independence crusader Alex Salmond learned from Quebec
Scotland's separatist leader was laying the groundwork for an independence vote during Quebec's referendum in 1995, Don Murray writes.
New Miramichi River salmon numbers hit record low in 2014
The world-famous Miramichi River is experiencing a salmon decline that "is among the worst in recorded history."
more »

Politics »

Harper sidestepped MPs on Supreme Court pick due to Nadon 'leaks'
Concerns over alleged leaks from the all-party panel of MPs that vetted the aborted Supreme Court appointment of Marc Nadon led the government to leave MPs out of the loop when it named Justice Clement Gascon to replace him, documents tabled in the House reveal.
Analysis Scottish referendum polls favour No side, with undecideds in play
On Thursday, Scots will decide whether to leave the United Kingdom and dissolve their union of more than three centuries. The latest polls suggest the outcome could be as close as the one that almost split Canada 19 years ago, writes analyst Éric Grenier.
Rob Nicholson insists military mental health service improving
Almost nine months after promising to make the hiring of mental health staff a priority for the Canadian Forces, 40 positions — nearly 10 per cent of the military's mental health workforce — remain vacant across the country.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

New Jackie Chan's son Jaycee formally arrested in drug case
Police in Beijing have formally arrested the son of Hong Kong martial arts film star Jackie Chan on suspicion of allowing other people to consume drugs, a charge that carries a maximum sentence of three years' imprisonment, prosecutors said Wednesday.
Leonardo DiCaprio named UN messenger of peace video
The United Nations has named actor Leonardo DiCaprio a UN Messenger of Peace with a special focus on climate change.
Barbra Streisand admits she doesn't sing at home video
Barbra Streisand opens up about her storied career, her life behind the scenes and her new album, Partners, in a Canadian broadcast exclusive with CBC's Jian Ghomeshi.
more »

Technology & Science »

Boeing, SpaceX to provide new ride to International Space Station
NASA is a giant step closer to launching Americans again from U.S. soil, after selecting Boeing and SpaceX as private partners to ferry crew to the International Space Station.
Video Colossal squid the size of a minibus examined by scientists
Scientists examined a 350-kilogram, minibus-sized colossal squid and streamed the event live on the web last night. See photos and a video replay here.
NASA Near-Earth Objects asteroid detection program slammed by audit
NASA's efforts to detect potentially dangerous asteroids are poorly coordinated, ill-managed, under-staffed, and falling far short of a goal to find most asteroids that threaten Earth by 2020, according to a new report.
more »

Money »

U.S. Steel Canada files for court-supervised protection
U.S. Steel Canada, citing years of operating losses, has filled for court-supervised protection to give the company a chance to restructure in hopes of being able to better compete in the North American steel industry.
Jim Prentice says many Alberta First Nations are behind new pipeline projects
Alberta Premier Jim Prentice says many First Nations in the province support constructing more pipelines out of the province.
Analysis What Scotland independence crusader Alex Salmond learned from Quebec
Scotland's separatist leader was laying the groundwork for an independence vote during Quebec's referendum in 1995, Don Murray writes.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Poll Blue Jays: Will they rally to earn a wild card spot? video
The Toronto Blue Jays’ playoff hopes took another hit following an 8-2 blowout loss to the Baltimore Orioles on Tuesday night. With 12 games remaining, can the Jays still rally to grab an AL wild card spot or has time run out?
Adrian Peterson made exempt from all Minnesota Vikings activities
The Minnesota Vikings have placed star running back Adrian Peterson on the exempt/commissioner's permission list, a move that will require him to stay away from the team while he addresses child abuse charges.
Before And After Giancarlo Stanton posts pictures of facial injuries
Miami Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton has made a remarkable improvement after getting drilled in the face by a pitch last Thursday. He updated his status with a side-by-side photo on his Instagram account.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »