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Ontario Votes 2003
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Election Day: Oct. 2, 2003   

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Letters from Oct. 1
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The promises McGuinty is making are impossible to implement. Already he is equivocating. The promises made by the NDP are of the same quality—fiscally impossible or economically damaging.

The cries of more of everything by the public are naive given the present economic situation. Should the Liberals win, it will be a sick process to watch as they flounder.

- Richard D. Field
 Toronto


In response to the writer who thinks cutting funding to Catholic schools is "a good idea:" when you're ready to re-write the Constitution of this country, we can discuss that. Until then, let's not forget that the three founding nations—the British (Protestants mostly, but also Catholics), the French (Catholics mostly) and the Natives—entered Confederation with the understanding that their linguistic and religious rights would be upheld.

Everyone has the Constitutional right to an education in English, French, and Native languages, as well as to an education in the Catholic system or the non-Catholic one (which, at the time, was comprised mostly of Protestants).

Don't knock the Catholic schools for fighting almost a century to claim their Constitutional rights to provide public Catholic education. Instead, it would be wise to leave behind the Harris-Tory culture of divisiveness, and support funding for new religious minorities where numbers warrant government support. If you disagree with that, let's put multiculturalism on the table again.

As for the private-school tuition tax credit: if your children don't attend a public school, that doesn't exempt you from paying your share of taxes. If a public service is to be funded adequately, all people must pay their share of tax into a public system, regardless of their level of participation in that system. If we were only to pay taxes selectively for the services we use, we would live in a user-fee system, and there would no longer be a public system with equal access for all.

Let's not forget that that the strong public services that emerged in the twentieth century—health care, education, and unemployment insurance—have been the chief determinants of a high standard of living in this country and in other countries with mixed economies. Without the guarantee of these services for all citizens, the boom-and-bust cycles of the free market would leave millions destitute, ruined, and devoid of the health care, education, and money required to live a decent life.

-Kosta Dimeropoulos
 Maple


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