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Ontario Votes 2003
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Main > Features > Door to Door
Election Day: Oct. 2, 2003   

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+ Forget the pre-packaged campaign platforms and the media take on what's important in the provincial election. CBC is going door to door, finding out what Ontarians think the parties should be promising. Follow along throughout the campaign as we compare those issues with what each party is promising.

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+ Teachers: Michael Sklazeski, Thunder Bay

healthMichael Sklazeski is a high school student in Thunder Bay. His election wish is to get more quality time with his teachers.
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The Plan
The NDP will introduce a charter of rights for education. It includes a section confirming every child's right to a public education that meets their needs and goals.
The Liberals will place a cap of 20 students per class in the early grades, up to grade 3.
The Conservatives will increase the resources available for provincial education inspectors. These inspectors will be directed to drop into classrooms, unannounced, to evaluate teacher performance.

+ Health Care: Dave Christensen, Lappe

healthDave Christensen is a prospector from Lappe, Ontario. He wants to see better
hospital services and shorter waiting lists this election.
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The Plan
The Conservatives say they will use innovative partnerships and financing to build new hospitals in fast growing communities, while maintaining their commitment to small and rural hospitals. They'll guarantee waiting times will not exceed medically recommended limits and promise to fly people to other cities, provinces or states to meet that guarantee.
The Liberals say they will place a moratorium on E.R. closures. They'll provide adequate, multi-year funding to both hospitals and health sciences centres. They'll set and meet maximum waiting times for tests and scans at public clinics.
The NDP say they'll cancel the expansion of private MRI and CT clinics and improve diagnostic services in public hospitals. They'll also cancel plans for private hospitals in Brampton and Ottawa in favour of public hospitals in those cities.

+ Health Care: Larry Washburn, Windsor

healthLarry Washburn is an accountant in Windsor who wants to see more doctors, and more specialists, in the Ontario health care system.
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The Plan
The Tories promise to ease the doctor shortage by making it easier for foreign-trained doctors to practice in Ontario. They also promise free tuition for medical students who agree to practice in under serviced areas.

The Liberals promise help for foreign trained doctors seeking accreditation. They also promise loan forgiveness to students who choose medicine, and pledge to increase space in medical schools by 15 per cent.

The NDP platform calls for a reduction in medical school tuition, and an expedited training and accreditation process for foreign trained doctors.

+ Roads: Jim Thompson, Sudbury

schoolsJim Thompson is the head of the Sudbury Chamber of Commerce, and he wants to see more money spent on roads this election.
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The Plan
The Progressive Conservatives list a number of highway projects they plan to tackle. This list includes the four-laning of Highway 69 to Sudbury. The Tories also pledge more than a billion dollars a year on highways, if they're re-elected.

The NDP plans to start a new Transportation Trust Fund dedicated to public transit and highway maintenance. The NDP would take 3 cents from the existing 14.7 cents a litre gas tax and put it toward transportation. The party says this would amount to about 470 million dollars a year.

The Liberals promise to invest in highway and road improvements to ensure access to critical trade links, starting with Windsor, Niagara and Sarnia. The Liberals say they would give municipalities 2 cents a litre from the gas tax to use for building roads and bridges, or improving transit.

+ Schools: Shelina Merani, Ottawa

schoolsShelina Merani, a young mother in Ottawa, wants schools to be more open and accountable.
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The Plan
The Liberals promise to make school boards more accountable, and to insure they have the resources and the flexibility to respond to local needs.

The Tories will require school boards to submit their
spending plans in advance, and will also appoint an
Ontario Education quality auditor to investigate how
all school boards spend their money.

The NDP say they will pass a Charter of Rights for Education, making excellent public education a legal right for every student.

+ Racism: John Fox, Thunder Bay

racismJohn Fox lives in Thunder Bay, and for him, the biggest issue this election is racism against aboriginals. 
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The Plan
The NDP say they will expand Aboriginal justice programs and revise the school curriculum to reflect the historic contributions of First Nations.
The Liberals say key services will reflect the needs of Aboriginal communities and where possible be delivered by them.
The Conservatives don't mention Aboriginal issues in their platform.

+ Pesticide: Carmel Gilrois, Sudbury

pesticideCarmel Gilrois runs a bed and breakfast in Sudbury. This election, she wants the province to do more about pesticide use.
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The Plan
The NDP platform says the party will implement a "Pesticide Reduction Strategy" and support municipalities that wish to ban cosmetic pesticide use.
The Liberal party doesn't mention pesticides in their platform. They say they'll leave it to municipalities to set the rules on pesticide use.
The Progressive Conservative party doesn't mention pesticides in their platform. They say they'll leave it to municipalities to set the rules on pesticide use.

+ Tuition: Sean Hannaford, Thunder Bay

tuitionSean Hannaford is in fourth year at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay. His top election issue is tuition fees.
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The Plan
The Liberals say they'll freeze college and university tuition for at least two years, and use that time to work with students, colleges and universities to create a long-term solution to rising education costs.
The NDP say they'll immediately cut college and university tuition by 10 per cent.
The Conservatives don't mention tuition in their platform.

+ Taxes: Keith Naimark, Thunder Bay

taxesKeith Naimark is publisher of Superior Choices, a seniors' newspaper in Thunder Bay. He wants to see tax increases this election.
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The Plan
The Conservatives say they'll cut personal income tax by 20 per cent in January. They also promise other tax breaks, such as increasing the tax credit for private school tuition, a break on property taxes for seniors, and tax credits for disabled people or family caregivers. There is also a proposal for a new mortgage interest tax break for homeowners.
The Liberals say they will hold the line on your taxes and those of corporations.
The NDP say they would add two new tax brackets in Ontario: one for people who earn more than $100,000 a year, and another for people who earn more than $150,000 a year.


+ Wages: Terry Smith, Sudbury

wagesTerry Smith, a retail worker in Sudbury, says minimum wage needs to be higher.
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The Plan
The Liberals say they will raise minimum wage to $8.00 over four years.
The Tory platform doesn't address minimum wage.
The New Democrats say they will increase minimum wage to $8.00 immediately.


+ Mergers: Keith Hipkins, Ridgetown

mergesFor Keith Hipkins, of Ridgetown, amalgamation is the most important issue this election.
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The Plan
The Tories make no mention of amalgamation in their platform. They say amalgamation is working for the province and won't consider reversals.
The Liberals promise an end to dictated municipal amalgamations from Queen's Park. But they have no plans to reverse any pre-existing amalgamations.
The NDP would consider reversing amalgamation in some areas, but only at the request of local governments.

 


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