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Ontario Votes 2003
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Main > Features > Inside the Eves cabinet
Election Day: Oct. 2, 2003   

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Inside the Eves Cabinet
 by Barry Brimbecom

Elizabeth WitmerElizabeth Witmer
(Kitchener-Waterloo)
Deputy Premier and Minister of Education
First Elected: 1990

Witmer was named Labour minister when Mike Harris came to power in 1995. She was moved to Health in 1997, and to the Environment ministry in 2001. She was the only woman to run against Eves for the Tory leadership in 2002. Within the Conservative caucus, she's seen as a moderate, and her appointment as Eves' deputy premier and education minister signaled a move to the centre for the Tories.

John BairdJohn Baird

(Nepean-Carleton)
Minister of Energy, Minister for Francophone Affairs,Government House Leader
First elected: 1995

Baird was parliamentary secretary to then-minister of finance Ernie Eves from 1997 to 1999, when he was named to the Harris cabinet as Minister of Community and Social Services. He was additionally named Minister Responsible for Children in 2001. Baird was named government whip when Eves became premier in 2002, butwas hustled into the energy portfolio later that year when it became clear that then-minister Chris Stockwell couldn't give his full attention to Ontario's looming power crisis while also overseeing the Ministry of the Environment. Baird was largely overshadowed by the premier during the great blackout of 2003, when Eves gave daily media briefings.

Brad ClarkBrad Clark

(Stoney Creek)
Minister of Labour
First elected: 1999

Clark became Transportation Minister in 2001, midway through his first term in the Legislature, and was moved to the Labour portfolio when Eves became premier.

Tony ClementTony Clement

(Brampton West- Mississauga)
Minister of Health and Long-Term Care
First elected: 1995

Clement was first elected in 1995 and named to cabinet in 1997 as transportation minister by then-premier Mike Harris. He moved to Health in 2001. Clement placed third in the contest to succeed Harris as Tory leader, but retained his the Health portfolio after throwing his support behind the eventual winner, Ernie Eves. Clement was highly visible during Ontario's outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, and his handling of the crisis led to speculation that he'd be a strong contended to replace Eves if the Tories were defeated in the 2003 election.

Brian CoburnBrian Coburn

(Ottawa-Orleans)
Minister of Tourism and Recreation
First elected: 1999

Coburn served as agriculture minister in the last days of the Harris government, but was demoted to Associate Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Rural Affairs) when Eves succeeded Harris as premier. He was elevated to Tourism Minister after Cam Jackson resigned the post during an investigation of his expense claims.

Dianne CunninghamDianne Cunningham

(London North Centre)
Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities
First elected: 1988

Cunningham was the only contender to run against Mike Harris for the Tory leadership in 1990. Harris named her to cabinet as Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and Minister Responsible for Women's Issues in 1995. She took on the Training, Colleges and Universities portfolio following the Tory election victory in 1999.

Carl DeFariaCarl DeFaria

(Mississauga East)
Minister of Citizenship, Minister Responsible for Seniors
First elected: 1995

DeFaria is a two-term MPP who got his first cabinet post when Eves became premier in 2002.

Janet EckerJanet Ecker

(Pickering-Ajax-Uxbridge)
Minister of Finance
First elected: 1995

Ecker was named Minister of Community and Social Services in 1996 by Mike Harris, where she introduced work-for-welfare legislation. She moved to Education in 1999, and was named Finance Minister when Eves became premier in 2002. She became a target of Tory critics after breaking with tradition to deliver the 2003/04 budget outside the Ontario Legislature.

Brenda ElliottBrenda Elliott

(Guelph-Wellington)
Minister of Community, Family and Children's Services
First elected: 1995

Elliott served as Minister of Environment and Energy from 1995 to1996, when she was dropped by then-premier Mike Harris. She was returned to the Harris cabinet in 2001 as Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, and was named Minister of Community, Family and Children's Services when Eves became premier in 2002.

Jim FlahertyJim Flaherty

(Whitby-Ajax)
Minister of Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation
First elected: 1995
A right-leaning adherent of the Common Sense Revolution, Flaherty served as Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Native Affairs, Minister of Labour, and Solicitor General and Minister of Correctional Services under former premier Mike Harris. He became Harris' finance minister and deputy premier when Eves retired from politics in 2001. After coming second to Eves in the Tory leadership race, he was demoted to the new Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation portfolio. Flaherty is seen as a Tory leader in waiting, and one who is eager to move the party right from the centrist policies introduced by Eves.

Doug GaltDoug Galt

(Northumberland)
Minister Without Portfolio and Chief Government Whip
First elected: 1995

Galt was appointed to cabinet in August 2002 during the shuffle that saw Energy and Environment split into two ministries.

Ernie HardemanErnie Hardeman

(Oxford)
Associate Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Rural Affairs)
First elected: 1995

Hardeman served as Agriculture minister under Harris from 1999 to 2001. He was returned to cabinet by Eves in 2003.

Tim HudakTim Hudak

(Erie-Lincoln)
Minister of Consumer and Business Services
First elected: 1995

Hudak was named Minister of Northern Development and Mines in June 1999. In 2001 he was appointed as Minister of Tourism, Culture and Recreation with responsibility for the Ontario Lottery & Gaming Corporation. When Eves became premier, Hudak was moved to Consumer and Business Services.

Helen JohnsHelen Johns

(Huron-Bruce)
Minister of Agriculture and Food
First elected: 1995

Johns' first cabinet post was as Minister of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation, with responsibility for both Seniors' and Women's issues. Prior to taking on the Agriculture portfolio, she was Associate Minister of Health.

Frank KleesFrank Klees

(Oak Ridges)
Minister of Transportation
First elected: 1995

Klees was appointed chief government whip and deputy house leader by Mike Harris in 1999. He was Minister of Tourism and Recreation before being named Transportation Minister in 2003. Klees is perhaps best known outside Ontario as an on-again-off-again candidate for the leadership of the federal Canadian Alliance party.

Tina MolinariTina Molinari

(Thornhill)
Associate Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing
First elected: 1999
This is Molinari's first cabinet post. She was named by Eves in 2002 following his victory in the Tory leadership race.

Dan NewmanDan Newman

(Scarborough Southwest)
Associate Minister of Health and Long-Term Care
First elected: 1995

Newman was appointed Minister of the Environment by Mike Harris in 2000. He was moved to Northern Development and Mines in 2001, and became associate health minister when Eves came to power in 2002.

Jerry OuelletteJerry Ouellette

(Oshawa)
Minister of Natural Resources
First elected: 1995

Ouellette was appointed to Natural Resources when Eves became leader in 2002. It is his first cabinet portfolio.

Bob RuncimanBob Runciman

(Leeds-Grenville)
Minister of Public Safety and Security
First elected: 1981

Runciman was Solicitor General and Minister of Correctional Services from 1995 to 1999. During Mike Harris's second term as premier, Runciman served as Minister of Consumer and Commercial Relations, and Minister of Economic Development. He was named to the newly created Ministry of Public Safety and Security when Eves became leader in 2002.

Norm SterlingNorm Sterling

(Lanark-Carleton)
Attorney General, Minister Responsible for Native Affairs
First elected: 1977

Sterling became Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Native Affairs in 2003. Prior to this, he has been Minister of Transportation, Consumer and Business Services, Intergovernmental Affairs, the Environment, and Consumer and Commercial Relations.

David TsubouchiDavid Tsubouchi

(Markham)
Chair of the Management Board of Cabinet, Minister of Culture
First elected: 1995

Tsubouchi was named to Mike Harris' cabinet in 1995 as Minister of Community and Social Services, where he famously suggested that poor people could save money by purchasing dented cans of tuna. He also served as Minister of Consumer and Commerical relations, Solicitor General and Chair of the Management Board under Harris. When Eves became premier in 2002, he left Tsubouchi at Management Board, and also made him Minister of Culture (perhaps in recognition of his role in David Cronenberg's 1983 horror film Videodrome.)

David TurnbullDavid Turnbull

(Don Valley West)
Associate Minister of Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation
First elected: 1990

Turnbull became government whip in 1995, and was named to cabinet in 1997. He became Transportation Minister following the 1999 election, moved to Solicitor General in 2001, and became Associate Minister of Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation when Eves became leader in 2002.

Jim WilsonJim Wilson

(Simcoe-Grey)
Minister of Northern Development and Mines, Minister of Environment
First elected: 1990

Wilson was named Minister of Health when the Harris Tories came to power in 1995. He was shuffled to the newly formed Ministry of Energy, Science and Technology in 1997. Eves moved him to Northern Development and Mines in 2002. Wilson added Environment to his responsibilities in 2003 when Chris Stockwell resigned in the midst of an expense-account scandal.

David YoungDavid Young

(Willowdale)
Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing
First elected: 1999

Young was named Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Native Affairs by Mike Harris, and given the additional responsibility of Gaming when Eves became leader in 2002. He was shuffled to Municipal Affairs and Housing in 2003 following the resignation of then-minister Chris Hodgson.
 

 


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