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Bizarre political domain names fetch big bucks at auction

Categories: Community, Politics

 Since June 2012, more than 1,600 domain names containing GOP candidate names Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan were registered by the world's biggest domain registrant. (iStock) How much is owning a website called "UnicornsForRomney.com" or "Brobama.com" worth to you?

In the current cycle of expired domain names being auctioned at GoDaddy.com, they're up for $800 and $49,358 respectively along with hundreds of other politically-derived URLs spanning the spectrum from congratulatory to downright obscene.

Comical as some of these names may be, domain reselling is a serious business that can pull in huge amounts of money for those who manage to sell even one big-ticket URL.

Political campaign periods often bring with them a surge in new registrations according to domain industry news source Domain Name Wire. Stats released this month by Go Daddy, the largest domain name registrar in the world, show that the US Presidential election of 2012 is no exception.

Since June 2012, more than 1,600 domain names containing GOP candidate names Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan were registered with Go Daddy according to the company.

Combinations of potential running mate names and party support phrases are popular choices among political squatters, but even a misspelling of a candidate's name can boast a hefty pricetag. Mitchromney.com is currently priced at $9,000.

One lucky buyer had the foresight to register RomneyRyan.com back in 2010. It's now up for sale on Flippa.com, a marketplace for buying and selling websites.

"Don't sell it'll be worth millions if Romney wins," writes one commenter on the domain name's sale page. With more than 20,000 unique visitors stumbling onto the page per day, that may be true.

The seller is asking $100,000 for the domain, which redirects now to an anti-Romney landing page.

This trend got us thinking about which domain names might be snapped up in Canada's next federal election.

Give us some of your suggestions in the comments below, and let us know what you think of domain squatting. Is buying a domain name with the intention to sell it for more money right away poor form, or is all fair in love and politics?

Tags: POV

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