Inside Politics

PM to talk Ring of Fire, pension reform with visiting Ontario premier

All eyes will be on Vancouver as Special Federal Representative for West Coast Energy Infrastructure Douglas Eyford unveils his final report on "enhancing engagement of Aboriginal groups in resource development and environmental protection" in Vancouver.

According to PMO, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver will be on site to discuss his findings after the report has been released.

Back on Hill, for the first time since he took office, it appears that the PM won't be on hand to flick the switch at the annual Christmas Lights illumination ceremony, with that honour instead falling to Canadian Heritage Minister Shelly Glover.

The PM was, however, able to carve out some time to meet with Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, who will drop by his office this afternoon for a closed-door chat on the Ring of Fire mining project, as well as pension reform.

Back in the Commons, MPs will start the day by picking up where they left off in debating the pros and cons of the government's bid to hand over more power to the Northwest Territories, which is scheduled to hit committee later this morning.

Once that wraps up, they'll go back to second reading of a bill that would initiate "priority hiring for injured veterans," which will be followed by other items on the pre-holiday priority list if time allows.

This evening, New Democrat MP Charmaine Borg will have one last chance to persuade her Commons colleagues to back her proposal to boost the powers of the privacy commissioner.

Later this morning, Canadian Labour Congress executive vice president Barbara Byers heads to the Centre Block press theatre to launch a first-ever survey to study "the impact of domestic violence on workers and workplaces."

Outside the Chamber, the Canada-European Union free trade agreement continues to provide fodder for no fewer than three committees: International Trade, Agriculture and Fisheries.

Over at Justice, representatives from the Mohawk councils of Akwesasne and Kahnawake will share their collective and respective thoughts on a bill to crack down on contraband tobacco sales.

This afternoon, Senator Hugh Segal, who currently serves as special envoy to the Commonwealth, will field questions on the current situation in Sri Lanka at the International Human Rights Subcommittee.

Meanwhile, Foreign Affairs gets an update on the state of affairs in Syria before its members retreat behind closed doors to work on a report on Canada's "engagement in the Americas."

Back on Hill, for the first time since he took office, it appears that the PM won't be on hand to flick the switch at the annual Christmas Lights illumination ceremony, with that honour instead falling to Canadian Heritage Minister Shelly Glover.

Elsewhere on the ministerial circuit:

  • In Toronto, Health Minister Rona Ambrose drops by the Sick Kids Hospital to meet with organ and tissue recipients with Laureen Harper and David Foster, whose foundation is behind the Miracle Gala and Concert that she will attend this evening.
  • Elsewhere in the city, Western Economic Diversification Minister Michelle Rempel will "provide remarks" at the Innovation 2013 Conference.
  • Meanwhile, in Montreal, International Development Minister Christian Paradis breakfasts with the local board of trade, while Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier "highlights the benefits" of the Canada-European free trade deal at an agricultural producers conference in Quebec City.  
For up to the minute dispatches from the precinct and beyond, keep your eye on the Parliament Hill Ticker below -- or, alternatively, bookmark it and check back throughout the day. 

Mobile-friendly auto-updating text feed available here

NOTE: Updates added in reverse chronological (newer to older) order.

Tags: blackberry jungle, orders of the day

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