CBCnews

Recently in John Gilchrist Category

John Gilchrist: Canadian farmers, processors will benefit from new food label rules

John Gilchrist is a Calgary-based food writer and restaurant critic.

Have you read any good food labels lately?

A trip to the grocery store is getting to be more like a visit to the library thanks to the new food labeling guidelines that came into effect on January 1. We now have clear definitions of what Product of Canada and Made in Canada mean. And it should be a good move for Canadian farmers and food processors.

Continue reading this post » (1 Archived Comment)

John Gilchrist: Restaurant trends for 2009

John Gilchrist is a Calgary-based food writer and restaurant critic.

Now that we’ve settled into the New Year, it’s time to look ahead and see what’s coming down the culinary road. The food and restaurant industries are always evolving as they look for new tastes and trends, and innovative ways to increase their market and satisfy the customer.

So what are the hot trends for 2009? Here are a few that I think we’ll see across Canada this year.

Continue reading this post » (1 Archived Comment)

John Gilchrist: Cutting back on glitzy office parties

(John Gilchrist is a Calgary-based food writer and restaurant critic.)

We’ve been talking non-stop about the economic downturn for the past few months, but for many people it hasn’t really sunk in yet. Sure, we’ve seen the numbers go down on our stocks and mutual funds, but we’ve also seen the prices fall at the gas pumps. So, for many, some long-term pain is a trade-off for a little short term gain.

But now the chickens have come home to roost. It’s time for the annual corporate Christmas party, and in many quarters the party process has changed significantly since 2007.

Continue reading this post » (2 Archived Comments)

John Gilchrist: Blame mega-turkeys on the supply chain

Money Talks is a daily business column from CBC radio.

John Gilchrist is a Calgary-based food writer and restaurant critic and fan of a good turkey dinner.

At this time of year we sit between the two biggest Canadian turkey events on our calendar - and I'm not talking about federal elections. No, we're about halfway between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

But the question I hear every year is: "Why can't I find a turkey that's smaller than 16 pounds? Where have all the 10 and 12 pounders gone?" Well, they've gone away. The current trend to gargantuan turkeys has to do with how the turkey industry chooses breeds and raises the birds these days.

Continue reading this post » (1 Archived Comment)