President

270 of 538 electoral votes are required for a majority

The race to 270

Americans pick their preferred candidate for president, but they don’t directly elect that person. The electoral college vote determines the winner.

There are 538 electoral college votes in all, making 270 the minimum number a candidate must take in order to win the election.

State-by-state results

Leading or winning candidate by state

  •  Democrat win
  •  Democrat leading
  •  Other
  •  Republican leading
  •  Republican win

The election landscape

Electoral college votes are determined by the number of U.S. Congress members each state has, so bigger states have more votes — for example, California (55) and Texas (38). But most states are either Democratic or Republican strongholds, so the election is likely to be decided in "battleground" states — that is, states where the polls are showing tight races or where votes have historically been close.

Battleground states

Éric Grenier's list of states most likely to determine the election outcome

Search any state by name

Senate

51 of 100 seats are required for a majority
A total of 34 seats are up for grabs in this election: 10 Democratic and 24 Republican
  • Democrat DEM
  •  Democrat seats up for election DEM seats up for election
  • Other OTH
  • Republican seats up for election REP seats up for election
  • Republican REP

The battle for the Senate

The Senate contains 100 seats (two for each state), but senators’ terms are staggered, which means that every two years, one-third of the seats come up for election. That means there are 34 seats in play this year.

The Senate has the power to confirm presidential appointees, including ambassadors and Supreme Court justices.

The latter is especially crucial this year, as the government seeks to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court in light of Antonin Scalia’s death. President Barack Obama named Merrick Garland as Scalia’s replacement, but the Republican-controlled Senate has held off on confirming him in the hope Trump wins the presidency, thereby giving Republicans the opportunity to pick their own justice.

One of the big stories of 2016 is whether or not the Democrats will be able to retake control of the Senate. To do so, the party needs to gain five seats from the Republicans, or four if they win the presidency, as vice-presidents break any ties in the Senate.

Senate representation by state

Each state has two senators

  • Democrat DEM
  • Republican REP
  • Other OTH
  • Undetermined TBD

House

218 of 435 seats are required for a majority
  • Democrat DEM
  • Other OTH
  • Republican REP

In the House

All 435 seats in the House of Representatives are up for election this year. Republicans hold a more significant majority of the seats here than in the Senate. The Democrats would need to pick up 30 seats to flip the House.

One of the unique responsibilities of the House is that it can initiate budget bills, as well as proceedings to impeach a president.

House representation by state

The number of representatives is proportional to each state’s population

State
Seats
DEM
REP
OTH
State
Seats
DEM
REP
OTH
  • * “Precinct” refers to a U.S. electoral district. Each precinct has a designated location where residents go to vote.
  • ** This is an unusual situation in which the field of non-Democrat, non-Republican candidates combined take the largest share of the popular vote.
  • *** If no candidate receives 50 per cent of the vote, a runoff election will be held between the two top candidates at a later date.​

NOTE: Results are not final until certified by electoral authorities in each state.

Editing: Andre Mayer | Design and Development: Adam Foord, Richard Grasley, Alisa Mamak, Elizabeth Melito, CBC News Interactives