Saša Petricic

Asia correspondent

Saša Petricic is the CBC's Asia correspondent, based in Beijing. He has covered China as well as reported from North and South Korea. He previously reported on the Middle East, from Jerusalem, through the Arab Spring and the Syrian civil war. He has filed stories from every continent for CBC News. Instagram: @sasapetricic

Latest from Saša Petricic

Trump's withdrawal from North Korea summit weakens optimism in South

The idea of peace on a peninsula still technically at war has started to feel so real that there’s a boom in property sales inside the demilitarized zone, writes Saša Petricic.

Wildly conflicting messages from North Korea give Trump second thoughts about summit

As South Korean President Moon Jae-in arrives in Washington today, he and U.S. President Donald Trump will almost certainly ask themselves whether Trump should even meet Kim Jong-un in Singapore on June 12.
Analysis

Trump's latest tweets create another twist in U.S.-China trade talks

A high-level Chinese delegation will meet with U.S. officials in Washington on Tuesday for the second round in discussions to head off a trade war, writes Saša Petricic.
Analysis

Ahead of historic Korea summit, optimism and obstacles each loom large

When North Korean leader Kim Jong-un steps across the border on Friday, setting in motion the historic inter-Korea summit, every step will have been carefully considered, choreographed and catered.
Analysis

Warnings to Taipei and Washington: China takes real and verbal shots across Taiwan Strait

This week’s Chinese maneuvering over Taiwan's independence was as much a propaganda exercise as a military one, firing off the kind of verbal shots the Chinese leadership does more and more.

China is no longer world's dumping ground, but cleaning up its own backyard is proving to be a challenge

China has a plan designed to clean up the world's biggest pile of waste, one that's been building across the country for decades
Analysis

Is Beijing spoiling for a trade war?

If U.S. officials wanted to provoke a sharp response from China after President Donald Trump proposed tariffs of up to $60 billion on Chinese goods, they got one, CBC’s Saša Petricic writes from Beijing.
Analysis

An invitation to Pyongyang: Is North Korea's overture a path to peace or simply a ploy?

At the Olympic Games, the sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un delivered a verbal invitation to the South Korean president to meet him in Pyongyang. A lot hangs on that RSVP, writes Saša Petricic.

As Olympics open door to reunification, young Koreans are tuning out

Older South Koreans have long dreamed of unification with the North, but more and more that dream is being seen as a delusion, especially by the younger generations, writes Saša Petricic.

An Olympic-sized 'window of opportunity' — or a North Korean ruse?

After months of rising tensions, warnings and threats from Washington and defiant tests of nuclear devices and missiles, North and South will march together at the Winter Olympics beginning Feb. 9.
PHOTOS

Back on track: China's rural poor regain sight and self-reliance aboard hospital train

The Lifeline Express deploys hospital trains to rural areas in China, where a poor, aging population can get on board and get free cataract operations.
Analysis

Trump's Asia visit will be no walk in the park

The trip is not only the longest foreign visit for this novice president, it’s the most ambitious Asian tour for any U.S. leader in more than a decade. Over 12 days, Trump will visit China, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines.
Analysis

China's Xi Jinping grows in power and influence, prepares to 'act big'

Xi Jinping may have opened China's Communist Party Congress as 'first among equals,' but he walks away as much more than that. He's now likely the most powerful leader this country's known since Mao Zedong.
Analysis

Nothing left to chance as 19th congress of Chinese Communist Party opens today

As the red curtain rises on this week's key meeting of China's rulers — the 19th Congress of the Communist Party — nothing is being left to chance. Large gatherings are banned and the internet is in virtual lockdown.

'The lifestyle is brutal': North Korean defectors take risky journey out and fear for family left behind

Several thousand North Koreans try to defect every year, but only about 1,500 routinely make it to South Korea, where the transition to a new life isn’t always easy, Saša Petricic writes from Seoul.