Morocco arrests Belgian man linked to Paris attackers

Morocco's Interior Ministry says that police have arrested a Belgian man of Moroccan descent who had a "direct relationship" to the attackers who killed 130 people around Paris on Nov. 13.

Moroccan government says suspect detained Monday near Casablanca

People gather in front of a makeshift memorial in Place de la Republique square in Paris, on Nov. 27, 2015, for a tribute to the 130 people killed in the Nov. 13 Paris attacks. Morocco says it has arrested a Belgian national linked to the Paris attackers. (Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images)

Moroccan authorities have arrested a Belgian national of local origin directly linked to the attackers who carried out the Paris shootings and bombings in November that killed 130 people, the government said in a statement on Monday.

The Interior Ministry gave only the suspect's initials in Arabic and said he fought in Syria with al-Nusra front before joining the Islamic State.

The suspect, whose initials could be translated to J.A. or G.A., was arrested on Jan. 15 in the city of Mohammedia, the statement added. "He went to Syria with one of the suicide bombers of Saint Denis," it said.

Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a 28-year-old Belgian militant who authorities said was the ringleader of the Paris attacks, was killed with other suspects days after when police raided a house in the Saint Denis suburb.

Investigations showed that during his stay in Syria he has built solid ties with Islamic State leaders including the ringleader of the Paris attacks.

The suspect was trained to handle different weapons and guerrilla tactics but left Syria through Turkey, Germany, Belgium then Netherlands from where he came to Morocco.

Morocco provided the tip-off that enabled French police to locate Abaaoud, has been holding Abaaoud's brother Yassine since October and has issued an arrest warrant for Salah Abdeslam, who is suspected of taking part in the attacks and is on the run.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.