Video

Cicadas reappear after 17 years

A large brood of cicadas has emerged after spending 17 years underground in the U.S. Northeast. The CBC's Paul Hunter takes a tour with a cicada watcher who is fascinated by the loud and lusty insects, and talks to another man who thinks the buzzing bugs are a tasty treat.

Periodical cicadas ready to mate after resurfacing

In the eastern U.S., cicadas are emerging from the ground by the billions to complete their life cycle (after some amorous action). 3:54

A large brood of periodical cicadas — insects that spend 17 years underground before surfacing to mate — is emerging right on schedule in parts of the U.S. Northeast.

And the loud and lusty bugs will be crossing the border into Canada.

Andrew Hebda, a curator of zoology for the Nova Scotia government, says the insects will most likely be found in the Halifax region, the Annapolis Valley, Yarmouth and possibly Cape Breton.

The CBC's Paul Hunter takes a tour with a cicada watcher who is fascinated by the buzzing bugs, and talks to another man who thinks they are a tasty treat.

When it comes to the bugs mating, "truly, you don’t really want to watch," Hunter reports. "It’s kind of yucky."

To spare you, we’ve blurred the video.