China landslide death toll climbs to 58 after several bodies recovered

Chinese rescuers have dug out dozens of bodies from a massive landslide that occurred at a construction waste dump in southern China more than two weeks ago, bringing the death toll to 58, authorities said Wednesday.

It is likely over 80 died in Dec. 20 disaster, as 25 remain missing

In this Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015, file photo, rescuers search at the industrial park in Shenzhen, in south China's Guangdong province. (Andy Wong/Associated Press)

Chinese rescuers have dug out dozens of bodies from a massive landslide that occurred at a construction waste dump in southern China more than two weeks ago, bringing the death toll to 58, authorities said Wednesday.

The Shenzhen city government said authorities had identified 52 of the 58 bodies and that an additional 25 people remain missing.

In the Dec. 20 disaster, a mountain of construction waste that had been piled up against a hill collapsed during heavy rains onto an industrial park in Shenzhen. The city near Hong Kong makes products ranging from cellphones to cars, and attracts workers from all parts of China.

Authorities have arrested 11 people on the charge of negligently causing a serious accident. One local official overseeing the regulations of the construction waste jumped to his death, and senior officials have bowed in public apology over the incident.

Despite the threat of prison time over major industrial accidents, a lack of regulatory oversight and cost-cutting by management often lead to deadly disasters in China.

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