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Officer killed after Charlie Hebdo attack honoured

France is continuing to mark the anniversary of the first major deadly assaults in Paris inspired by jihadist movements — attacks which included shootings at the offices of a satirical magazine and a kosher supermarket.
Fawaz Gerges, author of the new book, ISIS: A History, talks about what's behind the deadly attacks in the French capital 6:41

France is continuing to mark the anniversary of the first major deadly assaults in Paris inspired by jihadist movements — attacks which included shootings at the offices of a satirical magazine and a kosher supermarket.

French president François Hollande attended a ceremony on the outskirts of Paris, held in honour of police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe. She was was shot dead the day after two gunmen — brothers — entered the Paris offices of the weekly Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7 and killed 11 people.

Police say the assailant who killed the officer in the Paris suburb of Montrouge knew the brothers.

On Jan. 8, the officer's attacker then raided a kosher supermarket in the city's easternmost neighbourhood, where he killed four hostages before being shot himself.

Hollande unveiled a commemorative plaque for Jean-Philippe, the 26-year-old police officer who was shot dead by a French Islamist gunman, Amedy Coulibaly. The French president also joined Montrouge Mayor Jean-Loup Metton in laying a wreath of flowers near the scene of the killing along Avenue Pierre-Brossolette.

Last January's attacks opened what proved to be a bloody year in France, with a wave of suicide bombings and shootings on Nov. 13 claiming another 130 lives.

On Sunday, the final day of a week of remembrance, an oak tree will be planted in the Place de la Republique in a ceremony attended by Hollande.

President François Hollande lays a wreath during a memorial service Saturday on the outskirts of the French capital, held for a police officer killed a day after the mass shooting at the offices of the weekly Charlie Hebdo in eastern Paris. (Reuters)

With files from Reuters

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