Mother of John Robert Gallagher, killed fighting ISIS, awaits return of son's remains

The mother of a Canadian who was killed while fighting ISIS said she doesn't know when she'll be able to bring her son's body home.

She says repatriating son John Robert Gallagher's body is her priority

John Robert Gallagher, here in a photo shared on his Facebook page, was volunteering with a U.S.-backed Kurdish militia, known as the YPG, when he died. His mother says Canadian diplomats are working together with the YPG to bring his body back to Canada. (Facebook)

The mother of a Canadian who was killed while fighting ISIS said she doesn't know when she'll be able to bring her son's body home.

Valerie Carder said that right now, repatriating John Robert Gallagher's body is her priority, but for the time being, all she can do is wait.

Gallagher, 32, was killed in Syria fighting ISIS in Syria on Wednesday.

"There is definitely action ongoing right now to bring him home," she said. "And that is our focus right now. To bring him home."

While initial reports said Gallagher was killed by a suicide bomber, the National Post reported Saturday he was shot at close range.

Carder said she's received conflicting information about the cause of his death.

Gallagher was volunteering with a U.S.-backed Kurdish militia, known as the YPG, when he died, and Carder says Canadian diplomats are working together with the YPG to bring Gallagher's body back to Canada.

Carder said she has many fond memories of her son, who used to be a member of the armed forces.

"Right now, I suppose I'm thinking most of our last drive together to the airport, and saying goodbye to him," Carder said.

Federal government officials said due to privacy considerations there is little they can say on the case.

They say they are gathering information and noted that due to turmoil in Syria Canada's ability to provide diplomatic assistance is severely limited.

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