Joe Biden tells DNC Donald Trump talks 'a bunch of malarkey'

In what was likely the last prime-time speech of his political life, U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden delivered a case for Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention Wednesday night with his regular-guy folksiness, misty-eyed storytelling and a few hard hits.

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Outgoing U.S. vice-president tells Democratic convention Americans have an 'unbreakable spirit' 17:22

In what was likely the last prime-time speech of his political life, U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden delivered a case for Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention Wednesday night with his regular-guy folksiness, misty-eyed storytelling and a few hard hits.

A native of Scranton, Pa., Biden appealed directly to the working class white voters who have been drawn to Donald Trump's populism, warning them against falling for false promises and exploitation of Americans' anxieties.

"If you worry about your jobs and getting a decent pay, if you worry about your children's education, if you're taking care of an elderly parent — then there's only one person in this election who will help you … and that's Hillary Clinton's life story. She's always been there."

He said Clinton, who he's known for more than 30 years, is smart, tough and passionate, and understands what matters to Americans.

Biden also made a searing attack on Trump, telling the crowd not to cheer or boo for a minute before getting into it.

He said the Republican presidential nominee's "cynicism and undoubtedly his lack of empathy and compassion can be summed up in that phrase he is most proud of making famous: 'You're fired,"' Biden said. "He is trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. Give me a break. That is a bunch of malarkey."

Delegates chanted "not a clue, not a clue" and jumped to their feet after his remarks.

Biden said Trump embraces the tactics of America's enemies, such as torture and religious intolerance.

"That's not who we are. It betrays our values. It alienates those who we need in the fight against ISIS," he said.

He continued, saying the country cannot elect a man "who seeks to sow division in America for his own gain, and disorder around the world."

"We simply cannot let that happen," he said, to rousing cheering from the thousands in the audience.

Biden also touched briefly on Obama's legacy, saying he is "one of the finest presidents we've ever had."

With files from Laura Wright, CBC News

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