U.S. President Barack Obama says Congress has the ability to act immediately to address the wave of unaccompanied children coming over the border from Mexico into the U.S.

Obama spoke in Dallas, Texas after meeting Wednesday with Gov. Rick Perry and other officials about the Central American children entering the country by the thousands.

Obama says Perry raised four areas of concern. Obama says he doesn't have a philosophical objection to anything Perry suggested. He says if Congress passes his emergency $3.7 billion funding request, the government will have resources to take some of the steps Perry recommended.

Obama says the problem is fixable if lawmakers are interested in solving it. He says if the preference is for politics, it won't be solved.

Meanwhile, top Obama administration officials told senators Wednesday they're struggling to keep up with the surge of immigrants at the southern border, acknowledging they've been overwhelmed as children show up by the tens of thousands from violence-torn Central America.

"We have not been what I would say successful yet" in ensuring that the unaccompanied kids are processed by the Border Patrol as quickly as required, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate testified before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

"The children continue to come across the border. It's a very fluid situation," Fugate said. "Although we have made progress, that progress is oftentimes disrupted when we see sudden influxes of kids coming in faster than we can discharge them, and we back up."

Gil Kerlikowske, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection commissioner, said that the number of children picked up since October now stands at 57,000, up from 52,000 in mid-June, and more than double what it was at the same time last year.

The situation, Kerlikowske said, "is difficult and distressing on a lot of levels."

The testimony came a day after President Barack Obama appealed to Congress to give him $3.7 billion in emergency spending to deal with the crisis, which has become a political test for his administration as it sparks fierce debate on Capitol Hill and beyond.

Fuel for Republican critics

The president was in Texas Wednesday for a fundraising trip, but he resisted calls to visit the border. Instead Obama planned to meet in Dallas with faith leaders and Texas officials, including Republican Gov. Rick Perry.

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Two female detainees sleep in a holding cell, as the children are separated by age group and gender, as hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Arizona. (Ross D. Franklin/Reuters)

The crisis gave Republicans a fresh opportunity to question the administration's competence even as it complicated the debate over the nation's fractured immigration laws.

Republicans at Wednesday's hearing slammed Obama administration policies, blaming his efforts to relax some deportation rules for contributing to rumours circulating in Central America that once here, migrant kids would be allowed to stay.

"We're trying to stop human trafficking. Are we actually increasing it?" asked Senator Ron Johnson, a Republican representative from Wisconsin.

Senator John McCain, a Republican representative from Arizona, noted that a high percentage of the children fleeing El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala are able to succeed in their goal of staying in America because they're issued notices to appear at court hearings in the distant future, and many never do.

"Your odds are pretty good," McCain said. "There is ample incentive for them to come to this country."

'Planeloads upon planeloads of children'

Republicans insisted that the best way to deter the flow of migrants would be to deport the kids faster. Johnson criticized a campaign of ads the administration is mounting in Central America telling people not to come here.

"They will do nothing ... nothing that planeloads upon planeloads of children would do," Johnson said.

The Obama administration says it wants more flexibility to turn the kids around more quickly, since current law requires minors from countries other than Mexico or Canada to go through the court system in what is often a lengthy process. But immigrant advocates and some Democrats are balking at that idea, arguing that it would jeopardize the children's legal protections and put them at risk.

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People hoping to reach the U.S. ride atop the wagon of a freight train, known as La Bestia (The Beast) in Ixtepec, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Thousands of young people are fleeing violence in Central America. (Jose de Jesus Cortes/Reuters)

The Department of Justice announced Wednesday that it's changing its priorities in order to respond to the crisis. Juan Osuna, director of the executive office of immigration review, testified that deportation cases involving unaccompanied child immigrants and parents traveling with children would be moved to the top of court dockets. That means lower priority cases will take even longer to wend through a court system where there's currently a backlog of more than 360,000 pending deportation cases.

Obama's emergency spending request would add more judges to the court system, but elsewhere on Capitol Hill Wednesday Republicans raised questions about it. House Speaker John Boehner was noncommittal about whether the House would vote on it.

"If we don't secure the border, nothing's going to change. And if you look at the president's request, it's all more about continuing to deal with the problem," Boehner told reporters. "We've got to do something about sealing the border and ending this problem so that we can begin to move on with the bigger question of immigration reform."