Australian loses sex injury compensation case

Australia's highest court has ruled that a bureaucrat who was injured while having sex on a business trip is not eligible for worker's compensation.

In 2007, a woman was injured at a hotel while having sex when a glass light fitting fell on her

An Australian woman in her 30s was hospitalized after being injured at a hotel on a work-related trip in 2007. (IStock)

Australia's highest court has ruled that a bureaucrat who was injured while having sex on a business trip is not eligible for worker's compensation.

The majority ruling in the High Court on Wednesday was the first court defeat for the woman. She had won the previous two court cases against the federal government insurer.

The woman cannot be identified for legal reasons. She was a federal civil servant in her 30s when she was hospitalized in 2007 after being injured at a hotel on a work-related trip.

While having sex with a man, she was injured by a glass light fitting that fell onto her face, injuring her nose and mouth. She later suffered depression and was unable to continue working for the government.

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