'Narrowest house' in Toronto hits market at $750,000

A detached house in Toronto is running for less than $1 million, with one major caveat: It's only eight-feet wide.

The 1,000 square foot home has two bedrooms, three bathrooms and a basement

The 1,000 square foot home has two bedrooms, three bathrooms and a basement, though there's no parking space. (Re/Max )

A detached house in Toronto is running for less than $1 million, with one major caveat: It's only eight-feet wide.

The three-storey house with finished basement at 383 Shuter St. is listed at $750,000.  

"I've had people as tall as 6'4" walk into the property and be surprised how spacious it is," said realtor Frank Leo. 

He's also calling it the "narrowest house" in Toronto. He told Newstalk 1010 that there is a narrower house, but it's not a detached.

The 1,000 square foot home has two bedrooms, three bathrooms and finished basement, though there's no space to park given the house is narrower than most cars. 

This is one of the two bedrooms in the three-storey home. (Re/Max)

It comes with a green landscaped garden and a cathedral ceiling, which aren't common in the city. 

The house was built in 1890 with only one storey. Leo said the previous owner, an architect, decided to add a few floors and expand the building to its current size. It's been remodeled since then. 

The house has a landscaped garden in the back surrounded by wooden fence. (Re/Max)
The current owner, George Samaras, 61, has lived in it for 25 years, after leaving a three-storey detached house in 1990. 

"I won't miss that house, but I'll miss this place because it's one of a kind," Samaras told the Toronto Star. "It has character. Everybody stops and looks at it."

Large windows bring lots of light into the narrow home, realtor Frank Leo says. (Re/Max)
Leo's favourite feature is "the brightness of the home, it's open and the high ceiling," which come thanks to the big windows that cover much of the front and back of the house.

Samaras said he is moving to Niagara Falls because he's tired of living in a big city. His neighbourhood, Regent Park, is in the midst of a revitalization.

"The neighbourhood is changing by far," Samaras told the Toronto Sun. "It's not the Regent Park ... people know."

The odd proportions of the home have attracted international media attention, especially online, Leo says, attention that has attracted quite a few prospective buyers. 

"Marketing is what we do," he said. "The more attention any of our properties gets, that's what we're hired to do."

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