Comedy show wants to help Canada build U.S. border wall

Building a wall between Canada and the United States was a laughable idea during the U.S. presidential race, but it's one that never quite disappears.

U.K. program wants the world to help "brick it for Canada"

The U.K. program, the Last Leg, suggested that given the sudden interest in Americans moving to Canada, Canadians might want extra protection along the border. (Last Leg/Channel 4)

Building a wall between Canada and the United States has been a laughable idea during the U.S. presidential race, but it's one that never quite disappears. 

Case in point, the U.K. comedy show The Last Leg is looking to get people to click for Canada. They have a campaign called "Bricking It For Canada" to help "fund" a wall that would cover the border between Canada and the U.S.

The program suggested that given the sudden interest in Americans moving to Canada, Canadians might want extra protection along the border. 

"I think if I was Canada, I'd be worried," said host Adam Hills. "There's every chance they're going to face an influx of American refugees and they are harder to look after any other refugees."

Hills then joked that Americans need more food and "don't speak basic English." 

"They carry more guns and refuse to assimilate with other cultures," he added. 

Hills then announced their "Brickstarter." The show launched a website in which you click a button and pledge to add a brick to the proposed wall along the Canada-U.S. border. 

The Last Leg estimated that it would take 1,545,454,550 bricks to cover the 8,891 kilometre border. So far there are 10.7 million pledges for bricks. 

"We would like everyone in the world to pledge a brick to help keep Americans in America," said Hills.

A few British celebrities came out in the segment to say that they support "Bricking it for Canada," including comedians Phil Jupitus, Alan Carr and Jack Dee. 

They also proposed the hashtag #BrickingitforCanada, which people have used to show their support in keeping Canada an America-free zone. 

Ben Carson, previously a presidential hopeful before dropping out, said that he would push for U.S. troops to patrol the Canadian border.

During the Feb. 25 Republican debate, a moderator from the Spanish-language channel Telemundo said that more risk of terrorism might be coming from the Canada-U.S. border than from Mexican one.

"With Canada, you're talking about a massively long piece. You're talking about a border that would be about four times longer," Trump replied.

While the borders don't have as large a difference in length as Trump implies, Canada's border is at least double in length to Mexico's, as the latter is only 3,145 kilometres long.

Meanwhile, a man dressed up as the Mexican border wall, an oft-repeated policy of Trump, appeared at his rally in Florida, in anticipation of the Florida Republican primary on March 15. 

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