Declassified transcripts show Bill Clinton, Tony Blair talked like pals

A 532-page document detailing conversations between Bill Clinton and Tony Blair released on Friday give a rare, and at times very personal, glimpse into the lives of the two politicians. Here's a look at a few of their chats.

Read the Clinton Presidential Records Mandatory Declassification Review

Transcripts of conversations between Bill Clinton and Tony Blair released on Friday give a rare, and at times very personal, glimpse into the lives of the two politicians during the time they were in power. Here they share a moment at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York in 2010. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

Transcripts of conversations between Bill Clinton and Tony Blair released on Friday cover dozens of interactions between the U.S. president and British prime minister. They spoke at length and often as pals.

The 532-page document covering 1997 to 2000 was released by the Clinton Presidential Library through a Freedom of Information request by the BBC. 

It begins with a call congratulating Blair on his election ...

(Clinton Presidential Library)

Then moves on to talk of Clinton's daughter, Chelsea ...

(Clinton Presidential Library)

Followed by a story about eating pig ears with 'Boris'

(Clinton Presidential Library)

Some of the leaders' chats got a bit odd.

(Clinton Presidential Library)

While much of what Clinton said is now a matter of public record, much of what Blair had to say has been redacted — a response to a 2009 order by U.S. President Barack Obama to keep classified anything pertaining to the national security of foreign governments when it comes to their relationship with America.


Not surprisingly, they share some pretty influential friends.

(Clinton Presidential Library)
(Clinton Presidential Library)

Clinton and Blair also shared a heartfelt call on the death of Diana.

(Clinton Presidential Library)
(Clinton Presidential Library)

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