Photos

A coy-looking Kate and North Korea's air show are in the week in pictures

From a photo of Kate looking coyly at Justin Trudeau to a woman eating a pork bun during a powerful typhoon, here's the week in pictures for Sept. 24-30.

Top shots from around the world for the week of Sept. 24-30

(Andrew Chin/Getty)

Kate's 'Trudeau face' was internet gold during the royal visit.

Vancouver photographer Andrew Chin snapped the shot above of Prince William's wife, Kate, looking coy while on the royal couple's visit to B.C. this week. It almost didn't make the cut when he was submitting his day's work, but he said he thought it was "cute" and sent it to Getty Images despite being "technically imperfect." Some 95,000 people on Facebook are surely glad he did.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge wrap up their eight-day visit to Canada on Saturday after travelling from Victoria to Vancouver, Bella Bella, Kelowna, Whitehorse, Yukon, Haida Gwaii and back to Victoria, where on Thursday Prince George and his sister, Princess Charlotte, held a play date.

(Chris Jackson/Getty)

Typhoon Megi swept across Taiwan and into China.

Strong winds knocked people down and scattered debris as a massive typhoon crossed over Taiwan on Tuesday before tracking into mainland China.

(Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

During the deadly and destructive weather this photo of a woman eating a pork bun (local media later identified her simply as Mrs. Dai) circulated widely on social media.

(Chiang Ying-ying/AP) (Chiang Ying-ying/AP)

A newly arrived master tailor saved a Torontonian's wedding dress.

A bride with a busted zipper got a last-minute helping hand from Ibrahim Haltl Dudu, a Syrian refugee and master tailor, who had arrived in Canada just four days earlier. Photographer Lindsay Coulter was there and recounted the story (and shared this photo) with CBC Kitchener-Waterloo.

(Submitted by Lindsay Coulter)

Meanwhile, airstrikes continued to pound Aleppo's rebel-held district.

A massive Russia-backed assault on the besieged Syrian city has left nearly 100 children dead and whole neighhbourhoods in ruin following a week of fighting that followed the collapse of a ceasefire in the war-torn country.

(Khalil Ashawi/Reuters)

U.S. Congress overturned a presidential veto but quickly regretted it.

Democrats joined with Republicans Wednesday to hand Barack Obama the first veto override of his presidency, voting overwhelmingly to allow families of 9-11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts for its alleged backing of the attackers. But even as the vote was going on, 28 senators raised the alarm over "unintended consequences" of the "hastily drafted" bill. Here's Obama boarding Air Force One in Virginia on the day of the vote.

(Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

North Korea held its first international air show this week.

The first-of-its-kind Wonsan Friendship Air Festival featured fighter jets, skydivers and thousands of spectators including foreign tourists and invited journalists.

(Ed Jones/AFP/Getty)

Getty photographer Ed Jones was there and took this shot of pilots reportedly known as the "sky flowers" in North Korea.

(Ed Jones/AFP/Getty)

There was also an air show in Malta and Formula One in Malaysia.

This is Italy's aerobatic Pioneer Team lighting it up last weekend over the Mediterranean, followed by a slow-shutter shot of a Lewis Hamilton pit stop at the Malaysia Grand Prix.

(Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters)
(Edgar Su/Reuters)

Meanwhile, in Paris, it's the middle of Fashion Week.

The biannual gathering of fashion's heavy hitters is underway and included a runway show by French designer Alexis Mabille, as seen here. Fashion Week runs in the French capital until Oct. 5.

(Charles Platiau/Reuters)

With files from Reuters

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