Live TV is coming to YouTube — unless you live in Canada

U.S. subscribers will be able to watch more than 40 live television channels on YouTube for $35 US a month.

'YouTube TV is a U.S.-only app at this time,' a spokesperson for video-sharing website says

A subscription includes access to the four major U.S. networks — ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC — as well as channels such as ESPN, The CW, Disney, MSNBC and Fox News. (Reuters)

More than 40 live television channels are coming to YouTube this year for $35 US a month — but only if you live in the United States.

The new service, dubbed YouTube TV, "will be available soon in the largest U.S. markets and will quickly expand to cover more cities across the country," the company announced on Tuesday.

But those in Canada and other international markets will be waiting a while longer to cut that cord.

"YouTube TV is a U.S.-only app at this time," according to a statement from an unnamed YouTube spokesperson. "This particular proposition is unique to the U.S. TV market and any further rollout will be considered with the local market in mind." 

How does it work?

The streaming service will be accessible via YouTube's mobile apps or website, and includes a cloud DVR feature with unlimited storage (though recordings can only be stored for up to nine months). 

YouTube is working with local TV network affiliates in markets where YouTube TV is available to offer local sports, news, and other regional programming.

A subscription includes access to the four major U.S. networks — ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC — as well as channels such as ESPN, The CW, Disney, MSNBC and Fox News. Showtime is also available for an added fee, but premium networks such as HBO and AMC are not available.

The service is similar to Sony's PlayStation Vue service, Dish Network's Sling TV, and AT&T's DirecTV Now, all of which offer an overlapping, though not identical, selection of channels in a similar price range to YouTube TV. Much like YouTube TV, those services are only available in the U.S.

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About the Author

Matthew Braga

Senior Technology Reporter

Matthew Braga is the senior technology reporter for CBC News. He was previously the Canadian editor of Motherboard, Vice Media's science and technology website, and a business and technology reporter for the Financial Post. Email: matthew.braga@cbc.ca