Rosetta probe landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko scheduled

The European Space Agency has confirmed the time and place it will attempt to land the first spacecraft on a comet.

Philae lander will land on 'Site J' at 3:35 ET on Nov. 12

The unmanned probe Rosetta will release the 100-kilogram lander Philae, shown in this artist's conception, at 0835 GMT (3:35 ET) on Nov. 12. (J. Huart/ESA; ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INT)

The European Space Agency has confirmed the time and place it will attempt to land the first spacecraft on a comet.

The agency said Wednesday its unmanned probe Rosetta will release the 100-kilogram lander at 0835 GMT (3:35 ET) on Nov. 12.

The aim is to drop its lander Philae at a location dubbed `Site J' on the 4-kilometre wide comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

The maneuver will take about seven hours. But because the radio signals take 28 minutes to travel hundreds of millions of miles (kilometers) back to Earth, confirmation of a successful landing won't arrive until about 1603 GMT (11:03 a.m. EST).

Scientists hope the mission will help them learn more about the origins and evolution of objects in the universe.

Site J is located on the head of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. An inset showing a close up of the landing site is also shown. ( ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

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